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The Ares Projects: Back to the Future
 

The Ares Projects: Back to the Future

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Presentation by Steve Cook at the AAS Von Braun Memorial Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama, 21 October 2008. ...

Presentation by Steve Cook at the AAS Von Braun Memorial Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama, 21 October 2008.

http://astronautical.org/vonbraun/vonbraun-2008/session1

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  • Ambassador Plus Briefing Script v0608 Welcome, and thank you for taking this time with me. I would like to share with you some of the exciting things being done by your space program.

The Ares Projects: Back to the Future The Ares Projects: Back to the Future Presentation Transcript

  • The Ares Projects: Back to the Future Steve Cook Manager, Ares Projects American Astronautical Society Wernher von Braun Memorial Symposium October 21, 2008 National Aeronautics and Space Administration
  • Topics
    • NASA’s mission
    • Ares Projects design considerations
    • Vehicle overviews
    • Ares Projects progress
    7614 . National Aeronautics and Space Administration
  • NASA’s Mission 7614 . National Aeronautics and Space Administration “ The next steps in returning to the Moon and moving onward to Mars, the near-Earth asteroids, and beyond, are crucial in deciding the course of future space exploration. We must understand that these steps are incremental, cumulative, and incredibly powerful in their ultimate effect.” – NASA Administrator Michael Griffin October 24, 2006
    • Safely fly the Space Shuttle until 2010
    • Complete the International Space Station (ISS)
    • Develop a balanced program of science, exploration, and aeronautics
    • Develop and fly the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV)
      • Designed for exploration but will initially service ISS
    • Land on the Moon no later than 2020
    • Promote international and commercial participation in exploration
  • Ares Projects Design Considerations
    • Assume little to no “new money” for development
      • Funding for heavy-lift development not available until Shuttle retirement
    • Use reliable, proven heritage systems and infrastructure
      • Vehicle systems
      • Manufacturing processes
      • Experienced personnel
    • Incorporate new technologies as needed, appropriate, or affordable
    • Separate crew from cargo
    • Use a single “stick” configuration for the Ares I crew launch vehicle
      • Crew on top instead of on the side of the launch vehicle
    • Design in a crew escape system for increased safety
    7614 . National Aeronautics and Space Administration
  • The Constellation Program Exploration Fleet Altair Lunar Lander Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle Earth Departure Stage National Aeronautics and Space Administration
  • Building on a Foundation of Proven Technologies - Launch Vehicle Comparisons - 7614 . National Aeronautics and Space Administration Earth Departure Stage (EDS) (1 J-2X) 253.0 mT (557.7K lbm) LOX/LH 2 Core Stage (6 RS-68 Engines) 1,587.3 mT (3,499.5K lbm) LOX/LH 2 Crew Lunar Lander Altair 5-Segment Reusable Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) Space Shuttle Ares I Ares V Saturn V 2 5.5-Segment RSRBs Orion DAC 2 TR 6 LV 51.00.48 S-IVB (1 J-2 engine) 108.9 mT (240.0K LOX/LH 2 S-II (5 J-2 engines) 453.6 mT (1,000.0K lbm) LOX/LH 2 S-IC (5 F-1) 1,769.0 mT (3,900.0K lbm) LOX/RP-1 Height: 110.9 m (364 ft) Gross Liftoff Mass: 2,948.4 mT (6,500K lbm) Payload Capability: 44.9 mT (99K lbm) to TLI 118.8 mT (262K lbm) to LEO Upper Stage (1 J-2X) 137.0 mT (302K lbm) LOX/LH 2 Height: 99.1 m (325 ft) Gross Liftoff Mass: 927.1 mT (2,044.0K lbm) Payload Capability: 25.5 mT (56.2K lbm) to LEO Height: 56.1 m (184.2 ft) Gross Liftoff Mass: 2,041.1 mT (4,500.0K lbm) Payload Capability: 25.0 mT (55.1K lbm) to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Overall Vehicle Height, m (ft) 122 m (400 ft) 91 m (300 ft) 61 m (200 ft) 30 m (100 ft) 0 Height: 116.2 m (381.1 ft) Gross Liftoff Mass: 3,704.5 mT (8,167.1K lbm) Payload Capability: 71.1 mT (156.7K lbm) to TLI (with Ares I) 62.8 mT (138.5K lbm) to Direct TLI ~187.7 mT (413.8K lbm) to LEO
  • Ares I Elements 7614 . National Aeronautics and Space Administration
    • First Stage
    • Derived from current Shuttle RSRM/B
    • Five segments/Polybutadiene
    • Acrylonitrile (PBAN) propellant
    • Recoverable
    • New forward adapter
    • Avionics upgrades
    • ATK Launch Systems ($1.8B)
    • Upper Stage Engine
    • Saturn J-2 derived engine (J-2X)
    • Expendable
    • Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne ($1.2B)
    Orion CEV Interstage
    • Instrument Unit
    • Primary Ares I control
    • avionics system
    • NASA Design /
    • Boeing Production ($0.8B)
    DAC 2 TR 6 Encapsulated Service Module (ESM) Panels
    • Upper Stage
    • 137.1 mT (302.2K lbm) LOX/LH 2 prop
