Moving Through Art History WebQuest
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Moving Through Art History WebQuest

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Moving Through Art History WebQuest Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Moving Through Art History! Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 9th Grade Art Students Designed by Adriane Supino [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page View oddsock's map Taken in a place with no name (See more photos here ) Andy Warhol - Marilyn 1967 screen print on paper, 91.5 x 91.5 cm, museum of modern art, new York  Andy Warhol - Marilyn 1967 screen-print on paper, 91.5 x 91.5 cm, museum of modern art, new york   Photograph by Flickr: oddsock
  • 2. Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] We have learned about artistic movements, such as the Renaissance, Baroque art, and Classical art. These movements, although important, occurred so long ago! Now, we are going to learn about important art movements of the 20 th century, and we will see how these movements have influenced where we are today! Each group will learn about a different movement. These movements are: Expressionism, Surrealism, Pop art, Post-Painterly Abstraction, and Minimalism . Each of you will choose a role. You can be an artist of the movement, an art historian, or an art museum curator! Each role is important and the job you do in your role will help the entire class to create an amazing piece of art in the end! Let’s get started! View anna.hawaii's map Taken in a place with no name (See more photos or videos here )
  • 3. The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] At the end of this WebQuest, our class will create a large “timeline mural” that shows how art has gone through these movements in the 20 th century! In order to do this, we must be educated on these art movements! Each group will learn about a different art movement and will then present that information to the class. After learning from other groups, we will create our masterpiece! Title Photo by Flickr: June 6, 2007 by anna.hawaii
  • 4. The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • First, you will be divided into groups of three. Each group will be assigned an art movement of the 20 th century (Expressionism, Surrealism, Pop Art, Post-Painterly Abstraction, or Minimalism).
    • Once your group has their topic, you will meet together and each choose a role. Each role will research a different aspect of the movement:
    • The Artist from the Movement: You will imagine you are one of the artists who
    • is famous from this movement. You will discover what is going on in the world during
    • the time period of this movement. How does this influence the art you create? Why
    • do you create this kind of art? Why is this kind of art important?
    • The Art Historian: Art historians research different art movements to discover the style of the artwork. You will view famous pieces from this movement as well as research the historical context of this movement. You will determine: what is the artistic style of this movement? How are the elements of art used? Why are they used this way? How does the style of this movement fit with the historical context of the movement?
    • The Art Museum Curator: As an art museum curator, you are in charge of putting on an exhibition for this art movement. This “exhibit” will be this movement’s part in the mural. First, the museum curator must learn: who are the famous artists from this time? What are some famous pieces from this time? How do these pieces show the historical context and/or the style of the movement? After learning this, they can determine which pieces they would choose for their exhibit (our mural) and why?
    • Process Continued
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    •  
  • 5. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] 3. Once each person has chosen a role, we will begin our research on the internet. We will spend one class period researching. You are looking to answer the specific questions addressed in your role regarding your group’s particular art movement. Here are some helpful research links for each group: Expressionism: Web Museum 1 Web Museum 2 Art Movements Surrealism: Pop Subculture Surrealist.com Pop Art: Artchive.com World-Wide Art Resources Post-Painterly Abstraction: The-Artists.org Sharecom Minimalism: ArtLex Art Movements Process Continued     The Process (Continued)
  • 6. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • Ms. Supino will give each person a handout regarding his or her role. This handout lists all of the questions you will have to answer for your role in the group. You must have the handout filled out by the end of our research day. You do not have to use complete sentences.
    • The next class period after our research day, you will meet with your group. You will share the information you have found and will have all class period to put together your presentation. You must decide what each of you is going to say and who will go first, second, and third. Each person should talk about their own specific research to the class. You must have at least one visual aid in your presentation. This may be a PowerPoint presentation, a poster, a handout with images, etc. All of the websites listed on this WebQuest have links to images you may use. Make sure to cite your images. More than one visual aid will help your grade, and your visual aid should enhance your presentation. That is, you should talk about it, not just have it in the background the whole time! You may have a piece of paper with notes when you are presenting (you may want to use your research handout). Use this class time to practice! Your presentation does not have to be longer than 5 minutes.
    • On presentation day, each group will give their presentation to the class. You must listen to other groups’ presentations and jot down notes about what you learn.
    • After every group has given their presentation, we will have a class discussion. We will decide what are the interesting elements of each movement and decide which aspects and artwork we would like to include in our mural. We will brainstorm ideas!
    • The next class period, we will begin our mural! We will keep in mind everything that we have learned, and we will continue to work on the mural for the next week and a half. Our mural will proudly be displayed in the cafeteria!
