The Start Up of You Executive Summary
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

The Start Up of You Executive Summary

  • 3,787 views
Uploaded on

A Visual Summary of a recommended book for every professional by Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha

A Visual Summary of a recommended book for every professional by Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
3,787
On Slideshare
3,452
From Embeds
335
Number of Embeds
7

Actions

Shares
Downloads
186
Comments
0
Likes
19

Embeds 335

http://www.scoop.it 231
https://twitter.com 90
http://elainetarget.wordpress.com 4
http://www.linkedin.com 3
http://www.pinterest.com 3
http://pinterest.com 2
https://www.linkedin.com 2

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. THE START-UP OF YOUEXECUTIVE SUMMARY
  • 2. AUTHORS REID HOFFMAN BEN CASNOCHACofounder and Chairman of Entrepreneur and Author
  • 3. CHAPTER 1: ALL HUMANS ARE ENTREPRENEURSCHAPTER 2: DEVELOP A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGECHAPTER 3: PLAN TO ADAPTCHAPTER 4: IT TAKES A NETWORKCHAPTER 5: PURSUE BREAKOUT OPPORTUNITIESCHAPTER 6: TAKE INTELLIGENT RISKSCHAPTER 7: WHO YOU KNOW IS WHAT YOU KNOW
  • 4. All human beingsare entrepreneurs.When we were in the caves,we were all self-employed...finding our food, feedingourselves. That’s wherehuman history began. Ascivilization came, we suppressedit. We became “labor” becausethey stamped us, “You are labor.”We forgot that we are entrepreneurs.—MUHAMMAD YUNUS Nobel Peace Prize winner and microfinance pioneer
  • 5. To adapt to the CHALLENGES of professional life today...
  • 6. We need to rediscover our ENTREPRENEURIAL INSTINCTS and use them to forge new sorts of careers.
  • 7. Whether you’re a lawyer ordoctor or teacher or engineer or even a business owner...
  • 8. Today you need to also think ofyourself as an entrepreneur at thehelm of at least one living, growingstart-up venture: YOUR CAREER.
  • 9. The old career escalator is JAMMED.
  • 10. Age-old assumptions about work have come UNDONE.
  • 11. There are NEW RULES, and you need to know them —or else you may be on track to IRRELEVANCE.
  • 12. 2The solution has two parts.
  • 13. FIRST, a mindset ofPERMANENT BETA
  • 14. FIRST, a mindset ofPERMANENT BETA
  • 15. FIRST, a mindset ofPERMANENT BETA• Think of yourself as a WORK-IN-PROGRESS.
  • 16. FIRST, a mindset ofPERMANENT BETA• Think of yourself as a WORK-IN-PROGRESS.• INVEST IN YOURSELF every single day.
  • 17. Second, an entrepreneurial, adaptive SKILL SETtaken from the very best of Silicon Valley.
  • 18. It’s these SKILLS that we explain in the chapters ahead.
  • 19. CHAPTER 1: ALL HUMANS ARE ENTREPRENEURSCHAPTER 2: DEVELOP A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGECHAPTER 3: PLAN TO ADAPTCHAPTER 4: IT TAKES A NETWORKCHAPTER 5: PURSUE BREAKOUT OPPORTUNITIESCHAPTER 6: TAKE INTELLIGENT RISKSCHAPTER 7: WHO YOU KNOW IS WHAT YOU KNOW
  • 20. Differentiate or die.
  • 21. Differentiate or die. To beat the competition, companies developCLEAR REASONS WHY a customer should pick them instead of others.
  • 22. Zappos massively DIFFERENTIATED ITSELFfrom other e-commerce companies by offering free shipping both ways and 24/7 customer service via a locally staffed 1-800 number.
  • 23. Similarly, in a world whereA MILLION PEOPLE CAN DO YOUR JOB...
  • 24. CHART A CAREER PATHthat sets you apart from other professionals.
  • 25. You don’t need to be better than all professionals.
  • 26. You don’t need to be better than all professionals. You just need to be better in a LOCAL, PROFESSIONAL NICHE.
  • 27. THREE DYNAMIC, CHANGING PUZZLE PIECES comprise your position in the market and, when paired with a plan, determine the course you should head in.
  • 28. 1. ASSETSWhat you have going for you now.
