Australian Curriculum History - how to deal with the overviews

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Australian Curriculum History - how to deal with the overviews

  1. 1. Australian Curriculum: History The overviews: 7 - 10 Annabel Astbury | HTAV
  2. 2. For a summary of the Australian Curriculum: History www.slideshare.net/astbury
  3. 3. Australian Curriculum: Years 7 – 10 Content Structure | Annabel Astbury 2011 Approach & Rationale <ul><li>Takes a world history approach </li></ul><ul><li>within this world history, the history of Australia is taught </li></ul><ul><li>Framework: Inquiry questions / Historical Knowledge and Understandings & Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Implementation in Victoria 2013 </li></ul>Certainties
  4. 4. Preparing for change Content Structure | Annabel Astbury 2011 What’s similar? <ul><li>Many familiar topics at the year levels </li></ul><ul><li>Strands: Historical Knowledge & Understanding and Historical Skills </li></ul><ul><li>A discrete course at each year level (7 - 10) </li></ul><ul><li>The historical skills cross two year bands </li></ul><ul><li>Guiding questions of inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>“ Overviews” / “Depth Studies” </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporation of cross curriculum priorities </li></ul>© Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikimedia Commons What’s different?
  5. 5. Action to take now in your faculty Content Structure | Annabel Astbury 2011 Audit Topics <ul><li>Use the document to audit your current courses to assess which areas will need most professional support </li></ul><ul><li>Consider timing: feedback needs to be given </li></ul><ul><li>VCAA has not made any comment about indicative hours </li></ul><ul><li>The 4 AC subjects will be implemented into the VELS and be called (AusVELS) </li></ul>2013: what does the timetable look like?
  6. 6. Overviews and Depth Studies Content Structure | Annabel Astbury 2011 The place and position of overviews <ul><li>To provide students with the opportunity to develop and apply the concepts and skills of historical inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>Content in each elective is designed to allow detailed study of specific aspects of the historical period </li></ul>©User: Hanay / Wikimedia Commons <ul><li>An overview will constitute approximately 10% of the total teaching time for the year </li></ul><ul><li>Overview content identifies important features of the period as part of an expansive chronology </li></ul><ul><li>The overview could be built into different parts of the depth studies as appropriate </li></ul>The place and position of Depth Studies
  7. 7. Key Inquiry Questions / Answers Overviews Depth Studies Historical Knowledge and Understanding Historical Skills
  8. 8. Planning a course <ul><li>Look at content of the overview and assess where it fits into the depth studies </li></ul><ul><li>Use the key inquiry questions as a focus for the teaching and learning </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on integrating the overviews </li></ul><ul><li>Over the year the course has to tell a bigger story </li></ul><ul><li>Some aspects of overviews can be useful introducing depth study </li></ul>
  9. 9. Year 7 The Ancient World (60 000 BCE – c. 650 CE) <ul><li>How do we know about the ancient past? </li></ul><ul><li>Why and where did the earliest societies develop? </li></ul><ul><li>What emerged as the defining characteristics of ancient societies? </li></ul><ul><li>What have been the legacies of ancient societies? </li></ul>Key Inquiry Questions | Annabel Astbury 2011 Key Inquiry Questions
  10. 10. Structure of year Year 7 Annabel Astbury 2011 Depth study 2: The Mediterranean World Overview Depth study 1: Investigating the Ancient Past Depth study 3: The Asian World
  11. 11. Planning <ul><li>This approach gets you to refocus on the broader questions of inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>Does not allow for the approach of the overview being taught as a discreet topic </li></ul>Depth Study Which Inquiry Questions can be answered in this Depth Study? Which parts of the overview can be addressed in this Depth Study?
