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Do-It-Yourself PR--LWL Atlanta 2010
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Do-It-Yourself PR--LWL Atlanta 2010

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  • 1. Ladies Who Launch-Atlanta Do-it-Yourself PR Strategies March 10, 2010 The Basics: Understanding and Developing a PR Strategy: Remember your 5 W’s:  What is PR? the public’s perception (or lack thereof) of your brand, product or service  Why do you need PR? increases your visibility, increases the credibility and legitimacy of your business, can lead to more clients and increased sales (in conjunction with other efforts)  When should you use PR? when you have a unique story, product or service to tell; when you are trying to share your message and ideas with a broader audience; when you want to increase your visibility and credibility as a business owner  Who cares? determine your audience; who would be most interested in your story, your product or your service  Where should you try to “pitch” your story or idea? find out where your audience hangs out—what do they read, listen to, watch; who do they listen to? Key questions: What makes my product/service unique or different? What’s my story or angle? Why is it relevant and newsworthy NOW? Who might be interested in hearing my story? How do I reach the people who might want to hear my story or buy my product or service? Be Prepared: What you’ll need before you get started:  A bio (one to two paragraphs about you and what makes you fabulous—don’t be shy—brag!)  A short (one to two paragraphs) description of your product or service  A headshot; saved as a jpeg or other digital format; resolution of at least 300 x 300 dpi  A logo (if applicable)  Links/clips of previous interviews, reviews, appearances (if applicable)  A quote sheet: people bragging about your product or service (optional, but another great tool) Bonus: Have these all easily accessible and downloadable on your website. DO NOT ATTACH these documents in emails to reporters, producers, etc. unless you were asked to send them!
  • 2. PR Pitching 101 1. Do your homework:  Figure out where your audience hangs out  Read articles and blogs, watch segments, listen to shows: find out what stories are being told and by whom  Identify the right contact: in large print publications (magazines and newspapers), reporters and editors are generally identified by subject matter (health, sports, business, lifestyle, etc) or geography (South Fulton, Dekalb County, etc); otherwise, try a “news editor” research or follow your targets online to get a sense of personality and what stories interest them  Don’t forget the “little guys.” Neighborhood newspapers, small satellite radio shows, blogs are great places to get started and get your feet wet without too much rejection! Cheat sheet: HARO (www.helpareporter.com) and Guru.com 2. The pitch:  Keep it short, simple, to the point—2-3 sentences; point is just to get someone interested; you can share more later!  Make it relevant—find a “hook” or “angle;” why this story and why now?  PRACTICE!  Remember that reporters/producers/bloggersneed CONTENT—you’re providing a service!  Don’t include attachments unless asked  Follow-up, but not aggressively; reporters, bloggers and producers are busy; it’s fine to touch base 5-10 days later with a gentle nudge Great read: Amber Naslund, Altitude Branding, “The Pitch that Worked” http://altitudebranding.com/2010/03/the-pitch-that-worked/ Using Social Media as a Public Relations Tool Benefits:  YOU can control and create content; photos, blogs, videos, stories—people can find you  No more gatekeepers; you can reach out to reporters, bloggers and producers directly  It’s a two-way conversation; again, you have something valuable to share! How to:  Follow reporters, bloggers, producers and people who cover or might be interested in your product  Start to learn habits and deadlines (i.e. 11 Alive has morning “news meetings” around 10:30am); easy to gauge on Twitter  Use tools like Google Alerts and search; people may be talking about you already!  Engage in conversations and chats about your industry; remember YOU are an expert!  Become a resource for others  Practice, practice, practice!

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