Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Plenary1 m  cecchini
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Plenary1 m cecchini

180

Published on

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
180
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. How Do We Maximize the Health and Economic Benefits of Prevention? Franco Sassi, PhD Michele Cecchini, MD, MSc Health Division
  • 2. Obesity: a Growing Problem
  • 3. Inequalities in Overweight Education Level
  • 4. Expectations Must Be Realistic
    • Does prevention improve health?
    • Does it reduce health expenditure?
    • Does it improve health inequalities?
    • Is it cost-effective?
  • 5. Interventions Health education and health promotion Regulation and fiscal measures Primary-care based interventions Mass media campaigns Fiscal measures (fruit and vegetables and foods high in fat) Physician counselling of individuals at risk School-based interventions Government regulation or industry self-regulation of food advertising to children Intensive physician and dietician counselling of individuals at risk Worksite interventions Compulsory food labelling
  • 6. Prevention Does Save Lives… 1 LY/DALY every 115/121 people 1 LY/DALY every 12/10 people
  • 7. Health Outcomes over Time England
  • 8. … But Does Not Always Save Money!
  • 9. Impact on Inequalities Worksite interventions Fiscal measures
  • 10. Prevention is a Good Long-Term Investment
  • 11. The Key to Success
    • Governments should adopt “horizontal” approaches
    • Multi-stakeholder approach
    • Effective prevention strategies must combine complementary strengths
      • population approaches
      • individual (high-risk) approaches
  • 12. Prevention is Everyone’s Business International Organizations Civil society Private industry Interest groups Government Academia Ministry of Agriculture Ministry of Health Ministry of Education Ministry of Transport
  • 13. A Multi-Stakeholder Approach Reducing Trans Fat in Korea
    • Collaboration between industry, universities, research institutes and government
    • Content of trans fat to be compulsory on the label of child food products
    • Government (KFDA) provides R&D support for the industry
  • 14. Policy Implications
    • Prevention is an effective and cost-effective way to improve population health
    • Prevention can decrease health expenditure and improve inequalities, but not to a major degree
    • Comprehensive strategies combining population and individual approaches provide best results
    • Involvement of relevant stakeholders is key to the success of prevention
  • 15. OECD Work on Prevention
    • Obesity and the economics of prevention: fit not fat
    • OECD health working papers HWP 32, 45, 46, 48
    • Paper in Lancet series on chronic diseases
    www.oecd.org/health/fitnotfat [email_address]

×