  12. 12. Overview content for the ancient world (Egypt, Mesopotamia, Persia, Greece, Rome, India, China and the Maya) includes the following: the theory that people moved out of Africa around 60 000 BCE and migrated to other parts of the world, including Australia • using a map to describe the pattern of movement of humans ‘out of Africa’ and across other continents over time, and looking at the types of evidence of these movements (for example stone tools, human remains and cave paintings) the evidence for the emergence and establishment of ancient societies (including art, iconography, writing tools and pottery) • exploring an early example of art (for example the 17 000 BCE great bull paintings from the Lascaux Cave in France) and discussing why they may have been painted • discussing the evolving nature of the evidence in this period, which shows increasingly sophisticated forms of technology (for example the transition from making tools out of stone, bone and wood to metalworking) • identifying sources of evidence for the emergence of organised states (for example the Cuneiform script phonetic writing of the Sumerians c.3500 BCE; the ancient law code of Hammurabi clay tablets from ancient Babylon c.1790 BCE; artefacts found in the tombs at Ur Sumer c.2500 BCE, which indicate the presence of either royalty or priestesses; pottery shards and fragments discovered in Palestine made of mud from the River Nile in Egypt as evidence of trade key features of ancient societies (farming, trade, social classes, religion, rule of law) • exploring why the shift from hunting and foraging to cultivation (and the domestication of animals) led to the development of permanent settlements • identifying the major civilisations of the ancient world (namely Egypt, Mesopotamia, Persia, Greece, Rome, India, China and the Maya); where and when they existed, and the evidence for contact between them • locating the major civilisations of the ancient world on a world map and using a timeline to identify the longevity of each ancient civilisation • identifying the major religions/philosophies that emerged by the end of the period (Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, Islam), and their key beliefs (through group work) Overview elaborations - suggested approaches for teaching
  13. 13. <ul><li>the theory that people moved out of Africa around 60 000 BCE and migrated to other parts of the world, including Australia </li></ul><ul><li>the evidence for the emergence and establishment of ancient societies (including art, iconography, writing tools and pottery) </li></ul><ul><li>key features of ancient societies (farming, trade, social classes, religion, rule of law) </li></ul><ul><li>How historians and archaeologists investigate history, including excavation and archival research </li></ul><ul><li>The range of sources that can be used in an historical investigation, including archaeological and written sources  </li></ul><ul><li>The methods and sources used to investigate at least ONE historical controversy or mystery that has challenged historians or archaeologists, such as in the analysis of unidentified human remains  </li></ul><ul><li>The nature of the sources for  ancient  Australia and what they reveal about Australia’s past in the  ancient  period , such as the use of resources  </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of conserving the remains of the past, using examples from the  ancient  world  </li></ul>Overview Depth Study Content: Investigating the Ancient Past
  14. 14. <ul><li>the theory that people moved out of Africa around 60 000 BCE and migrated to other parts of the world, including Australia </li></ul><ul><li>the evidence for the emergence and establishment of ancient societies (including art, iconography, writing tools and pottery) </li></ul><ul><li>key features of ancient societies (farming, trade, social classes, religion, rule of law) </li></ul><ul><li>How historians and archaeologists investigate history, including excavation and archival research </li></ul><ul><li>The range of sources that can be used in an historical investigation, including archaeological and written sources  </li></ul><ul><li>The methods and sources used to investigate at least ONE historical controversy or mystery that has challenged historians or archaeologists, such as in the analysis of unidentified human remains  </li></ul><ul><li>The nature of the sources for  ancient  Australia and what they reveal about Australia’s past in the  ancient  period , such as the use of resources  </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of conserving the remains of the past, using examples from the  ancient  world  </li></ul>Overview Depth Study Content: Investigating the Ancient Past It is my opinion that these elements will be covered in every depth study at Year 7 (and beyond?)
