Fashionable innovation
Fashionable innovationAn-Sofie Vandelanotte
Fashionable innovationAn-Sofie VandelanotteLen Dierickx
Fashionable innovationAn-Sofie VandelanotteLen DierickxQuincy Cloet
Text goes here
1993: 2 hereText goesbrother in Switzerland
Messenger bagsText goes here
Messenger bagsText goes here       Post ers
Messenger bagsText goes here          Post ersTra n s p o r t by b i c yc l e
Messenger bagsText goes here          Post ersTra n s p o r t by b i c yc l e     Swiss climate
Recycled hereText goesmaterials
Unique TypographyText goes here
PrototypeText goes here
50+ ModelsText goes here
50+ ModelsText goes here
FRE1T4G       Text goes here140 Employees
FRE1T4G       Text goes here300.000 products
FRE1T4G        Text goes here390 ton tarp
FRE1T4G        Text goes here36.000 bicycle tubes
FRE1T4G        Text goes here220.000 seat belts
Fashion-industry contradicts sustainability             Text goes here’30           ’50         ’70         ’90         No...
Sustainable innovation:Text goes hereresources and processes are limited
Sustainable innovation:Text goes herefinancial, manufacturing, natural capital
Sustainable innovation: legislation andText goes herecompliance, social responsibility
Businesses spend too many ofText goes heretheir environmental dollars onfighting regulation and notenough on finding real so...
Good designText goes here
Good designText goes here        Invisible
Good designText goes here        Invisible  Solves a problem
Good designText goes here        Invisible  Solves a problem  Product life cycle
Marketing = product designText goes here
Production processText goes here
Production processText goes here      Hand made
Production processText goes here      Hand madeRecycled raw material
Production processText goes here      Hand madeRecycled raw material      Unique cut
Not goes hereText just fashion
Not goes hereText just fashion        VS
Zürich FREITAG factory:Text goes heresocial and ecological responsibility
Zürich FREITAG factory:Text goes heresocial and ecological responsibility   Re-use rainwater
Zürich FREITAG factory:    Text goes here    social and ecological responsibility       Re-use rainwaterRoof top garden fo...
Zürich FREITAG factory:    Text goes here    social and ecological responsibility       Re-use rainwaterRoof top garden fo...
User as innovatorText goes here
4 x goes hereTextP
4 x goes here TextPCustom designed product
4 x goes here    TextP   Custom designed productEco-friendly production process
4 x goes here     TextP   Custom designed productEco-friendly production processPositioned as functional f ashion
4 x goes here     TextP   Custom designed productEco-friendly production processPositioned as functional f ashion      Pro...
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Fashionable innovation-web

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  • Starting screen \n
  • Starting screen \n
  • Starting screen \n
  • We are presenting FREITAG\n
  • In 1993 two brothers from Zürich (Switzerland) developed a new product, successfully started a business and launched a cult brand out of a student project. Daniel and Markus Freitag created fashionable bags from truck tarp, bicycle tubes, seat belts and airbags in an attempt to solve a problem they themselves encountered every day. \n\n
  • As students in graphic design they needed a bag that could hold large sheets of paper (posters, graphic designs) and at the same time allow them to transport everything by bicycle or subway. The bags needed to be waterproof to withstand the Swiss climate, and strong and sturdy in order not to break while in traffic. The inspiration for the bags was drawn from the typical messenger bag used by urban bike couriers originally found during the fifties in New York. \nTheir educational background allowed them to see things differently than contemporary bag-producers and forced them to look for the right material in unexpected places. In an interview with Micheal Conrad (2011) they explain that they had no idea where to find such strong and waterproof materials and looked at what was available around them. They found trucks with tarpaulin protecting the goods they transported, seat belts and inner tubes from bicycles. Later on they added the material from used airbags. \n\n
  • As students in graphic design they needed a bag that could hold large sheets of paper (posters, graphic designs) and at the same time allow them to transport everything by bicycle or subway. The bags needed to be waterproof to withstand the Swiss climate, and strong and sturdy in order not to break while in traffic. The inspiration for the bags was drawn from the typical messenger bag used by urban bike couriers originally found during the fifties in New York. \nTheir educational background allowed them to see things differently than contemporary bag-producers and forced them to look for the right material in unexpected places. In an interview with Micheal Conrad (2011) they explain that they had no idea where to find such strong and waterproof materials and looked at what was available around them. They found trucks with tarpaulin protecting the goods they transported, seat belts and inner tubes from bicycles. Later on they added the material from used airbags. \n\n
