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The Creation Of A Fixed Gear
 

The Creation Of A Fixed Gear

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    The Creation Of A Fixed Gear The Creation Of A Fixed Gear Presentation Transcript

    • The Creation of a Fixed Gear Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] 8 th – 10 th Grade English Designed by Andrew Starkey [email_address] Photo: Tunaboat of Flickr – 03/31/08 2
    • Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Your old bicycle has just gotten too beaten up over the years, and it's now time to get something new. You've been hearing some things about fixed gear bicycles. They seem like they'd offer something different – they feel completely different to ride, in fact. You want a new bike, but don't quite have the money for one. You know your English teacher is way into fixed gear biking (and biking in general), maybe if you did some research and wrote up a proposal for him he might be willing to help make it happen. 2
    • The Tasks Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] There will be two products in this proposal: First, you know your teacher isn't going to help if you just beg without having any knowledge beforehand. One piece of the proposal will prove that you know about bikes and that you'll be able to take care of your fixed gear bike keep it in a safe working condition. This will be a technical writing piece that will demonstrate knowledge of all aspects of an ordinary fixed gear bicycle and especially those parts that make them separate from the more common freewheel type bicycles. The second piece will be an actual plan and proposal for the building of a bicycle. This portion will include some persuasive elements to try to win over your teacher's willingness to help with the acquiring, building, and possibly even funding, of your project. This part will also include actual searching for finding the necessary pieces of the bicycle that you plan to create. Title Photo: Biché of Flickr – 03/31/08 2
    • The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
      • Read up on some basic information about fixed gear bicycles ( http://bikeroots.com ). If you want to get an image of some neat riding on fixed gears and what they look like for inspiration, watch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F0AFpq6jFok .
      • Start gathering that information together, answer critical questions about what needs to go into the creation and maintenance of a fixed gear bicycle. ( http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed.html , http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html , http://sheldonbrown.com/deakins/how-to-fixed-conversion.html , http://www.fixedgeargallery.com )
        • For creation – questions like what sort of frame, wheels, and cogs are to be sought out? What will need to be considered before purchasing these parts?
        • For maintenance – what are the most critical components that need to be kept in absolute top working order?
        • Keep in mind these are not the only important things, but some of the priorities need to be decided (and discovered) by you.
        • Finally draft a piece of technical writing that explains two broad subjects. (Writing Tips: http://www.coping.org/write/improvtech.htm , http://freelancefolder.com/ten-great-technical-writing-tips/ )
          • The creation of a fixed gear bicycle and what to look for (since we can't afford to just buy a brand new pre-made bike).
          • The maintenance of a fixed gear bicycle (which will be fairly similar to the maintenance and care of an ordinary bike, but there are some special things to consider).
      Photo: Visivo of Flickr – 03/31/08 2
    • Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
      • Start searching for a bike. ( http://fortcollins.craigslist.org/bik/ , http://www.ebay.com )
        • You'll likely want to begin with a frame. However, if good deals are found on other components first there's no wrong way to shop. Especially if you are getting the best thing possible for the best price possible while working within budget (300$).
        • Search the web to get an idea of prices and what is available, sites like ebay and craigs list can give a good idea. Also, as an extra activity outside the web, talking to local bike shops is never a bad idea.
        • Determine the pieces you will use in your bike proposal. You have two options. You may seek out pieces that are truly available in the area or you may do research and piece together pieces that are not actually for sale. Look to the conclusion for the implications of either choice – real pieces may be harder to find, but there might be a good reward for the extra effort.
      • Create a proposal for the creation of a specific bike. (Writing Tips: http://lifepundit.typepad.com/persuasive_writing )
        • Once all necessary pieces are tracked down, (you should know what is 'necessary' after creating the technical writing piece), write a persuasive piece arguing why the bike you're hoping to build will be a good one.
        • Be sure to explain your rationale for choosing each component, your budget (which should not exceed the class budget of 300$), and why you think your finished bike will be exceptional.