  15. 15. Depth Study Content: Investigating the Ancient Past <ul><li>The nature of the sources for  ancient  Australia and what they reveal about Australia’s past in the  ancient  period , such as the use of resources  </li></ul><ul><li>How historians and archaeologists investigate history, including excavation and archival research </li></ul><ul><li>The range of sources that can be used in an historical investigation, including archaeological and written sources  </li></ul><ul><li>The methods and sources used to investigate at least ONE historical controversy or mystery that has challenged historians or archaeologists, such as in the analysis of unidentified human remains  </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of conserving the remains of the past, using examples from the  ancient  world  </li></ul><ul><li>the theory that people moved out of Africa around 60 000 BCE and migrated to other parts of the world, including Australia </li></ul><ul><li>[ How this theory settles with discovery of Mungo Man and woman </li></ul><ul><li>Range of sources and methods used to investigate the past] </li></ul><ul><li>the evidence for the emergence and establishment of ancient societies (including art, iconography, writing tools and pottery) </li></ul><ul><li>key features of ancient societies (farming, trade, social classes, religion, rule of law) </li></ul>Overview Key Inquiry Questions: How do we know about the Ancient Past? Where and Why did the earliest societies develop? What emerged as the defining characteristics of ancient societies? Sample
  16. 16. Annabel Astbury 2011 Depth study 2: The Mediterranean World Choose one: <ul><li>The physical features of the area under study </li></ul><ul><li>Roles of key groups in the ancient society </li></ul><ul><li>The significant beliefs, values and practices of the ancient culture </li></ul><ul><li>Contacts and conflicts within and/or other societies, resulting in developments such as expansion of trade </li></ul><ul><li>The role of a significant individual in the ancient society </li></ul>Overview Historical Knowledge and Understanding Year 7: The Ancient World OR OR Egypt Greece Rome
  17. 17. <ul><li>the evidence for the emergence and establishment of ancient societies (including art, iconography, writing tools and pottery) </li></ul><ul><li>Why and where did the earliest societies develop? </li></ul><ul><li>key features of ancient societies (farming, trade, social classes, religion, rule of law) </li></ul>Could begin with story of Gilgamesh Introduction to way of life / ancient culture / cuniform / Ice age - climate change Depth Study Which Inquiry Questions can be answered in this Depth Study? Which parts of the overview can be addressed in this Depth Study?
  18. 18. Annabel Astbury 2011 Overview Depth study 3: The Asian World Choose one: <ul><li>The physical features of the area under study </li></ul><ul><li>Roles of key groups in the ancient society </li></ul><ul><li>The significant beliefs, values and practices of the ancient culture </li></ul><ul><li>Contacts and conflicts within and/or other societies, resulting in developments such as expansion of trade </li></ul><ul><li>The role of a significant individual in the ancient society </li></ul>Historical Knowledge and Understanding Year 7: The Ancient World OR China India
  19. 19. <ul><li>the theory that people moved out of Africa around 60 000 BCE and migrated to other parts of the world, including Australia </li></ul><ul><li>the evidence for the emergence and establishment of ancient societies (including art, iconography, writing tools and pottery) </li></ul><ul><li>key features of ancient societies (farming, trade, social classes, religion, rule of law) </li></ul><ul><li>The physical features of the area under study </li></ul><ul><li>Roles of key groups in the ancient society </li></ul><ul><li>The significant beliefs, values and practices of the ancient culture </li></ul><ul><li>Contacts and conflicts within and/or other societies, resulting in developments such as expansion of trade </li></ul><ul><li>The role of a significant individual in the ancient society </li></ul>Overview Depth Study Content: The Mediterranean World <ul><li>One can see here that certain parts of the overview are going to be more relevant depending upon the depth study. </li></ul>Key Inquiry Questions: How do we know about the ancient past? What emerged as the defining characteristics of ancient societies? What have been the legacies of Ancient Societies?
  20. 20. Activities that may assist in student learning of overviews Danger that the teaching of the overviews could be completely teacher centred / comprehension type questions - no critical analysis or thought. <ul><li>Activities that allow students to work individually / small groups which generate questions and thought: </li></ul><ul><li>Mapping exercise: annotated maps on Google maps - great to give overviews and maintain throughout the course </li></ul><ul><li>small group work on analysis of objects: ‘mystery’ objects from collections such as History of the world in 100 Objects </li></ul><ul><li>Small group work on analysis of images </li></ul><ul><li>Timelines: using online tools that can be amended or added to. </li></ul>