  • As students in graphic design they needed a bag that could hold large sheets of paper (posters, graphic designs) and at the same time allow them to transport everything by bicycle or subway. The bags needed to be waterproof to withstand the Swiss climate, and strong and sturdy in order not to break while in traffic. The inspiration for the bags was drawn from the typical messenger bag used by urban bike couriers originally found during the fifties in New York. \nTheir educational background allowed them to see things differently than contemporary bag-producers and forced them to look for the right material in unexpected places. In an interview with Micheal Conrad (2011) they explain that they had no idea where to find such strong and waterproof materials and looked at what was available around them. They found trucks with tarpaulin protecting the goods they transported, seat belts and inner tubes from bicycles. Later on they added the material from used airbags. \n\n
  • They found trucks with tarpaulin protecting the goods they transported, seat belts and inner tubes from bicycles. Later on they added the material from used airbags. \n\n
  • The first messenger bag was created in their parents’ house. \n\n
  • They washed the tarp which smelled from the exhaust fumes, and used "Mom's" sewing machine to stitch up the pieces and create the first model of their Freeway-bag (Conrad, M., 2011). Each bag is unique because of the typographic pattern cut out of the tarpaulin. Even though the company expanded and today the Fundamentals line comprises over 40 models, each and every bag touts a unique pattern hand-cut from the same type of truck tarps the Freitag brothers seized in 1993.\n
  • Besides the original Freeway bag, the models on sale include iPad and laptop sleeves, backpacks, wallets, sports bags and a business bag aimed at finance professionals named after Alan Greenspan.\n\nNowadays the company produces around 57 different models (Freitag, D., 2012), \n
  • Nowadays the company produces around 57 different models (Freitag, D., 2012), processes 390 tons of truck tarp, 36000 bicycle tubes, 22000 seat belts and 1400 sq. recycled airbags. FREITAG employes 140 people around the world, most of them in the factory in Zürich. The nine stores are located in high profile cities such as New York, Tokyo, Davos and Vienna. The location of the stores is rather revealing and suggests a high-income customer segment.\n\n
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  • When people think of the fashion industry and everything it entails, they normally don’t make the link with sustainability. Fashion is an industry where trends change every season which is contradictory to the concept of sustainability which implies a much longer perspective, perhaps reaching into infinity (Koefoed, 2008: 61). FREITAG proves that the fashion-industry and the concept of sustainability do not have to be on the far end of the scale but that they can be reconciled with one another. \n\n
  • We found several definitions for the concept of sustainable innovation given by many experts. Kemp (1991) stated that sustainability on the one hand covers a stance towards the possibilities of future generations with all the difficulties that this perspective implies, and that on the other hand sustainability is about the connection to the present with a particular sensitivity, acutely aware of resources and processes. This definition can be situated more within the ecological or environmental sustainability.\n\n
  • There is also the concept of sustainable business, which according to Lovins, Hawkins and Lovins (2008) should include the sustainable development and use, of, at least, the following four types of capital: financial, manufacturing, natural and human. \n\n
  • M. de Brito et al. has identified three main drives towards sustainability in fashion business: compliance with legislation, the attempt to obtain a competitive advantage and the impact of Corporate Social Responsibility in companies over the last decade (de Brito et al, 2008). \n\n
  • These definitions are reconciled by Michael E. Porter in his paper “Green and Competitive: Ending the Stalemate”. He shows that in some cases environmental regulations can be effective and force companies to use resources more effectively as well as gain competitive advantages such as reduced production costs and early-mover advantages. Companies should focus on the production process itself, instead of favoring end-of-pipe solutions like secondary waste treatment. \n\n
  • - Good design is invisible. Consider the products produced by FREITAG: a person that does not know that the brand is using old truck tarps, bicycle tubes or seat-belts will just see a bag that answers to the special needs of certain professions. \n- Good design solves a problem. What she means here is that the industry, instead of creating waste and polluting the environment, should look for a way to either evade those issues or put them to their use. FREITAG uses materials to create products that are otherwise difficult to recycle or use again.\n- Good design considers the life cycle of the product. A producer considers how long his product will last, whether it can be reused at the end of its lifecycle. \nFREITAG shows that it is possible to deliver a fashionable product while considering the full life-cycle of the production process and making that process as eco-friendly and efficient as possible. Even though the raw materials used in their final products cannot be seen as eco-friendly materials, they avoid to create more waste and give a second life to those materials. \n\n