    •  
    •  
    The Process (Continued)
  • 7. Evaluation Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Individual Research (This grade will be based upon the information filled out on your research handout) This group member fully addressed and answered all questions asked of their particular role. They may have also answered extra questions that were not asked of them in order to understand the context of their movement. All questions asked of the particular group member were addressed and researched. Not all questions asked of the group member were addressed. Few or none of the questions asked of the group member were addressed. Individual Part of Presentation The group member participated equally in speaking in the presentation. They were able to clearly express the research that they did for their particular role in a way that was understandable and interesting for the rest of the class. All information presented was correct. The group member participated equally in speaking in the presentation. They presented the research of their role clearly. Information presented is correct. The group member did not participate in speaking as much as the other group members. Information presented may have been unclear or incorrect. The group member participated much less than their group members. Their information was unclear and/or incorrect. Working in Groups The group member was responsible for their own research role and participated equally in presenting to the class. They came to group sessions prepared and helped their other group members. The group member was responsible for their own research role and participated equally in presenting to the class. They came to group sessions prepared. The group member was responsible for their own research role. They may not have participated equally in presenting to the class or may have come unprepared to group sessions. The group member was not fully responsible for their own research role. They did not participate equally in presenting to the class and often came unprepared to group sessions. Time Limit The presentation was 5-7 minutes in length. The presentation was a little too short (3-4 minutes) or a little too long (7-9 minutes.) The presentation was too short (2-3 minutes) or too long (9-10 minutes.) The presentation was much too short (1-2 minutes) or much too long (10 minutes or more.) Visual Aid (The visual aid may be a power point presentation, a poster, digital images, handouts, etc.) One or more visual aids were used in the entire group presentation. The visual aid enhanced the presentation. One visual aid was used throughout the entire group presentation. The visual aid enhanced the presentation. A visual aid was used, but was not addressed or did not enhance the presentation in any way. No visual aid was used throughout the entire presentation.
  • 8. Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Congratulations! Our research has helped us to really understand these more recent art movements! We will now officially begin to create our masterpiece, keeping in mind all that we have learned!
  • 9. Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Photos: Slide One: and 10 (Teacher Page): Andy Warhol - Marilyn 1967, screen-print on paper, 91.5 x 91.5 cm, museum of modern art, new york, Photograph by Flickr: oddsock http://flickr.com/photos/oddsock/100943517/ Slide Three: Photo by Flickr: June 6, 2007 by anna.hawaii http://flickr.com/photos/81292941@N00/533834883/ Websites: Pop Art http://www.artchive.com/artchive/pop_art.html http://wwar.com/masters/movements/pop_art.html Expressionism http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/tl/20th/expressionism.html http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/glo/expressionism/ http://www.artmovements.co.uk/expressionism.htm Surrealism http://www.popsubculture.com/pop/bio_project/surrealism.html http://www.surrealist.com/ Post-Painterly Abstraction http://the-artists.org/movement/Post_Painterly_Abstraction.html http://www.sharecom.ca/greenberg/ppaessay.html Minimalism http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/m/minimalism.html http://www.artmovements.co.uk/minimalism.htm Link to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group          
  • 10. Moving Through Art History! (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for9th grade art students Designed by Adriane Supino [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Andy Warhol - Marilyn 1967 screen-print on paper, 91.5 x 91.5 cm, museum of modern art, new york   Photograph by Flickr: oddsock
  • 11. Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was developed part of the Artegration Project in Saint Vrain Valley School District, an initiative to integrate art history, research and literacy in art programs. This lesson is essentially a research project for art students. The main goal at the end of this project is to produce a collaborative “timeline mural” that will show the progression of artistic movements throughout the 20 th century. Most art students, by the time they reach high school, have already learned about all of the classical movements; this gives them a chance to learn about something more recent. The movements chosen for this lesson are Expressionism, Surrealism, Pop Art, Post-Painterly Abstraction, and Minimalism. This particular class has 15 students, so they are broken up into 5 groups of three students. Each group researches one particular movement. Also, each member chooses their own role within the group (artist, art historian, or museum curator) and each of these roles has particular questions to address in their research. Finally, each group will present their research to the class, and after learning about all of the movements through these presentations, we will collaborate to create our mural! Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 12. Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is anchored in 9 th grade arts, but it involves research, reading, writing, group work, and presentation skills as well! Before beginning this lesson, students should know a bit about art history and various movements, though it is not completely necessary. Students should have prior experience looking at works of art and analyzing their style and merit. This lesson works well for high school students because many of them have already learned about classical art movements and are comfortable analyzing works of art and styles, but have not studied these particular styles. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 13. Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
      • .
    • This WebQuest addresses the following Colorado State Visual Arts Standards:
    • STANDARD 1: Students recognize and use the visual arts as a form of communication.
    •  
    • STANDARD 2: Students know and apply elements of art, principles of design, and sensory and expressive features of visual arts.
    •  
    • STANDARD 3: Students know and apply visual arts materials, tools, techniques, and processes.
    •  
    • STANDARD 4: Students relate the visual arts to various historical and cultural traditions.
    •  
    • STANDARD 5: Students analyze and evaluate the characteristics, merits, and meaning of works of art.
    • This lesson also encourages many other skills, including creative artistic expression, presentation skills, internet-based research (technology), literacy, and teamwork!