  21. 21. BBC: The Incredible Human Journey: Episode 4 Australia Essential Resources for Year 7: Overview BBC: The Incredible Human Journey BBC: The Incredible Human Journey: Episode 1 Out of Africa The Journey of Mankind Interactive Map (Bradshaw Foundation) The Bradshaw Foundation Rock Art Galleries World History for us all (University of San Diego Study Guide) colonies and emporia (Map) The work of an archaeologist BBC Interactive
  22. 22. Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History History of the world in 100 objects 1001 Inventions of the Muslim World Essential Resources for Year 7: Overview David Rumsey Cartography Collection
  23. 23. Year 8 The Ancient to the Modern World <ul><li>How did societies change from the end of the ancient period to the beginning of the modern age? </li></ul><ul><li>What key beliefs and values emerged and how did they influence societies? </li></ul><ul><li>What were the causes and effects of contact between societies in this period? </li></ul><ul><li>What significant people, groups and ideas from this period have influenced the world today? </li></ul>Key Inquiry Questions | Annabel Astbury 2011 Key Inquiry Questions
  24. 24. Annabel Astbury 2011 Structure of year Year 8 Depth study 2: The Asia-Pacific World Overview Depth study 1: The Western and Islamic World Depth study 3: Expanding Contacts
  25. 25. Annabel Astbury 2011 Overview <ul><li>Overview content is meant to take no more than 10% of teaching time </li></ul><ul><li>The overview could be built into different parts of the depth studies as appropriate </li></ul><ul><li>Overview content for the ancient to modern world (Byzantine, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Viking, Ottoman, Khmer, Mongols, Yuan and Ming dynasties, Aztec, Inca) includes the following: </li></ul><ul><li>the transformation of the Roman world and the spread of Christianity and Islam </li></ul><ul><li>key features of the medieval world (feudalism, trade routes, voyages of discovery, contact and conflict) </li></ul><ul><li>the emergence of ideas about the world and the place of people in it by the end of the period (such as the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment). </li></ul>Overview Year 8
  26. 26. Overview elaborations - suggested approaches (Year 8) <ul><li>Overview content for the ancient to modern world (Byzantine, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Viking, Ottoman, Khmer, Mongols, Yuan and Ming dynasties, Aztec, Inca) includes the following: </li></ul><ul><li>the transformation of the Roman world and the spread of Christianity and Islam </li></ul><ul><li>• recognising how relations between the Islamic and Western worlds were characterised by both peaceful coexistence (trade) and conflict during this period (the Crusades) </li></ul><ul><li>• discussing Britain after the end of the Roman occupation; the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms; Old English and the foundations of modern English; Beowulf and archaeology; Anglo-Saxon institutions and the roots of medieval parliament </li></ul><ul><li>key features of the medieval world (feudalism, trade routes, voyages of discovery, contact and conflict) </li></ul><ul><li>• identifying the major civilisations of the period (Byzantine, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Viking, Ottoman, Khmer, Mongols, Yuan and Ming dynasties, Aztec, Inca); where and when they existed; and their extent (for example the Vikings through Europe, the Mongols across Eurasia, and Spain in the Americas) </li></ul><ul><li>• locating the major trading routes (including the Mediterranean; the Silk Road; the sea route between China, India and the east coast of Africa; and the Columbian Exchange) on a map and identifying the nature of the trade/contact (for example along the Silk Road – slaves, spices, silk, glassware, spread of knowledge and diseases) </li></ul><ul><li>• describing beliefs about the world and the voyages of discovery (European and Asian), the nature of the voyages and the redrawing of the map of the world </li></ul><ul><li>• explaining the significance of land ownership in the practice of feudalism and the nature of feudalism in Europe (for example knights) and Japan (for example samurai) </li></ul><ul><li>the emergence of ideas about the world and the place of people in it by the end of the period (such as the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment). </li></ul><ul><li>discussing the extent of knowledge about the world as indicated through changing world maps (for example the Da Ming Hun Yi Tu world map (1389 CE); and the Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis by Hendrik Hondius (1630) </li></ul>
