Science with Hinode

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Hinode space satellite observing the Sun.

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Science with Hinode

  1. 1. Science with Hinode First internal Hinode Meeting, MSSL, Sep 7 th , 2009 Santiago Vargas Domínguez
  2. 2. I. Small magnetic elements from the photosphere to the low chromosphere <ul><li>They are ubiquitous bright points of magnetic field concentration, spread all over the solar surface in: </li></ul><ul><li>Network: Nearly vertical magnetic field ~100 G </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>AR and frontiers of supergranules </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Inter-Network: Ho r izontal trend (20 G or less) </li></ul>Diffraction limit and high cadence observations are important since these structures are tiny and highly dynamic. Understanding the formation and structure is fundamental to figure out the role of these magnetic elements on solar irradiance.
  3. 3. Quiet Sun
  4. 4. Active region
  5. 5. Small magnetic elements from the photosphere to the low chromosphere
  6. 6. Small magnetic elements from the photosphere to the low chromosphere These MBP represent a significant area, are highly dynamic and evolve through fragmentation, merging and cancellation. Gband Magnetogram
  7. 7. MBP properties
  8. 8. Small magnetic elements from the photosphere to the low chromosphere Mag CN Gband
  9. 9. Small magnetic elements from the photosphere to the low chromosphere Mag Gband CN CaIIH Photospheric vortex-type event evidenced by magnetic field rotation. Small whirlpools in the Sun, with a size similar to the terrestial hurricanes (~<0.5Mm) (Bonet et al. 2007) 1000 km ~ 4000 km
  10. 10. Small magnetic elements from the photosphere to the low chromosphere mag Gband CN CaIIH Understand how small-scale events can affect the upper layers. ~ 4000 km - Reconnection with pre-existing magnetic fields. - Twisting of emerging flux as affected by convective motions
  11. 11. II. Solar active regions and their interaction with the surrounding granulation Magnetic field inhibits convection Transition from pores into sunspots ? Formation and decay of sunspots: Modalities of interaction between high ionized plasma and magnetic fields. Not a consensus for sub-photospheric flows responsible for the formation of solar pores.
  12. 12. Solar active regions and their interaction with the surrounding granulation
  13. 13. Solar active regions and their interaction with the surrounding granulation
  14. 14. Solar active regions and their interaction with the surrounding granulation Bipolar Moving Magnetic Features streaming out from the “naked spot”
  15. 15. Solar active regions and their interaction with the surrounding granulation CaIIH reveals filamentary structure all around the spot. Naked spot ?? LCT measures inward radial horizontal velocity components all around the spot.
  16. 16. Magnetic extrapolations Full-atmosphere inversions: LILIA To obtain physical quantities (mag. field strength/inclination v LOS, microturbulence, temperature, .....) To relate evolution of photospheric magnetic structures with phenomena in upper layers (i.e. reconnection) Local Correlation Tracking Applied to EIS data.

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