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PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
PP for syncrinization
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PP for syncrinization

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  1. Ensuring Student Success<br />Research Topic: Digital Portfolios<br />Complex Reasoning Process: Systems Analysis<br />Presentation By:<br />Andrew Steggall-Lewis<br />
  2. Overview<br /><ul><li> Today we are going to present our research about Digital Portfolios through the lens of Systems Analysis.
  3. Specifically, we will present research findings to identify how Digital Portfolios support assessment and learning
  4. In other words, how are Digital Portfolios able to Ensure Student Success?</li></li></ul><li>What is a Digital Portfolio?<br /><ul><li>Hartnell-Young & Morris (1999, p.105) assert that a “digital portfolio is a multifaceted tool which can be used to fill several different purposes, but the most important is that it promotes learning among both students and teachers. This type of portfolio will be an important asset to schools and individuals as society heads into the Digital Age”</li></li></ul><li>Our system for analysis: Utilizing Digital Portfolios for supporting Assessment and Reporting<br />
  5. 2. What are things that are related to the system but are not a part of it?<br />Home Environment<br />Attitudes & Perceptions<br />HoM<br />School Culture<br />Assessment Philosophy<br />Classroom Environment <br />
  6. 3. How do the parts affect each other?<br />
  7. Example of Embedded Criteria Sheet<br />
  8. Example of Embedded Criteria Sheet<br />Conceptual links between theory, pedagogical strategies, content and assessment<br />
  9. Example of Embedded Criteria Sheet<br />Conceptual links between theory, pedagogical strategies, content and assessment<br />
  10. Hyperlink to provide elaborations<br /><ul><li>Theories needed to include are…</li></ul> ………………………………………………………………………….<br /> ………………………………………………………………………….<br /><ul><li>Pedagogical strategies needed to include are…</li></ul> ………………………………………………………………………….<br /> ………………………………………………………………………….<br /><ul><li>Example paragraph to illustrate how to link….</li></ul> ………………………………………………………………………….<br /> ………………………………………………………………………….<br /> ………………………………………………………………………….<br /> ………………………………………………………………………….<br />Conceptual links between<br /> theory, pedagogical strategies, <br />content and assessment<br />
  11. 3. How do the parts affect each other?<br />
  12. Learning Manager - School<br /><ul><li> Critical for Digital Portfolios to be secured with password protection, due to the confidential nature of the assessment process, so that only appropriate audiences have access.
  13. When utilizing ICTs, Learning Managers are responsible for adhering to school policies regarding internet safety</li></ul>(Barrett, 2000)<br />
  14. 3. How do the parts affect each other?<br />
  15. Student - School<br /><ul><li>Students are able to address the required Essential Learnings
  16. When utilizing ICTs, students are responsible for adhering to school policies regarding internet safety
  17. School policies regarding Inclusive practices ensures that all students have sufficient access to ICTs
  18. School provides resources necessary for creating Digital Portfolios
  19. Relevant stakeholders (parents and care givers) are able to readily view students learning – they can identify improvements in students work over time and be aware of learning needs in the future</li></ul>(Queensland Studies Authority, 2008) <br />
  20. 4. What would happen if various parts stopped or changed their behaviour?<br />Future Possibilities?<br />
  21. 4. What would happen if various parts stopped or changed their behaviour?<br />Future Possibilities?<br />
  22. 4. What would happen if various parts stopped or changed their behaviour?<br />Future Possibilities?<br />
  23. Conclusion<br /><ul><li> Digital Portfolios enable students to celebrate their success throughout their learning journey
  24. Digital Portfolios successfully engage students, therefore Learning Managers have a truer understanding of their declarative and procedural knowledge, allowing for authentic assessment and reporting to ensure student success</li></ul>(Hartnell-Young and Morris, 1999)<br />
  25. References<br />Barrett, H. (1997). Collaborative planning for electronic portfolios: Asking strategic questions. In the proceedings of the National Educational Computing Conference, Seattle, Washington. Retrieved July 26, 2009 from http://www.aare.edu.au/02pap/woo02363.htm<br />Barrett, H. (2000). Create your own electronic portfolio: Using off-the-shelf software to showcase your own or student work. In Learning and Leading with Technology. Retrieved July 24, 2009 from http://electronicportfolios.com/portfolios/iste2k.html<br />Black, P. & William, D. (1998). Inside the black box: Raising standards through classroom assessment. London, UK: King’s College London School of Education<br />Brady, L. & Kennedy, K. (2005). Celebrating Student Achievement: Assessment and Reporting.Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Prentice Hall<br />Hartnell-Young, E. and Morris, M. (1999). Digital professional portfolios for change. Hawker Brownlow Education: Australia<br />Marzano, R. & Pickering, D. (1997). Dimensions of Learning: Teachers manual, 2nd Edition. Colarado, USA: Mc REL. <br />Prensky, M. (2005). “Engage me or enrage me”: What today’s learners demand. In Educause Review. Retrieved July 17, 2009 from http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/erm0553.pdf<br />Queensland Studies Authority. (2007). The QCAR Framework — aligning curriculum, assessment and reporting. Queensland: Queensland Studies Authority<br />Queensland Studies Authority. (2008) Guidelines for reporting: Guidelines for school sectors — reporting student achievement in Queensland schools. Queensland: Queensland Studies Authority<br />Smith, R.,Lynch, D., & Knight, B. (2007).Learning Management: Transitioning teachers for national and international change. Frenchs Forest, NSW, Australia: Pearson Education Australia<br />

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