  • - Good design is invisible. Consider the products produced by FREITAG: a person that does not know that the brand is using old truck tarps, bicycle tubes or seat-belts will just see a bag that answers to the special needs of certain professions. \n- Good design solves a problem. What she means here is that the industry, instead of creating waste and polluting the environment, should look for a way to either evade those issues or put them to their use. FREITAG uses materials to create products that are otherwise difficult to recycle or use again.\n- Good design considers the life cycle of the product. A producer considers how long his product will last, whether it can be reused at the end of its lifecycle. \nFREITAG shows that it is possible to deliver a fashionable product while considering the full life-cycle of the production process and making that process as eco-friendly and efficient as possible. Even though the raw materials used in their final products cannot be seen as eco-friendly materials, they avoid to create more waste and give a second life to those materials. \n\n
  • - Good design is invisible. Consider the products produced by FREITAG: a person that does not know that the brand is using old truck tarps, bicycle tubes or seat-belts will just see a bag that answers to the special needs of certain professions. \n- Good design solves a problem. What she means here is that the industry, instead of creating waste and polluting the environment, should look for a way to either evade those issues or put them to their use. FREITAG uses materials to create products that are otherwise difficult to recycle or use again.\n- Good design considers the life cycle of the product. A producer considers how long his product will last, whether it can be reused at the end of its lifecycle. \nFREITAG shows that it is possible to deliver a fashionable product while considering the full life-cycle of the production process and making that process as eco-friendly and efficient as possible. Even though the raw materials used in their final products cannot be seen as eco-friendly materials, they avoid to create more waste and give a second life to those materials. \n\n
  • FREITAGs business model revolves around a product and the message it communicates. The brand and the bag express several messages attracting similar customers: eco-friendly (production process / factory), typography as a unique element, strong and sturdy materials, the bags smell from the exhaust fumes, mid-range price level for fashion bags.\n\nEvery material used in the hand-made manufacturing had, in other words, a different purpose in the past but was recycled to be part of a completely new product. Although FREITAG has not revolutionized the idea of the messenger bag, and uses existing materials, it has brought materials from a whole different context into its production process. It both saves costs by recycling old tarpaulin and also helps the environment by reducing the amount of waste.\n\n
  • n the process of creating the products, it is interesting to note that FREITAG only creates hand-made products and does not rely on automated machinery to speed up the production. Every truck tarpaulin also has unique characteristics (colors, texture, logo, etc.) and therefore every messenger bag is one-of-a-kind piece. The idea of creating hand-made bags is certainly not new but doing it on a larger scale and selling the products over all the world, makes it a quite radical type of process innovation unseen in the industry.\n\nEach product has a unique typographic pattern and is hand made. This requires specific employees with specific skills in deciding which part of the tarpaulin to cut and which tarpaulin to buy. Finding transport companies who are willing to sell their tarpaulin and inevitably seeing their brand reused in a fashion item looks like one the main challenges they have, especially in a company that now produces over around 1150 bags per working day.\n\n
  • n the process of creating the products, it is interesting to note that FREITAG only creates hand-made products and does not rely on automated machinery to speed up the production. Every truck tarpaulin also has unique characteristics (colors, texture, logo, etc.) and therefore every messenger bag is one-of-a-kind piece. The idea of creating hand-made bags is certainly not new but doing it on a larger scale and selling the products over all the world, makes it a quite radical type of process innovation unseen in the industry.\n\nEach product has a unique typographic pattern and is hand made. This requires specific employees with specific skills in deciding which part of the tarpaulin to cut and which tarpaulin to buy. Finding transport companies who are willing to sell their tarpaulin and inevitably seeing their brand reused in a fashion item looks like one the main challenges they have, especially in a company that now produces over around 1150 bags per working day.\n\n