  27. 27. Annabel Astbury 2011 Depth study 1: The Western and Islamic World Choose one: Overview Historical Knowledge and Understanding Year 8: The Ancient to the Modern World OR Medieval Europe (c.590 - c.1500) <ul><li>The way of life in Medieval Europe </li></ul><ul><li>Significant developments and/or cultural achievements </li></ul><ul><li>Continuity and change in society in ONE of the following areas: crime and punishment, military and defence systems; towns cities and commerce </li></ul><ul><li>The dominance of the catholic Church and the role of significant individuals </li></ul>Renaissance Italy (c.1400-c.1600) <ul><li>The way of life in Renaissance Italy </li></ul><ul><li>Significant developments and/or cultural achievements that reflect the concentration of wealth and power in the city states </li></ul><ul><li>Relationships between rulers and ruled in ONE Italian city-state </li></ul><ul><li>The roles and achievements of significant individuals </li></ul>Vikings (c.790 - c. 1066) <ul><li>The way of life in Viking society </li></ul><ul><li>Significant developments and/or cultural achievements that led to Viking expansion </li></ul><ul><li>Viking conquests and relationships with subject peoples </li></ul><ul><li>The role of a significant individual in the expansion of Viking settlement </li></ul>OR <ul><li>The way of life in the Ottoman Empire </li></ul><ul><li>Significant developments and/or cultural achievements that reflect the influence of the Ottoman Empire </li></ul><ul><li>Relationships with subject peoples </li></ul><ul><li>The role of significant individuals </li></ul>Ottoman Empire (c.1299-c.1683) OR
  28. 28. Annabel Astbury 2011 Depth study 2: The Asia-Pacific World Choose one: Historical Knowledge and Understanding Year 8: The Ancient to the Modern World <ul><li>Theories about the origin and spread of Polynesian settlers throughout the Pacific </li></ul><ul><li>The way of life of ONE Polynesian society </li></ul><ul><li>The cultural achievements of ONE Polynesian society </li></ul><ul><li>The ways Polynesian societies used environmental resources </li></ul>The Polynesian Expansion across the Pacific (c.700-c.1756) Angkor/Khmer Empire (c.802-c.1327) <ul><li>The way of life in the Khmer Empire </li></ul><ul><li>The reason for Angkor’s rise to prominence </li></ul><ul><li>The cultural achievements of the Khmer civilisation </li></ul><ul><li>Theories behind the decline of Angkor </li></ul>OR Shogunate Japan (c.794-c.1867) <ul><li>The way of life in Shogunate Japan </li></ul><ul><li>The role of the Tokugawa Shogunate in establishing a feudal system & in increasing foreign trade </li></ul><ul><li>The use of environmental resources and policies by the shogunate </li></ul><ul><li>The significance of modernisation & westernisation in the decline of the shogunate </li></ul>OR Overview
  29. 29. Annabel Astbury 2011 Overview Depth study 3: Expanding Contacts Choose one: Historical Knowledge and Understanding Year 8: The Ancient to the Modern World <ul><li>Pre-Colombian life in the Americas, including social organisation, city life and beliefs </li></ul><ul><li>Movements of the Spanish peoples to the Americas & encounters with various societies and geographical features </li></ul><ul><li>The nature of interaction between indigenous populations and the Spanish </li></ul><ul><li>The impact of the conquest on the Aztecs OR Incas as well as the wider world </li></ul><ul><li>The longer term effects of colonisation </li></ul>The Spanish Conquest of the Americas (c.1492-c.1572) OR The Black Death in Asia, Europe & Africa (C14th Plague) <ul><li>Living conditions and religious beliefs in C14th </li></ul><ul><li>The role of expanding trade between Europe and Asia & the origin and spread of disease </li></ul><ul><li>The causes & symptoms of and responses to the Black Death </li></ul><ul><li>The effects of the Black Death on the populations & conflicting theories about the impact of the plague </li></ul><ul><li>Other immediate and long-term effects of the plague </li></ul>OR <ul><li>The nomadic lifestyle of the Mongols & the rise of Temujin </li></ul><ul><li>The organisation of the Mongol army under Ghengis Khan and the treatment of conquered peoples </li></ul><ul><li>The extent of the Mongol expansion </li></ul><ul><li>The consequences of the Mongol expansion </li></ul>Mongol Expansion (c.1206-c.1368)
  30. 30. Essential Resources for Year 8: Overview David Rumsey Cartography Collection BBC: The Beauty of Maps Anglo Saxon Activities 1001 Inventions of the Muslim World
  31. 31. Year 9 The Making of the Modern World <ul><li>What were the changing features of the movements of people from 1750-1918? </li></ul><ul><li>How did new ideas and technological developments contribute to change in this period? </li></ul><ul><li>What was the origin, development, significance and long-term impact of imperialism in this period? </li></ul><ul><li>What was the significance of World War I? </li></ul>Key Inquiry Questions | Annabel Astbury 2011 Key Inquiry Questions
  32. 32. Annabel Astbury 2011 Structure of year Year 9 Depth study 2: Australia and Asia Overview Depth study 1: Making a Better World? Depth study 3: World War I