    • 5.5-m (18-ft) diameter
    • Aluminum-Lithium (Al-Li) structures
    • Instrument unit and interstage
    • Reaction Control System (RCS) / roll
    • control for first stage flight
    • Primary Ares I control avionics system
    • NASA Design / Boeing Production ($1.12B)
    • Stack Integration
    • 927.1 mT (2,044.0K lbm) gross liftoff mass (GLOM)
    • 99.1 m (325.0 ft) in length
    • NASA-led
  • Ares V Elements 7614 . National Aeronautics and Space Administration Altair Lunar Lander Interstage EDS J-2X Payload Fairing RS-68 Loiter Skirt
    • Stack Integration
    • 3,704.5 mT ( 8,167.1K lbm) gross liftoff mass
    • 116.2 m (381.1 ft) in length
    • Earth Departure Stage (EDS)
    • One Saturn-derived J-2X LOX/LH 2 engine (expendable)
    • 10-m (33-ft) diameter stage
    • Aluminum-Lithium (Al-Li) tanks
    • Composite structures, instrument unit and interstage
    • Primary Ares V avionics system
    • Core Stage
    • Six Delta IV-derived RS-68 LOX/LH 2 engines (expendable)
    • 10-m (33-ft) diameter stage
    • Composite structures
    • Aluminum-Lithium (Al-Li) tanks
    LV 51.00.48
    • Solid Rocket Boosters
    • Two recoverable 5.5-segment PBAN-fueled boosters (derived from current Ares I first stage)
  • Ares V Element Heritage 7614 . National Aeronautics and Space Administration USAF RS-68B From Delta IV RS-68 Ares V Ares I First Stage (5-Segment RSRB) J-2X Upper Stage Engine Upper Stage Derived Vehicle Systems 71.1 t (156.7K lbm) to TLI (with Ares I) 63.0 t (138.5K lbm) to Direct TLI 187.7 t (413.8K lbm) to LEO 25.5 t (56.2K lbm) to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Elements from RSRB Delta IV
  • Ares V Utilization Studies
    • NASA has begun preliminary concept work on vehicle
    • Focused on design of EDS, payload shroud, core stage, and RS-68 core stage engines
    • Recent point-of-departure updated for additional performance margin using an additional RS-68 and an added 1/2 segment on the first stage
    • Shroud size dictated by eventual size of Altair lunar lander
    • Also investigating alternate uses for Ares V not related to human space exploration
      • Very large (8-meter aperture) science telescopes in low-Earth or Lagrange (L2) orbits
      • Capabilities could exceed Hubble by an order of magnitude
    7614 . National Aeronautics and Space Administration
  • Vehicle Integration Accomplishments Ares 4% Model Aeroacoustices Wind Tunnel Test Ames research Center, CA Ares 1% Model Transonic Wind Tunnel Test Langley Research Center, VA Dynamic Test Stand Renovations Marshall Space Flight Center, AL Ares PDR Complete
  • First Stage Accomplishments First Stage DM-1 Nozzle Fabrication Promontory, UT First Stage Fin Installation and Removal Testing Promontory,UT First Stage Forward Segment Propellant Casting Promontory, UT First Stage Forward Core Fin Removal Promontory, UT
  • Upper Stage Accomplishments DELMIA Simulation of Interstage Mock-Up Marshall Space Flight Center, AL MPTA Manufacturing Process with DELMIA Simulation Overlays Marshall Space Flight Center, AL Dome Gore Panel Chemical Milling Los Angeles, CA First FSW Demonstration Weld of Dome Gore Panels Marshall Space Flight Center, AL
  • Upper Stage Engine Accomplishments J-2X Powerpack Removal from A-1 Test Stand Stennis Space Center, MS J-2X Workhorse Gas Generator Manufacturing Canoga Park, CA J-2X Powerpack 1A Testing Stennis Space Center, MS E3 Subscale Diffuser Test Stennis Space Center, MS
    • First Ares I flight test (uncrewed)
    • Will demonstrate ascent, separation, roll control, recovery, and ground capabilities
    • Uses off-the-shelf, active, and simulator hardware
      • First stage propulsion, avionics, and roll control active systems
      • First stage forward structures, upper stage, Orion crew exploration vehicle, and Launch Abort System (LAS) instrumented mass simulator hardware
    • Holding flight hardware deliveries to July 11, 2009 launch date
    • Launch date could be delayed due to availability of Mobile Launcher
    Ares I-X Test Flight National Aeronautics and Space Administration 7593.
  • Ares I-X Accomplishments Upper Stage Simulator Assembly Glenn Research Center (GRC), OH Roll Control System Test and Fabrication Huntsville, AL and WSTF, NM Forward Frustum Fabrication Indianapolis, IN First Stage Actuator Systems Testing Marshall Space Flight Center, AL
  • Summary
    • The Constellation Program renews the nation’s commitment to human space exploration
      • Access to ISS
      • Human explorers to the Moon and beyond
      • Large telescopes and other hardware to LEO
    • Hardware is being built today
    • Development made easier by applying lessons learned from 50 years of spaceflight experience
    • Ares V heavy-lift capability will be a strategic asset for the nation
    • Constellation provides a means for world leadership through inspiration and strategic capability
    7614 . National Aeronautics and Space Administration
  • 7614 . SMDC_Briefing . National Aeronautics and Space Administration www.nasa.gov/ares