  • 29. 1. ASSETS What you have going for you now. Your SOFT ASSETS(e.g., knowledge, skills, connections)
  • 30. 1. ASSETS What you have going for you now. Your SOFT ASSETS Your HARD ASSETS(e.g., knowledge, skills, connections) (e.g., cash in the bank)
  • 31. 2. ASPIRATIONS & VALUES Where you might like to go in the future.
  • 32. 3. MARKET REALITIESWhat people will actuallypay you for.
  • 33. One without the others DOESN’T WORK.
  • 34. Skills that can’t earn moneyWON’T GET YOU VERY FAR.
  • 35. Following your bliss but notbeing very good at your blissWON’T BE TOO BLISSFULafter long.
  • 36. And being a slave to the market regardless of your likes and passions ISN’T SUSTAINABLE over the long run.
  • 37. One way to upgrade your competitive position is byupgrading your assets—i.e., INVESTING IN YOURSELF.
  • 38. You can also become more competitive by CHANGING THE ENVIRONMENT you play in.
  • 39. Some American basketball players not good enough to play in the NBA play SUCCESSFULLY in Europe.
  • 40. Their SKILLS don’t change, but the MARKET does.
  • 41. Picking a MARKET NICHE where you’re better than the competition is key to entrepreneurial strategy.
  • 42. CHAPTER 1: ALL HUMANS ARE ENTREPRENEURSCHAPTER 2: DEVELOP A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGECHAPTER 3: PLAN TO ADAPTCHAPTER 4: IT TAKES A NETWORKCHAPTER 5: PURSUE BREAKOUT OPPORTUNITIESCHAPTER 6: TAKE INTELLIGENT RISKSCHAPTER 7: WHO YOU KNOW IS WHAT YOU KNOW
  • 43. POPULAR CAREER PLANNING ADVICEsays you should decide where you want to be in10 years and then develop a plan for getting there.
  • 44. POPULAR CAREER PLANNING ADVICEsays you should find your passionand then pursue it.
  • 45. These philosophies have serious strengths, but also HUGE DRAWBACKS.
  • 46. They presume A STATIC WORLD.
  • 47. They presume A STATIC WORLD. In fact, you CHANGE, the competition CHANGES, and the world CHANGES.
  • 48. They presume that fixed, accurate self-knowledgecan be easily attained through INTROSPECTION.
  • 49. They presume that fixed, accurate self-knowledgecan be easily attained through INTROSPECTION. In fact, your identity is not found through introspection but rather emerges through EXPERIMENTATION.
  • 50. Entrepreneurial career planning and adapting is about being FLEXIBLYPERSISTENT always ready to adapt, but alsopersistent in driving toward goals.
  • 51. MAKE EXPLICIT THEASSUMPTIONS ANDHYPOTHESES INYOUR PLAN.
  • 52. MAKE EXPLICIT THEASSUMPTIONS ANDHYPOTHESES INYOUR PLAN. You’ll never have complete certainty.
  • 53. MAKE EXPLICIT THEASSUMPTIONS ANDHYPOTHESES INYOUR PLAN. Identify areas of incomplete knowledge about yourself or your industry...
  • 54. MAKE EXPLICIT THEASSUMPTIONS ANDHYPOTHESES INYOUR PLAN. ...and make plans that will help you FILL THOSE GAPS.
  • 55. PRIORITIZE LEARNING. >
  • 56. PRIORITIZE LEARNING. > Just as start-ups in the early days prioritize learning over profitability...
  • 57. PRIORITIZE LEARNING. > ...so should you prioritize learning (soft assets) overcash salary (hard assets) for the majority of your career.
  • 58. PRIORITIZE LEARNING. > In the long run, you’ll likely lead A MORE MEANINGFUL LIFE, as well as make more money.
  • 59. LEARNBY DOING.
  • 60. LEARNBY DOING.ACTIONS, NOT PLANS,will generate the lessonsthat help you adapt tothe next phase of yourjourney.
  • 61. THINK TWOSTEPS AHEAD.
  • 62. THINK TWOSTEPS AHEAD.What next move will MAXIMIZEthe quantity and quality offollow-on opportunities?
  • 63. Then craft an experimental PLAN A, an alternative PLAN B, and an unchanging, certain PLAN Z.
  • 64. PLAN AWhat you’re doing now.Your current implementation ofyour competitive advantage.
  • 65. PLAN BYou pivot to B whenyour plan isn’t workingor when you discovera better way towardyour goal.