  • n the process of creating the products, it is interesting to note that FREITAG only creates hand-made products and does not rely on automated machinery to speed up the production. Every truck tarpaulin also has unique characteristics (colors, texture, logo, etc.) and therefore every messenger bag is one-of-a-kind piece. The idea of creating hand-made bags is certainly not new but doing it on a larger scale and selling the products over all the world, makes it a quite radical type of process innovation unseen in the industry.\n\nEach product has a unique typographic pattern and is hand made. This requires specific employees with specific skills in deciding which part of the tarpaulin to cut and which tarpaulin to buy. Finding transport companies who are willing to sell their tarpaulin and inevitably seeing their brand reused in a fashion item looks like one the main challenges they have, especially in a company that now produces over around 1150 bags per working day.\n\n
  • The customer segment is willing to pay more for a unique and eco-friendly bag. The bags smells from the exhaust fumes and thus cannot really be classified as a luxury fashion item such as a Louis Vuitton bag.\n
  • All these choices give the impression that FREITAG uses a different mental model than the average enterprise, because it is much more aware of the social and ecological responsibility a company has. The idea of making bags but also thinking in a green and clean way has penetrated all its organizational levels and shows the company uses its own paradigm. This can be observed in their choice of location for production: an old contaminated factory site that has been cleaned and renovated so it fits the purpose of creating sustainable products. It is also reflected in the eco-friendly way they promote their bags in clothing stores.\n\n
  • All these choices give the impression that FREITAG uses a different mental model than the average enterprise, because it is much more aware of the social and ecological responsibility a company has. The idea of making bags but also thinking in a green and clean way has penetrated all its organizational levels and shows the company uses its own paradigm. This can be observed in their choice of location for production: an old contaminated factory site that has been cleaned and renovated so it fits the purpose of creating sustainable products. It is also reflected in the eco-friendly way they promote their bags in clothing stores.\n\n
  • All these choices give the impression that FREITAG uses a different mental model than the average enterprise, because it is much more aware of the social and ecological responsibility a company has. The idea of making bags but also thinking in a green and clean way has penetrated all its organizational levels and shows the company uses its own paradigm. This can be observed in their choice of location for production: an old contaminated factory site that has been cleaned and renovated so it fits the purpose of creating sustainable products. It is also reflected in the eco-friendly way they promote their bags in clothing stores.\n\n
  • The Freitag brothers themselves were the lead users, or “users as innovators”, that looked for a radical solution to their specific problems. However, they also used an incremental approach by looking at others (on the market) and checking what was missing at the moment. Their quality function deployment showed that the main elements that make a good bag are strength, space and durableness. On the basis of their observations, they decided to make a bag that fits these elements. Subsequently, it proved also interesting to release their product to the wider consumer market.\n\n
  • FREITAG started in 1993 and and more than 10 years later sells over 300.000 fashion items worldwide. Mixing an eco-friendly production and, unique and custom made product designs allowed FREITAG to portray itself as an eco-conscious company. This concept, the product is the message, was rather new to the fashion industry and even though FREITAG is still a small company, several copy-cats tried to sell similar bags (“Tonnerstag” in Switzerland) but eventually failed due to the lack of credibility, something which FREITAG had built over the past 10 years. This company shows that being innovative in an environmentally friendly and thus sustainable way, provides a clear competitive advantage towards competitors who merely use end-of-pipe solutions and add-on marketing messages.\n\n
  • FREITAG started in 1993 and and more than 10 years later sells over 300.000 fashion items worldwide. Mixing an eco-friendly production and, unique and custom made product designs allowed FREITAG to portray itself as an eco-conscious company. This concept, the product is the message, was rather new to the fashion industry and even though FREITAG is still a small company, several copy-cats tried to sell similar bags (“Tonnerstag” in Switzerland) but eventually failed due to the lack of credibility, something which FREITAG had built over the past 10 years. This company shows that being innovative in an environmentally friendly and thus sustainable way, provides a clear competitive advantage towards competitors who merely use end-of-pipe solutions and add-on marketing messages.\n\n
