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Exploration: An Industry Perspective

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Presentation by Jim Chilton (Vice President and Program Manager, Exploration Launch Systems, Boeing) at the Von Braun Memorial Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama, 22 October 2008. …

Presentation by Jim Chilton (Vice President and Program Manager, Exploration Launch Systems, Boeing) at the Von Braun Memorial Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama, 22 October 2008.

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    • 1. Exploration: An Industry Perspective Jim Chilton Vice President and Program Manager Exploration Launch Systems October 22, 2008
    • 2. Considerations
      • The Apollo Legacy
      • Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS)
      • Challenges of the Post Apollo-Shuttle-ISS Era
      • Looking Ahead to Global Cooperation
    • 3. NASA Percentage of Federal Budget Data: http://www.gpoaccess.gov/usbudget/fy08/hist.html , NASA History Office, http://thomas.loc.gov/ Nixon Ford Carter Reagan Bush G.W. Bush Clinton Johnson 0.00% 0.50% 1.00% 1.50% 2.00% 2.50% 3.00% 3.50% 4.00% 4.50% 5.00% 1955 1965 1975 1985 1995 2005 Eisenhower Kennedy
    • 4. Public Support for Apollo 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 Apollo Worth Cost Approve of Apollo Spending Too Much on Space
    • 5. Should the Government Fund Human Trips to the Moon? 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Jun ‘61 Feb ‘65 Oct ‘65 Jul ‘67 Apr ‘70 Jul ‘79 Jul ‘94 Jul ‘95 Jun ’99 Jul ‘03 Dec ‘03 Jan ‘04 Jul ‘04 Percentage of the American Public (%) Favor Oppose
    • 6. Harris Poll - 4/10/2007
      • If spending had to be cut on federal programs, which two federal programs do you think the cuts should come from?
      1 * 2 1 Medicare 2 * 3 2 Social Security 2 1 4 3 Education 2 3 6 4 Medicaid 9 9 16 11 Transportation 21 14 3 12 Homeland Security 14 7 30 16 Environmental programs 22 25 29 24 Farm subsidies 28 45 8 28 Defense spending 29 18 43 28 Welfare 49 58 44 51 Space program Independent % Democrat % Republican % Total % Program
    • 7. Post-Apollo Progress Will Influence Exploration
      • Industry has developed space capability
      • Robotic exploration and the great observatories have captured public attention
      • The international arena has changed, with more space-faring nations emerging
      • Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) have advanced our capacity for human space flight
    • 8. Space Shuttle: A Magnificent Vehicle
      • Launches like a rocket, maneuvers on orbit like a spacecraft and lands like an airplane
      • First spacecraft in history to carry large satellites both to and from orbit
      • Supports mission durations up to longest of 17.5 days
      • Carried crews ranging from 2 to 8 people
      • Has carried more than 600 crew and more than 3,000,000 lbs. of cargo to orbit
      • Since 1992, number of problems experienced during operations decreased by 70% while operating costs were reduced by 40%
    • 9. The Shuttle-Mir Program Early Lessons in Station Cooperation
    • 10. International Space Station An International Integration Achievement More than 100,000 personnel from over 500 contractor facilities in 37 States and 16 Countries Multiple Flights per Year
      • Training
      • 2.5 years/crewmember
      • 12 to 16 US crew/year
      1,000,000 lbs. of Hardware On-Orbit at Completion Multiple Facilities Active 14.5 Fully Loaded Trucks 100,000+ Lbs./Year of Resupply Cargo 16 Nations Russian and US Control Centers >40 Major Suppliers from >20 States Five Types of Vehicles 10+ Types of Shuttle Carriers
    • 11. The First Two Elements…
      • …were never closer together on earth than approximately 5,000 miles
    • 12. Russia – Zvezda Service Module
    • 13. European Space Agency Columbus Lab
    • 14. Canada Canadarm2 and Dextre
    • 15. Japan Two Kibo Pressurized Elements
    • 16. Coming Together… Kibo Japan Columbus ESA Dextre Canada
    • 17. ISS Current Configuration
    • 18. At Assembly Complete
      • 43 space flights will have been conducted on three different types of launch vehicles over a five-year period
      • ISS will be larger than a five-bedroom house
      • ISS will generate 19.5Kwatts of power at its peak - enough to recharge its batteries and still provide enough power for 135 average homes
      • 1.5 million lines of flight software code will run on 44 computers with 100 data networks transferring 400,000 signals