  • 66. PLAN ZYou shift to Z if something goes seriouslywrong. It’s the lifeboat you can jump in ifyour plan fails and you need to reloadbefore getting back in the game.
  • 67. Did you know thatstarted out as a multiplayer online game?
  • 68. Did you know thatstarted out as a “digital wallet” for storage only?
  • 69. Did you know that JERRY SPRINGERwas mayor of Cincinnati?
  • 70. Did you know that SHERYL SANDBERGbegan her career in India? There, she worked on public health projects for the World Bank.
  • 71. An experimental PLAN A,
  • 72. An experimental PLAN A,an alternative PLAN B, and
  • 73. An experimental PLAN A, an alternative PLAN B, andan unchanging, certain PLAN Z.
  • 74. An experimental PLAN A, an alternative PLAN B, and an unchanging, certain PLAN Z. This isABZ PLANNING .
  • 75. CHAPTER 1: ALL HUMANS ARE ENTREPRENEURSCHAPTER 2: DEVELOP A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGECHAPTER 3: PLAN TO ADAPTCHAPTER 4: IT TAKES A NETWORKCHAPTER 5: PURSUE BREAKOUT OPPORTUNITIESCHAPTER 6: TAKE INTELLIGENT RISKSCHAPTER 7: WHO YOU KNOW IS WHAT YOU KNOW
  • 76. Relationships matter to your career no matter theorganization or your level of seniority because, ultimately,EVERY JOB BOILS DOWN TO INTERACTING WITH PEOPLE.
  • 77. People controlRESOURCES, OPPORTUNITIES, INFORMATION and the like.
  • 78. And THE PEOPLE YOU SPEND TIME WITH shape the person you are today and the person you aspire to be tomorrow.
  • 79. I Think of it as “I-to-the-We”. WeAn individual’s power is raised exponentially with the help of a team (a network).
  • 80. There are people you know in a PERSONAL context.
  • 81. There are people you know in a PROFESSIONAL context.
  • 82. Generally, you keep the two livesS E P A R A T E for reasons of both etiquette and potential conflict of loyalties.
  • 83. However, sometimes you’re PERSONALfriends with a PROFESSIONAL colleague.
  • 84. In these instances,THE CONTEXTin which you engagethe person shapesthe right approach.
  • 85. 2 There are two types ofPROFESSIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
  • 86. 1. ALLIESPeople you consult regularly for advice. You trust their JUDGMENT.
  • 87. Second, youPROACTIVELY COLLABORATE on opportunities together.
  • 88. You keep your antenna especially attuned to an ally’s INTERESTS, and when it makes sense to pursue something jointly, you do so.
  • 89. Third, you talk up an ally to other friends. You PROMOTE his or her brand.
  • 90. When an ally comes into conflict, you DEFEND him, and stand up for his reputation.And he does the same for you when times get tough.
  • 91. 2. WEAKER TIES AND ACQUAINTANCES
  • 92. While not as vital as allies, acquaintances usually INTRODUCE DIVERSITY to your network.
  • 93. They tend to hail from different social circles orindustries and so they can be useful to find opportunities or intelligence OUTSIDE YOUR INNER CIRCLE.
  • 94. While there’s a limit to the number ofpeople you can ever know at one time...
  • 95. ...you are part of a broader network of FRIENDS OF FRIENDS and FRIENDS OF FRIENDS OF FRIENDS—second and third degree connections—for which there is VIRTUALLY NO LIMIT.
  • 96. Your network isBIGGER than you think.
  • 97. If you’re connected to a couple hundred people on LinkedIn, you’re actually at the center of an extended network MORE THAN TWO MILLION PEOPLE STRONG.
  • 98. If you’re not asking for or giving INTRODUCTIONS to these second or third degree connections, you are not fully leveraging your network.
  • 99. Finally, rememberthat relationshipsare like any living thing...
  • 100. If they’re not gettingSTRONGER,they’re gettingWEAKER.
  • 101. STRENGTHENRELATIONSHIPSby sending articles,making introductions,collaborating on projects,and staying in touch.