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 14. The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion To see the step by step process students go through in this lesson, click here! The time period of this lesson may vary for different teachers. In this particular case, the students spend one full class period (our class periods are 90 minutes each) on research. The teacher will prepare a handout with the questions asked of their research role. By the end of the research day, the student must have their handout completely filled out. The completeness of this handout ( I chose not to require complete sentences because it is research and notes) will help determine the “individual research” portion of their grade. The next class period, the students will have the entire class time to meet with their group and put together their presentation. They will decide what each person is going to say, what their visual aid will be, the order they will speak in, etc. I have chosen to give students this long period of time to work on their presentations, because it ensures that they have time to meet with their group and to practice. (If this were given as homework, some students might not be able to, or would choose not to, meet with their group or to practice.) The following class period, each group will give their presentation. We will listen and learn as a class. When all of the groups have given their presentations, we will have a class discussion on what we found interesting in each movement, what we want to include in our mural, how we will go about our mural, and what we will need to begin our mural. This gets our brains ready for the next class period when we will begin actually working on the mural! Working on the mural will probably last about five or six 90 minute class periods, but this may be longer or shorter depending on the size of your class. In my personal experience, this activity has been very enjoyable and helpful for students because they are not simply recreating classic works that they know nothing about. They get to learn about these movements, decide what they think is most interesting, and collaborate with their peers to create a pretty cool piece of art!
  • 15. Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • In order to implement this lesson, teachers will need:
      • Access to a computer lab, with enough computers for each student (15 in this case)
      • Internet Explorer, so that student can access the WebQuest and research
      • An art studio or art room
      • A color printer for students to print visual aids
      • Posters, markers, glue for presentations
      • A projector in case the students choose to do a PowerPoint presentation
      • Art supplies for the mural: large sheet of butcher paper, pencils, paint, markers, glitter, glue, charcoal, crayons, etc.
      • Overhead projector (to project images onto mural to be traced or imitated)
      • A prepared handout with the specific research questions each student must answer (In this case, 15 total handouts, 5 copies of each role)
    • For a complete list and links of the websites students will use in their research, click here!
    • This lesson is possible for one teacher to facilitate, however, he or she must be very organized and have good classroom management skills. Help of teacher aides or parent volunteers in facilitating this assignment would be helpful. Also, teachers are encouraged to also have available the other resources for research, such as art history books.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 16. Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page To see the rubric of how students will be evaluated, click here! Students will be evaluated on their individual efforts and contributions to the group, as well as their group presentation as a whole. It is recommended that the teacher go over the expectations of the rubric and how the students will be evaluated at the beginning of the lesson! Although the rubric is included as part of the student WebQuest, many students may quickly skip over this page. I have found that going over the rubric as a class and answering any questions helps to clear up misconceptions before they affect the students’ work and, in the end, the students are more likely to live up to your expectations! Make sure your expectations are clear to the students!!! Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 17. Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This WebQuest is fairly accessible to most all student populations. It may need to be adapted or facilitated differently for students with special needs, or English language learners. For English language learners, the pages should be left in English so that students can gain experience reading, writing, and speaking in English. However, these students may go to websites written in different languages, and may ask for help from a facilitator who speaks their native language. They will need support in both languages. To find websites written in Spanish, type in Expressionismo, Surrealismo, Arte Popular, Abstracción Postpictórica, and Minimalismo. A teacher or facilitator that speaks this language would need to decide which websites are more relevant than others. For special needs students, it really depends on the degree of needs the student has. The websites may be modified to reach different reading levels. The students may also need to print information off of the internet to read as some may have difficulty reading off of a computer screen. This page is linked to the Process segment off of the Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 18. Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page It’s been stated before in this WebQuest but it’s worth saying again, this is a great lesson for high school students! They get a chance to learn about more current art and see how society has moved through these art movements and how they affect art today! Also, students learn how society and current events affect art. In the end, the students have a better understanding of the movements and they get to decide which ones are interesting to them and which pieces of work they would like to use as influences for their mural. They get to collaborate with their peers both in the research aspect and the creative artistic aspect. This lesson combines research, literacy, presentation skills, teamwork, creative expression and more! I hope that you will use this lesson and modify it to fit your own students needs! I know they will enjoy it! Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 19. Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Photos: Slide One: and 10 (Teacher Page): Andy Warhol - Marilyn 1967, screen-print on paper, 91.5 x 91.5 cm, museum of modern art, new york, Photograph by Flickr: oddsock http://flickr.com/photos/oddsock/100943517/ Slide Three: Photo by Flickr: June 6, 2007 by anna.hawaii http://flickr.com/photos/81292941@N00/533834883/ Websites: Pop Art http://www.artchive.com/artchive/pop_art.html http://wwar.com/masters/movements/pop_art.html Expressionism http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/tl/20th/expressionism.html http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/glo/expressionism/ http://www.artmovements.co.uk/expressionism.htm Surrealism http://www.popsubculture.com/pop/bio_project/surrealism.html http://www.surrealist.com/ Post-Painterly Abstraction http://the-artists.org/movement/Post_Painterly_Abstraction.html http://www.sharecom.ca/greenberg/ppaessay.html Minimalism http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/m/minimalism.html http://www.artmovements.co.uk/minimalism.htm Link to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group