      • 120 telephone-booth size rack facilities will be installed for operating spacecraft systems and research experiments
    • 19. Heads of ISS Agencies Canada, Europe, Japan, Russia, United States
      • The heads of the International Space Station (ISS) agencies from Canada, Europe, Japan, Russia and the United States met at European Space Agency (ESA) Headquarters in Paris on July 17, 2008, to review ISS cooperation
    • 20. Award-Winning Results
      • Aviation Week & Space Technology Space Laureate Award, 2002
      • AIAA’s von Karman Lectureship in Astronautics Award, 2003
      • AIAA’s Space Systems Award, 2001
      • The Space Foundation’s Space Achievement Award, 1999
      • ESA Prince of Astrius Award for International Cooperation, 2001
      • Discovery Channel’s Ten Greatest Engineering Achievements, 2002
      • Popular Science’s Best of What’s New Award, 1998
      Looking back, we see ISS as the world sees it – an engineering marvel Peggy Whitson, Expedition 5 NASA ISS Science Officer, looks back at the International Space Station through a window on the Space Shuttle Endeavour.
    • 21. Similar Changes Lie Ahead
      • NASA’s priorities
      • Advocacy and competition for resources
      • Changing business models and partnerships
      Copyright © 2008 Boeing. All rights reserved.
    • 22. The Challenges Are Different Apollo Ares
      • Computational Capabilities
      • Technology
      • Unknown Environments
      • Physics
      • Minimizing Life-cycle Cost
      • Low Rate Production
      • Environmentally-Friendly Manufacturing
      • Designing for Sustainability
    • 23. Transition Challenges
      • People:
        • Blending HSF and ‘new’ cultures
        • Integrating new engineering talent
        • Apply legacy designs and lessons learned
      • Approaches
        • Inclusion Of ‘External’ Capabilities
        • New NASA operating model
      • Funding
        • Stable Funding
        • Continuous advocacy
    • 24. Industry Will Be Sharing Commercial, Space and Military Experience
      • Production Expertise
      • Supplier Base
      • Buying Power
      • Enterprise Tools, IP
      • Safety & Operability
      737, 777, 787… Ares I
      • Production Expertise
      • Supplier Base
      • Buying Approaches
      • Tools & IP
      • Safety & Operability
      737, 777, 787… Delta II/Delta IV, STS, ISS, C-17, F-18, Chinook, Satellites, Missile Defense…
      • Human Space Flight Experience
      • Production Lessons Learned
      • Supplier Base Access
      • Cryo-Rocket Lessons-lived
      Ares I
    • 25. NASA and Industry Partnership
      • NASA Roles
      • Program Management
      • Requirements Development
      • Design
      • Interface Control
      • Assembly Facilities
      • Operations & Maintenance
      Strong Partnership
      • Industry Roles
      • Producibility Engineering
      • Engineering Support
      • Supplier Management
      • Manufacturing & Assembly
      • Integration & Test
      • Logistics
      NASA and Industry will be working together in new ways
    • 26. Global Governmental Cooperation For Exploration
      • January 2004: U.S. Vision for Space Exploration
      • April 2006: International Dialogue Initiated
      • May 2007: Global Exploration Strategy Released
      • November 2007: International Space Exploration Coordination Group Formed
      • July 2008: International Lunar Network Formed
      • September 2008: NASA-ESA Comparative Architecture Assessment Complete
      • November 2008: ESA Ministerial Council
    • 27. A Global Effort
      • Canada
      • CSA
      • UK
      • BNSC
      • France
      • CNES
      • Italy
      • ASI
      • Ukraine
      • NSAU
      • Russia
      • Roscosmos
      • Japan
      • JAXA
      • India
      • ISRO
      • China
      • CNSA
      • Australia
      • CSIRO
      • Germany
      • DRL
      • Korea
      • KARI
      • US
      • NASA
      ESA
    • 28. We Will Compete and Cooperate
              • Competition: Identifying the best solution
              • Cooperation: Pooling resources
              • Respect: For the challenges inherent in both
      Goal: Sustained Progress and Advocacy Copyright © 2008 Boeing. All rights reserved.
    • 29. “ No Pessimist ever discovered the secrets of the stars .. or sailed to an uncharted land … or opened a new heaven to the human spirit” Helen Keller

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