  • 102. Consider creating anINTERESTINGPEOPLE FUNDto which you automaticallyfunnel a certain percentageof your paycheck.
  • 103. Use it to pay for coffees,lunches, and the occasionalplane ticket to meet newpeople and shore upexisting relationships.
  • 104. CHAPTER 1: ALL HUMANS ARE ENTREPRENEURSCHAPTER 2: DEVELOP A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGECHAPTER 3: PLAN TO ADAPTCHAPTER 4: IT TAKES A NETWORKCHAPTER 5: PURSUE BREAKOUT OPPORTUNITIESCHAPTER 6: TAKE INTELLIGENT RISKSCHAPTER 7: WHO YOU KNOW IS WHAT YOU KNOW
  • 105. The trajectories of remarkable careers are NOT slow and steady up and to the right.
  • 106. Rather, they are marked byBREAKOUT OPPORTUNITIES—career experiences that lead to unusually rapid gains.
  • 107. You can develop HABITS OF BEHAVIOR that increase the likelihood you find great career opportunities.
  • 108. BE IN MOTION AND COURTSELECTIVE RANDOMNESS.
  • 109. When you do something, you stir thepot and introduce the possibility that...
  • 110. ...seemingly random ideas, people, and places willcollide and form new combinations and opportunities.
  • 111. TAP THE NETWORKS AND ASSOCIATIONS OF PEOPLE.
  • 112. OPPORTUNITIES do not float like clouds in the sky.
  • 113. Theyre attached to PEOPLE.
  • 114. If youre looking for an OPPORTUNITY,including one that has a financial payoff,youre really looking for a PERSON.
  • 115. Join CONFERENCES and CLUBS.
  • 116. Better yet, START YOUR OWN.
  • 117. There will be times when your back’s against the wall,when you’re low on resources or time, and when you’ll have to get scrappy and HUSTLE for opportunities.
  • 118. Constraints can be a blessing in disguise:it’s amazing how RESOURCEFUL one can getwhen one has no choice but to be resourceful.
  • 119. The founders of Airbnb were running out of cash, but they still believed in their idea.
  • 120. To buy more time to figure out a way to scale their business, they did what any hustling entrepreneur would do...
  • 121. They sold cereal.
  • 122. Riding presidential election fever, they developedcustom-designed cereal boxes for the candidates.
  • 123. And the extra cash — $20,000 in profit — bought themenough time to figure out how to turn a consistent profit.
  • 124. CHAPTER 1: ALL HUMANS ARE ENTREPRENEURSCHAPTER 2: DEVELOP A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGECHAPTER 3: PLAN TO ADAPTCHAPTER 4: IT TAKES A NETWORKCHAPTER 5: PURSUE BREAKOUT OPPORTUNITIESCHAPTER 6: TAKE INTELLIGENT RISKSCHAPTER 7: WHO YOU KNOW IS WHAT YOU KNOW
  • 125. Risk tends to get a BAD rap.
  • 126. We associate it with things like LOSING MONEY in the stock market...
  • 127. ...or riding a motorcycleWITHOUT A HELMET.
  • 128. But risk isn’t the enemy—it’s aPERMANENT PART OF LIFE.
  • 129. In fact, being proactively INTELLIGENTabout risk is a prerequisite for seizingthose breakout opportunities.
  • 130. There’s COMPETITION for good opportunities.
  • 131. And because of that, if you can intelligently take on risk, you will FIND OPPORTUNITIES others miss.
  • 132. Where others see a RED LIGHT...
  • 133. ...you’ll see GREEN.
  • 134. EVERY possible career move contains RISK.
  • 135. If you don’t have to seriously think aboutthe risk involved in a career opportunity...
  • 136. ...it’s probably NOT the breakout opportunity you’re looking for.
  • 137. Learning how to ACCURATELY ASSESS the level of risk in a situation isn’t easy.
  • 138. Risk is both PERSONAL and SITUATIONAL.
  • 139. What may be risky to youmay NOT be risky to someone else.
  • 140. So here are a few RULES OF THUMB for thinking about the risk associated with opportunities...
  • 141. Overall, it’s probablyNOT AS RISKY as you think.
  • 142. We’re wired for evolutionary reasons to OVERESTIMATE risk.
  • 143. If you can tolerate theWORST-CASE OUTCOME, be open to it.