  33. 33. Annabel Astbury 2011 Overview <ul><li>Overview content is meant to take no more than 10% of teaching time </li></ul><ul><li>The overview could be built into different parts of the depth studies as appropriate </li></ul><ul><li>Overview content for the making of the modern world includes the following: </li></ul><ul><li>the nature and significance of the Industrial Revolution and how it affected living and working conditions, including within Australia </li></ul><ul><li>the nature and extent of the movement of peoples in the period (slaves, convicts and settlers) </li></ul><ul><li>the extent of European imperial expansion and different responses, including in the Asian region </li></ul><ul><li>the emergence and nature of significant economic, social and political ideas in the period, including nationalism </li></ul>Overview Year 9
  34. 34. Overview elaborations - suggested approaches (Year 9) Overview content for the making of the modern world includes the following: the nature and significance of the Industrial Revolution and how it affected living and working conditions, including within Australia • comparing the usefulness of artworks depicting life in the period with the first photographs • investigating the changing nature of the sources that provide a record of life in this period, such as paintings, travellers’ journals and the development of photography and film by 1918 the nature and extent of the movement of peoples in the period (slaves, convicts and settlers) • identifying the number of slaves transported and the nations/places involved (for example Portugal, Britain, France, Spain, North America) the extent of European imperial expansion and different responses, including in the Asian region • outlining the technologies of mass production that contributed to the Industrial Revolution and the changes in Australian life that occurred as a result of these technologies • recognising how Asian societies responded to European imperialism, the extent to which they were changed and the influence they exercised on the rest of the world • identifying Asian societies that were colonised by Europeans and those that remained independent the emergence and nature of significant economic, social and political ideas in the period, including nationalism • outlining the features that reflect the emergence of a belief in social and political equality, including the right to vote, egalitarianism and universal education in Australia • recognising how events such as the French Revolution and American independence contributed to ideas of equality • the role of Classical models and theories on the invention of democratic values
  35. 35. Annabel Astbury 2011 Depth study 1: Making a Better World? Choose one: Overview Historical Knowledge and Understanding Year 9: The Making of the Modern World <ul><li>The emergence and nature of key ideas in the period with a focus on ONE of: capitalism, socialism, egalitarianism, nationalism, imperialism, Darwinism, Chartism </li></ul><ul><li>the reasons why ONE key idea emerged and/or developed a following </li></ul><ul><li>The role of an individual or group in the promotion of one of these ideas and the responses to it. </li></ul><ul><li>Short and long-term impacts of ONE of these ideas on Australia and the world </li></ul>Progressive Ideas and Movements (1750-1918) OR The Industrial Revolution (1750 - 1914) <ul><li>The technological innovations that led to the Industrial Revolution, and other factors that influenced the industrialisation of Britain </li></ul><ul><li>The population movements and changing settlement patterns during the period </li></ul><ul><li>The changing way of life for people and their experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Short and long-term impacts of the Industrial Revolution </li></ul>OR Movement of Peoples (c.1750-1901) <ul><li>The influence of the Industrial Revolution on the movements of peoples throughout the world </li></ul><ul><li>The experiences of slaves, convicts and settlers upon their departure, journey abroad & their reactions upon arrival </li></ul><ul><li>Changes in the way of life of a group(s) of people who moved to Australia during this period </li></ul><ul><li>Short and long-term impacts of the movement of peoples during this period </li></ul>
  36. 36. Annabel Astbury 2011 Depth study 2: Asia and Australia 1750 - 1918 Choose one: Overview Historical Knowledge and Understanding Year 9: The Making of the Modern World OR Making a Nation 1750 - 1918 <ul><li>The extension of settlement, including the effects of contact between European settlers and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples </li></ul><ul><li>The experiences of non-Europeans in Australia prior to the 1900s </li></ul><ul><li>The living and working conditions in Australia around the turn of the twentieth century </li></ul><ul><li>Key events and ideas in the development of Australian self-government and democracy </li></ul><ul><li>Legislation 1901 - 1914 </li></ul>Asia and the world 1750 -1918 <ul><li>The key features of ONE Asian society at the start of the period </li></ul><ul><li>Change and continuity in the Asian society during this period, including any effects of contact with European powers </li></ul><ul><li>the position of the Asian society in relation to other nations in he world around the turn of the twentieth century </li></ul><ul><li>The significance of ONE key event that involved the Asian society and European Powers, including different perspectives of the event at the time. </li></ul>