      The Process Photo: Visivo of Flickr – 03/31/08 2
    • Technical Writing: Maintenance and Creation Rubric Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Photo: Rowan of Rovara of Flickr – 03/31/08 2 Persuasive Writing: Why this bike? CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Internet Use Successfully uses suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Usually able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Occasionally able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Needs assistance or supervision to use suggested internet links and/or to navigate within these sites. Organization Information is very organized with well-constructed paragraphs and subheadings. Separate sections for creation and maintenance. Information is organized with well-constructed paragraphs. Separate sections for creation and maintenance. Information is organized, but paragraphs are not well-constructed. Creation and Maintenance sections may be blended. The information appears to be disorganized. Creation and/or maintenance may be left out. Quality of Information Information clearly relates to the main topic. Points include several supporting details and/or examples. Information clearly relates to the main topic. Points are provided with 1-2 supporting details and/or examples. Information clearly relates to the main topic. No details and/or examples are given. Information has little or nothing to do with the main topic. Sources All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented in the desired format. All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented, but a few are not in the desired format. All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented, but many are not in the desired format. Some sources are not accurately documented. Mechanics No grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors. Almost no grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors A few grammatical spelling, or punctuation errors. Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. CATEGORY 4 - Above Standards 3 - Meets Standards 2 - Approaching Standards 1 - Below Standards Evidence and Examples All of the evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author's position. Great detail is given about each bike component and the overall rationale. Most of the evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author's position. Detail is given about all important components, overall rationale is acceptable. At least one of the pieces of evidence and examples is relevant and has an explanation that shows how that piece of evidence supports the author's position. Some important bike components may be left out, rationale needs some work. Evidence and examples are NOT relevant AND/OR are not explained. Many essential bike components are missing, rationale may be ineffective or entirely left out. Support for Position Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement in the overall rationale about, "why this bike?" The writer anticipates the reader's concerns, biases or arguments and has provided at least 1 counter-argument. Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement in the overall rationale about, "why this bike?" Includes 2 pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement in the overall rationale about, "why this bike?" Includes 1 or fewer pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) in the overall rationale about, "why this bike?" Accuracy All supportive facts and statistics are reported accurately. Almost all supportive facts and statistics are reported accurately. Most supportive facts and statistics are reported accurately. Most supportive facts and statistics were inaccurately reported. Sources All sources used for quotes, statistics and facts are credible and cited correctly. All sources used for quotes, statistics and facts are credible and most are cited correctly. Most sources used for quotes, statistics and facts are credible and cited correctly. Many sources are suspect (not credible) AND/OR are not cited correctly. Grammar & Spelling Author makes no errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Author makes 1-2 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Author makes 3-4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Author makes more than 4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.
    • Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] By now, you should have learned quite a lot about bikes in general, and especially fixed gear bicycles. If you get a new bike, you're now better able to take care of it yourself, instead of paying a local shop expensive tune up costs. Plus, you've created a reference you can use or share with your friends who have bikes about the care and maintenance of bicycles, if you so choose. But the exciting part is the proposal to build a bike. If you've chosen to seek out real pieces (instead of the somewhat easier 'realistic' pieces), you can now submit your proposal to your teacher. There will be a student vote on all of these real proposals to try and determine the 'best bike yet to be built.' The winner of that vote will get 300$ real dollars from the pocket of your teacher that will go to this project, and that bike will actually be created by you and your peers as an extra curricular activity. And since your teacher knows that you now know a lot about bikes, but may not necessarily be as interested in them as he is, the winner may do whatever he/she wishes with the new bike (as long as it doesn't get thrown away or abandoned). Good luck! 2 Photo: Placid Casual of Flickr – 03/31/08
    • Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] All images found through http://www.flickr.com – photographers profile names given with each image. Web Sources Accessed: http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/ - collection of resources, and pictures for added inspiration http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed.html – good information on a variety of fixed gear related issues http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html – more specific information regarding converting bikes to be fixed gear http://sheldonbrown.com/deakins/how-to-fixed-conversion.html – additional information not included in the page above http://bikeroots.com/ - basic information to consider and a few useful links http://www.63xc.com/gregg/101_1.htm – riding the bike, Fixed Gear 101, good information http://fortcollins.craigslist.org/bik/ - bikes page of local craigslist, very good place to start the search for bikes to convert and parts http://lifepundit.typepad.com/persuasive_writing/ - writing tips from a professional writer http://www.coping.org/write/improvtech.htm – technical writing tips http://freelancefolder.com/ten-great-technical-writing-tips/ - more technical writing tips http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/articles/scottlarkin1.htm – not really a resource, but a beautiful article Accessibility: The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group 2
    • The Creation of a Fixed Gear (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page 8 th – 10 th Grade English Designed by Andrew Starkey [email_address] Evaluation Conclusion Photo: Tunaboat of Flickr – 03/31/08 2
    • Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page For this lesson, I wanted to combine real world interaction (outside of a textbook), tangible incentive for the students, exercises in English writing, and a hobby that I truly enjoy, all into a school related activity that I hope some students would potentially enjoy. Students will draft two works. One is a document based off of research that will demonstrate the students’ ability to produce technical writing. They will write about the creation and also the maintenance of bicycles, and specifically fixed gear bicycles. The other will be a persuasive writing piece. Included in that piece will be a plan to create an actual bicycle and the purpose of their writing will be to persuade their teacher, in this case me, to help them acquire or buy the bike that they have planned. One student each time this project is done will be lucky enough (by peer vote) to actually receive my financial aid out of pocket for this project. The assembly of the bike will be an extra curricular activity, and I would more than happily fund such a project each year. Evaluation 2 Conclusion
    • Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This activity is intended for students in the earlier grades in high school, or students that especially excel in upper middle school. I have created assignments suitable for an English classroom setting of a grade level from 8 th – 10 th grade. There is minor math work involved, and creative teachers may be able to integrate lessons in math or physics – but the purpose of this webquest was to apply the idea to an English classroom using writing assignments. Students should have some understanding of technical writing and persuasive writing beforehand. This is a lesson that would be best used as a culminating proof that they have learned these writing styles after doing some previous work or activities learning them. Evaluation 2 Conclusion
    • Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Colorado English Standards, Reading and Writing: Standard 1: Using a full range of strategies to comprehend technical writing, newspapers, magazines, poetry, short stories, plays, and novels in addition to the types of reading material mentioned above. Students extend their thinking and understanding as they read stories about people from similar and different backgrounds. Use information from their reading to increase vocabulary and enhance language usage. Standard 2: conveying technical information in a written form appropriate to the audience. supporting an opinion using various forms of persuasion (factual or emotional) in speaking and writing. selecting a focused topic and drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading a legible final copy. Standard 4: using reading, writing, listening, articulate speaking, and viewing to solve problems. Standard 5: using available technology to access information, conduct research, and produce a carefully documented product. locating information appropriate for their reading and writing purposes such as career and academic interest, leisure time, and self-improvement giving precise, formal credit for others' ideas, images, or information Evaluation 2 Conclusion
    • The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
      • Read up on some basic information about fixed gear bicycles (link). If you want to get an image of some neat riding on fixed gears and what they look like for inspiration, watch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F0AFpq6jFok .
      • Start gathering that information together, answer critical questions about what needs to go into the creation and maintenance of a fixed gear bicycle. ( http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed.html , http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html , http://sheldonbrown.com/deakins/how-to-fixed-conversion.html,http://bikeroots.com,http://www.fixedgeargallery.com )
        • For creation – questions like what sort of frame, wheels, and cogs are to be sought out? What will need to be considered before purchasing these parts?
        • For maintenance – what are the most critical components that need to be kept in absolute top working order?
        • Keep in mind these are not the only important things, but some of the priorities need to be decided (and discovered) by you.
