Database Search Techniques
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Database Search Techniques

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use to help you search databases more effectively

use to help you search databases more effectively

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  • Put example in color and have “health care reform” come in and then health and care and reform appear later. <br />
  • Animated gif would be great here. <br />
  • Show a screen from EBSCO the same as done for Google Advanced search with arrows and bubbles. Be sure to include full text option. Crop as necessary and make print larger, using more than one page if necessary. <br />

Database Search Techniques Presentation Transcript

  • 1. USING A GENERAL DATABASE – WHY AND TECHNIQUES OBJECTIVE: STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND ADVANCED SEARCH TECHNIQUES INCLUDING THE USE OF QUOTATION MARKS FOR PHRASE SEARCHING, TRUNCATION OR WILD CARD*, AND ADVANCED SEARCH SCREENS. Shoutout to Hemingway Library!!! Thanks for the template!
  • 2. THE WEB VS. DATABASE(S) • Web • Authority varies • Millions of hits • Lots of hits are junk, repackaging, or opinion • Some advanced search features • Info not necessarily published • Databases • Authority high – usually peerreviewed • Maybe thousand of hits at most, more curated • More advanced search features • Info in database is usually published
  • 3. QUOTATION MARKS AND TRUNCATION In library catalogs and article databases, the two most helpful advanced search techniques are: 1) Quotation Marks 2) Truncation or Wild Card
  • 4. QUOTATION MARKS Quotation marks are used around phrases. By using quotations marks, you are telling the computer to only bring back pages with the terms you typed in the exact order you typed them. Example: “health care reform” instead of health AND care AND reform (hey – you saw this in the General Search Strategies video!)
  • 5. For example, if you are interested in finding information on social networking, it is best to search for “social networking” in quotation marks. Otherwise, the computer might search for social AND networking and find many more irrelevant results.
  • 6. TRUNCATION Truncation means to chop off. When you truncate you chop off the end of the word, so the computer can search for multiple endings. For example, your research question includes the keyword education. You can truncate education, so that the computer will find all of the word ending variations. Educat* will find: Education Educate Educated Educating
  • 7. HINTS Be careful where you place the truncation symbol. Educate* will not find education or educating, although it will find educate and educated. Truncation will not find synonyms (i.e. scien* will not find the words botany, biology, or astronomy), although it may bring up articles on those topics IF they include the words science, scientific, or scientist.
  • 8. TO SEARCH MORE PRECISELY IN ARTICLE DATABASES, YOU CAN USE THEIR ADVANCED SEARCH SCREENS.
  • 9. IN ARTICLE DATABASES, YOU CAN ALSO REFINE YOUR SEARCH AFTER REVIEWING YOUR SEARCH RESULTS. This screen shot of the SIRS database shows additional refining options after conducting a search for smoking AND teenagers.
  • 10. NEED HELP? • Mrs. Smithfield is easily contacted! • Amanda.smithfield@mnps.org • 900-0432 (text) • Asmithfield (twitter)