  • FREITAG started in 1993 and and more than 10 years later sells over 300.000 fashion items worldwide. Mixing an eco-friendly production and, unique and custom made product designs allowed FREITAG to portray itself as an eco-conscious company. This concept, the product is the message, was rather new to the fashion industry and even though FREITAG is still a small company, several copy-cats tried to sell similar bags (“Tonnerstag” in Switzerland) but eventually failed due to the lack of credibility, something which FREITAG had built over the past 10 years. This company shows that being innovative in an environmentally friendly and thus sustainable way, provides a clear competitive advantage towards competitors who merely use end-of-pipe solutions and add-on marketing messages.\n\n
  • FREITAG started in 1993 and and more than 10 years later sells over 300.000 fashion items worldwide. Mixing an eco-friendly production and, unique and custom made product designs allowed FREITAG to portray itself as an eco-conscious company. This concept, the product is the message, was rather new to the fashion industry and even though FREITAG is still a small company, several copy-cats tried to sell similar bags (“Tonnerstag” in Switzerland) but eventually failed due to the lack of credibility, something which FREITAG had built over the past 10 years. This company shows that being innovative in an environmentally friendly and thus sustainable way, provides a clear competitive advantage towards competitors who merely use end-of-pipe solutions and add-on marketing messages.\n\n
  • Starting screen \n
  • Starting screen \n
  • Starting screen \n
  • Fashionable innovation-web

    1. 1. Fashionable innovation
    2. 2. Fashionable innovationAn-Sofie Vandelanotte
    3. 3. Fashionable innovationAn-Sofie VandelanotteLen Dierickx
    4. 4. Fashionable innovationAn-Sofie VandelanotteLen DierickxQuincy Cloet
    5. 5. Text goes here
    6. 6. 1993: 2 hereText goesbrother in Switzerland
    7. 7. Messenger bagsText goes here
    8. 8. Messenger bagsText goes here Post ers
    9. 9. Messenger bagsText goes here Post ersTra n s p o r t by b i c yc l e
    10. 10. Messenger bagsText goes here Post ersTra n s p o r t by b i c yc l e Swiss climate
    11. 11. Recycled hereText goesmaterials
    12. 12. Unique TypographyText goes here
    13. 13. PrototypeText goes here
    14. 14. 50+ ModelsText goes here
    15. 15. 50+ ModelsText goes here
    16. 16. FRE1T4G Text goes here140 Employees
    17. 17. FRE1T4G Text goes here300.000 products
    18. 18. FRE1T4G Text goes here390 ton tarp
    19. 19. FRE1T4G Text goes here36.000 bicycle tubes
    20. 20. FRE1T4G Text goes here220.000 seat belts
    21. 21. Fashion-industry contradicts sustainability Text goes here’30 ’50 ’70 ’90 Now ∞ ’40 ’60 ’80 ’00
    22. 22. Sustainable innovation:Text goes hereresources and processes are limited
    23. 23. Sustainable innovation:Text goes herefinancial, manufacturing, natural capital
    24. 24. Sustainable innovation: legislation andText goes herecompliance, social responsibility
    25. 25. Businesses spend too many ofText goes heretheir environmental dollars onfighting regulation and notenough on finding real solutions
    26. 26. Good designText goes here
    27. 27. Good designText goes here Invisible
    28. 28. Good designText goes here Invisible Solves a problem
    29. 29. Good designText goes here Invisible Solves a problem Product life cycle
    30. 30. Marketing = product designText goes here
    31. 31. Production processText goes here
    32. 32. Production processText goes here Hand made
    33. 33. Production processText goes here Hand madeRecycled raw material
    34. 34. Production processText goes here Hand madeRecycled raw material Unique cut
    35. 35. Not goes hereText just fashion
    36. 36. Not goes hereText just fashion VS
    37. 37. Zürich FREITAG factory:Text goes heresocial and ecological responsibility
    38. 38. Zürich FREITAG factory:Text goes heresocial and ecological responsibility Re-use rainwater
    39. 39. Zürich FREITAG factory: Text goes here social and ecological responsibility Re-use rainwaterRoof top garden for insulation
    40. 40. Zürich FREITAG factory: Text goes here social and ecological responsibility Re-use rainwaterRoof top garden for insulationRe-use heat from used water
    41. 41. User as innovatorText goes here
    42. 42. 4 x goes hereTextP
    43. 43. 4 x goes here TextPCustom designed product
    44. 44. 4 x goes here TextP Custom designed productEco-friendly production process
    45. 45. 4 x goes here TextP Custom designed productEco-friendly production processPositioned as functional f ashion
    46. 46. 4 x goes here TextP Custom designed productEco-friendly production processPositioned as functional f ashion Process innovation
    47. 47. Thank you for listening
    48. 48. Thank you for listeningQuestions?
    49. 49. Thank you for listeningQuestions?Slides: url here
    50. 50. Thank you for listeningQuestions?Slides: url herePaper: url here

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