        • Finally draft a piece of technical writing that explains two broad subjects. (Writing Tips: http://www.coping.org/write/improvtech.htm , http://freelancefolder.com/ten-great-technical-writing-tips/ )
          • The creation of a fixed gear bicycle and what to look for (since we can't afford to just buy a brand new pre-made bike).
          • The maintenance of a fixed gear bicycle (which will be fairly similar to the maintenance and care of an ordinary bike, but there are some special things to consider).
      • Variation:
      • Students may choose to work individually or in small groups of 2-3. Viable roles in groups are chief editor and writer (for those not at all interested in bikes), mechanic/bike builder (one who finds the data and details necessary about the bikes), market expert (one who searches where to acquire parts and bike stuff for the best prices). If such grouping is allowed, some editing of the process will need to take place, and not every student will be graded on the exact same work.
      Evaluation 2 Conclusion
    • The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
      • Start searching for a bike. ( http://fortcollins.craigslist.org/bik/,http://www.ebay.com ,)
        • You'll likely want to begin with a frame, but if good deals are found on other components first there's no wrong way to shop if you are getting the best thing possible for the best price possible - as long as you're working within budget.
        • Search the web to get an idea of prices and what is available, sites like ebay and craigs list can give a good idea. Also, as an extra activity outside the web – talking to local bike shops is never a bad idea.
        • Determine the pieces you will use in your bike proposal. You have two options. You may seek out pieces that are truly available in the area – or you may do research and piece together pieces that are not actually for sale. Look to the conclusion for the implications of either choice – real pieces may be harder to find, but there might be a good reward for the extra effort.
      • Create a proposal for the creation of a specific bike. (Writing Tips: http://lifepundit.typepad.com/persuasive_writing )
        • Once all necessary pieces are tracked down, (you should know what is 'necessary' after creating the technical writing piece), write a persuasive piece arguing why the bike you're hoping to build will be a good one.
        • Be sure to explain your rationale for choosing each component, your budget (which should not exceed the class budget of 250$), and why you think your finished bike will be exceptional.
      Evaluation 2 Conclusion
    • Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Students will need ample time and ability to access the websites listed on the process pages. For the webquest itself, that is the only necessary requirement that might be challenging. Students will obviously need to have access to a computer for the writing of the two pieces, and should have a way to print out their writing so that it may be turned in. I designed this lesson with the idea that I would be able to accomplish it from beginning to end with only my students and I working to get it done. However, I certainly would not turn down outside help. Parents of students may take their child to bike shops, for example. No outside assistance should be necessary though. Web Sites Referenced: http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/ - collection of resources, and pictures for added inspiration http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed.html – good information on a variety of fixed gear related issues http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html – more specific information regarding converting bikes to be fixed gear http://sheldonbrown.com/deakins/how-to-fixed-conversion.html – additional information not included in the page above http://bikeroots.com/ - basic information to consider and a few useful links http://www.63xc.com/gregg/101_1.htm – riding the bike, Fixed Gear 101, good information http://fortcollins.craigslist.org/bik/ - bikes page of local craigslist, very good place to start the search for bikes to convert and parts http://lifepundit.typepad.com/persuasive_writing/ - writing tips from a professional writer http://www.coping.org/write/improvtech.htm – technical writing tips http://freelancefolder.com/ten-great-technical-writing-tips/ - more technical writing tips http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/articles/scottlarkin1.htm – not really a resource, but a beautiful article Evaluation 2 Conclusion
    • [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation 2 Rubric for Evaluation : Technical Writing: Maintenance and Creation Rubric Rubric for Evaluation : Persuasive Writing: Why this bike? Conclusion CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Internet Use Successfully uses suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Usually able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Occasionally able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Needs assistance or supervision to use suggested internet links and/or to navigate within these sites. Organization Information is very organized with well-constructed paragraphs and subheadings. Separate sections for creation and maintenance. Information is organized with well-constructed paragraphs. Separate sections for creation and maintenance. Information is organized, but paragraphs are not well-constructed. Creation and Maintenance sections may be blended. The information appears to be disorganized. Creation and/or maintenance may be left out. Quality of Information Information clearly relates to the main topic. Points include several supporting details and/or examples. Information clearly relates to the main topic. Points are provided with 1-2 supporting details and/or examples. Information clearly relates to the main topic. No details and/or examples are given. Information has little or nothing to do with the main topic. Sources All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented in the desired format. All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented, but a few are not in the desired format. All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented, but many are not in the desired format. Some sources are not accurately documented. Mechanics No grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors. Almost no grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors A few grammatical spelling, or punctuation errors. Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. CATEGORY 4 - Above Standards 3 - Meets Standards 2 - Approaching Standards 1 - Below Standards Evidence and Examples All of the evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author's position. Great detail is given about each bike component and the overall rationale. Most of the evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author's position. Detail is given about all important components, overall rationale is acceptable. At least one of the pieces of evidence and examples is relevant and has an explanation that shows how that piece of evidence supports the author's position. Some important bike components may be left out, rationale needs some work. Evidence and examples are NOT relevant AND/OR are not explained. Many essential bike components are missing, rationale may be ineffective or entirely left out. Support for Position Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement in the overall rationale about, "why this bike?" The writer anticipates the reader's concerns, biases or arguments and has provided at least 1 counter-argument. Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement in the overall rationale about, "why this bike?" Includes 2 pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement in the overall rationale about, "why this bike?" Includes 1 or fewer pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) in the overall rationale about, "why this bike?" Accuracy All supportive facts and statistics are reported accurately. Almost all supportive facts and statistics are reported accurately. Most supportive facts and statistics are reported accurately. Most supportive facts and statistics were inaccurately reported. Sources All sources used for quotes, statistics and facts are credible and cited correctly. All sources used for quotes, statistics and facts are credible and most are cited correctly. Most sources used for quotes, statistics and facts are credible and cited correctly. Many sources are suspect (not credible) AND/OR are not cited correctly. Grammar & Spelling Author makes no errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Author makes 1-2 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Author makes 3-4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Author makes more than 4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.
    • Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page When I was a student in high school, we didn’t produce or work with technical writing at all (apart from occasionally reading from textbooks). The prospect of technical writing just sounds dull, so I wanted to create something that might be fun for at least some students. Seeing that it is an important style of writing, this assignment will provide a good exercise to students. The persuasive writing portion of the assignment was created with similar motivations. All of my persuasive writing for school has been of the “argue for position X or Y” style, I’ve never actually felt like I was producing anything real. Though the lessons I did have helped – I have written multiple letters trying to persuade others in proposals or opinions since high school – they never were like those letters that I wrote. This will give students a chance to create persuasive writing for something much more tangible than world issues, politics, or morals, and will hopefully inspire a bit more enthusiasm and fun. Plus, any chance I can have as a teacher to integrate some of my own personality and life into the classroom will help my own enthusiasm and hopefully make my class more interesting and real to the students. Evaluation Conclusion 2
    • Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page All images found through http://www.flickr.com – photographers profile names given with each image. Web Sources Accessed: http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/ - collection of resources, and pictures for added inspiration http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed.html – good information on a variety of fixed gear related issues http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html – more specific information regarding converting bikes to be fixed gear http://sheldonbrown.com/deakins/how-to-fixed-conversion.html – additional information not included in the page above http://bikeroots.com/ - basic information to consider and a few useful links http://www.63xc.com/gregg/101_1.htm – riding the bike, Fixed Gear 101, good information http://fortcollins.craigslist.org/bik/ - bikes page of local craigslist, very good place to start the search for bikes to convert and parts http://lifepundit.typepad.com/persuasive_writing/ - writing tips from a professional writer http://www.coping.org/write/improvtech.htm – technical writing tips http://freelancefolder.com/ten-great-technical-writing-tips/ - more technical writing tips http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/articles/scottlarkin1.htm – not really a resource, but a beautiful article Accessibility: The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group Evaluation 2 Conclusion