  37. 37. Annabel Astbury 2011 Overview Depth study 3: World War I <ul><li>An overview of the causes of World War I and the reasons why men enlisted to fight in the war </li></ul><ul><li>The places where Australians fought and the nature of warfare during World War I, including the Gallipoli campaign </li></ul><ul><li>The impact of World War I, with a particular emphasis on Australia </li></ul><ul><li>The commemoration of World War I, including debates about the nature and significance of the Anzac legend </li></ul>Historical Knowledge and Understanding Year 9: The Making of the Modern World
  38. 38. Essential Resources for Year 9: Overview Slave Voyages Internet Modern History Sourcebook: Industrial Revolution Images of the industrial revolution Create a timeline of ideas: equality & democratic values
  39. 39. Year 10 The Modern World and Australia <ul><li>How did the nature of global conflict change during the twentieth century? </li></ul><ul><li>What were the consequences of World War II? How did these consequences shape the modern world? </li></ul><ul><li>How was Australian society affected by other significant global events and changes in this period? </li></ul>Key Inquiry Questions | Annabel Astbury 2011 Key Inquiry Questions
  40. 40. Annabel Astbury 2011 Structure of year Year 10 Depth study 2: Rights and freedoms Overview Depth study 1: World War II Depth study 3: The globalising world
  41. 41. Annabel Astbury 2011 Overview <ul><li>Overview content for the Modern World and Australia includes the following: </li></ul><ul><li>the inter-war years between World War I and World War II, including the Treaty of Versailles, the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression </li></ul><ul><li>continuing efforts post-World War II to achieve lasting peace and security in the world, including Australia’s involvement in UN peacekeeping </li></ul><ul><li>the major movements for rights and freedom in the world and the achievement of independence by former colonies </li></ul><ul><li>the nature of the Cold War and Australia’s involvement in Cold War and post-Cold War conflicts (Korea, Vietnam, The Gulf Wars, Afghanistan), including the rising influence of Asian nations since the end of the Cold War </li></ul><ul><li>developments in technology, public health, longevity and standard of living during the twentieth century, and concern for the environment and sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>Overview content is meant to take no more than 10% of teaching time </li></ul><ul><li>The overview could be built into different parts of the depth studies as appropriate </li></ul>Personal comment: The amount of content in the Year 10 overview seems much more than other year levels. (Inter war years & Cold War elements) This will effect choice of topics. Very careful planning required if all of these elements to be included. Overview Year 10
  42. 42. Overview elaborations - suggested approaches (Year 10) Overview content for the Modern World and Australia includes the following: the inter-war years between World War I and World War II, including the Treaty of Versailles, the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression • recognising the main features of the Treaty of Versailles, for example territorial concessions required by Germany and the imposition of war reparations • outlining key features of the interwar years (for example mass production in the 1920s, such as the manufacture of vehicles in the US; the ‘flapper generation’ and the Jazz Age; the Crash of 1929; and the consequences of the Great Depression continuing efforts post-World War II to achieve lasting peace and security in the world, including Australia’s involvement in UN peacekeeping • creating a chronological account of conflicts in which Australia has been involved and the resources (for example soldiers, equipment, intelligence) that Australia committed to each conflict • outlining the purpose of the United Nations and the key places where Australia has been involved in UN peacekeeping the major movements for rights and freedom in the world and the achievement of independence by former colonies • identifying the major movements for rights and freedom in the world (including the US Civil Rights movement, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander movements, women’s movements) • recognising the continuing nature of civil rights movements in the twentieth century, such as the struggle for democracy in Burma