  • 144. If the worst-case outcome means death, homelessness, or being permanently unemployed, AVOID IT.
  • 145. DON’T CONFLATE UNCERTAINTY WITH RISK.
  • 146. DON’T CONFLATE UNCERTAINTY WITH RISK. There will always be unknowns.
  • 147. DON’T CONFLATE UNCERTAINTY WITH RISK. There will always be unknowns. This doesn’t mean it’s risky.
  • 148. You can never fully predicthow or when ILL-FORTUNE will strike.
  • 149. Instead of placing faith in your abilityto anticipate all that could go wrong...
  • 150. BUILD UP RESILIENCE to unimaginable blowup.
  • 151. Achieve stability by introducing low levels of volatility—by introducing SMALL RISKS ON A REGULAR BASIS.
  • 152. Ideally, your day job hasVOLATILITY BUILT-IN.
  • 153. A freelance editor has toHUSTLE MOREday-to-day than the staff editor.
  • 154. An independent real estate agentGOES HUNGRYMORE DAYSthan the big-company agent.
  • 155. Those whoREGULARLY DEALWITH SMALL RISKS will never starve.
  • 156. CONTROLLED BURNS Those who REGULARLY DEAL WITH SMALL RISKS will never starve.
  • 157. They will never be ENGULFED BY THE BIG RISKS.
  • 158. CHAPTER 1: ALL HUMANS ARE ENTREPRENEURSCHAPTER 2: DEVELOP A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGECHAPTER 3: PLAN TO ADAPTCHAPTER 4: IT TAKES A NETWORKCHAPTER 5: PURSUE BREAKOUT OPPORTUNITIESCHAPTER 6: TAKE INTELLIGENT RISKSCHAPTER 7: WHO YOU KNOW IS WHAT YOU KNOW
  • 159. The most meaningfulway to differentiateyour company fromyour competition, thebest way to put distancebetween you and thecrowd, is to do anoutstanding job withinformation. How yougather, manage, anduse information willdetermine whetheryou win or lose.—BILL GATES
  • 160. This could not be truer today.
  • 161. This could not be truer today. But the way we’ve been socialized tothink about information and knowledge is RADICALLY INSUFFICIENT.
  • 162. Our educational system trains us to MEMORIZE FACTSstored in textbooks and then regurgitate them on an exam.
  • 163. But as a modern professional, you can’t acquire knowledge this way,because the knowledge you need isn’t static— IT’S ALWAYS CHANGING.
  • 164. You CAN’T CRAM your brain with all the relevant information that might possibly be relevant to your careers, then deploy it on exam day.
  • 165. In the world of work, EVERY DAY IS EXAM DAY.
  • 166. EVERY DAY brings new, unpredictable challenges and decisions.
  • 167. Stockpiling facts won’t get you anywhere.
  • 168. Stockpiling facts won’t get you anywhere.What will get you somewhere is being able to access the information you need WHEN YOU NEED IT.
  • 169. You get the intelligence you need to make good career decisions by TALKING TO PEOPLE in your network.
  • 170. IT’S PEOPLE who help you understand yourassets, aspirations, and the market realities.
  • 171. IT’S PEOPLE who help you vet and get introduced to possible allies and trust connections.
  • 172. IT’S PEOPLE who help you track the risk attached to a given opportunity.
  • 173. What you get when you tap into other people’sbrains is called NETWORK INTELLIGENCE.
  • 174. To pull intelligence from your network,you need to MAP YOUR NETWORK so you know who knows what.
  • 175. Then you need to ask questionsthat elicit USEFUL ANSWERS.
  • 176. So START tapping into your network.
  • 177. START investing in skills.
  • 178. START pursuing breakout opportunities.
  • 179. But most of all, START forgingyour own differentiated career plans.
  • 180. But most of all, START forgingyour own differentiated career plans. START adapting these rules to your own adaptive life.
  • 181. For life in PERMANENT BETA,the trick is to NEVER STOP STARTING.
  • 182. The start-up is YOU.
  • 183. READTHE BOOKTO TRANSFORMYOUR CAREER Click Here
  • 184. SHARE THISWITH SOMEONE INYOUR NETWORKAS A SMALL GIFT