  43. 43. the nature of the Cold War and Australia’s involvement in Cold War and post-Cold War conflicts (Korea, Vietnam, The Gulf Wars, Afghanistan), including the rising influence of Asian nations since the end of the Cold War • identifying the Cold War superpowers as well as the significance of the Cuban Missile Crisis and the fall of the Berlin Wall • outlining the competing ideologies of capitalism and communism, the US as the world’s last remaining superpower, and the rising influence of China and India (economic and political) developments in technology, public health, longevity and standard of living during the twentieth century, and concern for the environment and sustainability • brainstorming forms of technology that have affected what people see and hear, where they go, and how they live • tracing key developments in technology since 1918 that have changed the world in the following areas: the household (radio, television, appliances), travel and trade (shipping, passenger jets), communications (invention of the microchip, satellites, digital technologies) • recognising the growth in the world’s population during the twentieth century, life expectancy changes in different parts of the world, and the depletion of natural resources Overview elaborations - suggested approaches (Year 10)
  44. 44. Annabel Astbury 2011 Depth study 1: World War II <ul><li>An overview of the causes and course of World War II </li></ul><ul><li>An examination of significant events of World War II </li></ul><ul><li>The experiences of Australians during World War II </li></ul><ul><li>The impact of World War II, with a particular emphasis on the Australian home front </li></ul><ul><li>The significance of World War II to Australia’s international relationships in the twentieth century, with particular reference to the UN, Britain, the USA and Asia </li></ul>Overview Historical Knowledge and Understanding Year 10: The Modern World and Australia
  45. 45. Annabel Astbury 2011 Depth study 2: Rights and freedoms (1945 - present) <ul><li>The origins and significance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, including Australia’s involvement in the development of this decision </li></ul><ul><li>Background to the struggle of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples for rights and freedoms before 1965 </li></ul><ul><li>The US Civil Rights movement and its influence on Australia </li></ul><ul><li>The significance of the following for the civil rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander peoples: 1962 right to vote, 1967 Referendum, Reconciliation, Mabo decision, Bringing Them Home, the Apology </li></ul><ul><li>Methods used by civil rights activists to achieve change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the role of ONE individual or group in the struggle </li></ul><ul><li>The continuing nature of efforts to secure civil rights and freedoms in Australia and throughout the world. </li></ul>Overview Historical Knowledge and Understanding Year 10: The Modern World and Australia
  46. 46. OR Annabel Astbury 2011 Depth study 3: The globalising world Choose one: Overview Historical Knowledge and Understanding Year 10: The modern world and Australia <ul><li>The waves of post-World War II migration to Australia, including the significance of world events </li></ul><ul><li>The impact of changing government policies on Australia’s migration patterns </li></ul><ul><li>The impact of at least ONE world event or development & its significance for Australia </li></ul><ul><li>The contribution of migration to Australia’s changing identity as a nation and to its international relationships </li></ul>Migration experiences (1945-present) OR Popular Culture (1954-present) <ul><li>the nature of popular culture in Australia at the end of World War II </li></ul><ul><li>Developments in popular culture in post-war Australia and their impact on society </li></ul><ul><li>The changing nature of the music, film and television industry in Australia during the post-war period </li></ul><ul><li>Australia’s contribution to international popular culture and changing beliefs and values that have influenced the Australian way of life </li></ul>The environment movement (1960s - present) <ul><li>The background to environmental awareness </li></ul><ul><li>The intensification of environmental effects in the twentieth century as a result of population increase </li></ul><ul><li>The growth and influence of the environment movement in Australia and overseas </li></ul><ul><li>Significant events and campaigns that contributed to popular awareness of environmental issues </li></ul><ul><li>Responses of Australian governments and international organisations to environmental threats since the 1960s </li></ul>
  47. 47. Essential Resources for Year 10: Overview Jazz Age Culture (Uni of Pittsburgh) Picturing the century (National Archives USA) Australian Screen Online National Archives of Australia Learning Resources
  48. 48. Teacher Reading
  49. 49. Teacher Reading
  50. 50. Teacher Reading
  51. 51. For teaching activities
  52. 52. For teaching activities
  53. 53. For teaching activities
  54. 54. Curriculum and Assessment Authorities ACARA | www.acara.edu.au VCAA | www.vcaa.vic.edu.au
  55. 55. Contact I’d love to hear about your ideas... Annabel Astbury [email_address] Twitter: @ annabel_a Diigo (My Bookmarks ): www.diigo.com/astbury Slidesh are (My presentations ): www.slideshare.net/astbury

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