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Interaction Design Style (Part 1 of 5)
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Interaction Design Style (Part 1 of 5)

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Presentation by Christopher Fahey (http://www.behaviordesign.com & http://www.graphpaper.com) about the history and uses of "style" as a component of design innovation, specifically with respect to …

Presentation by Christopher Fahey (http://www.behaviordesign.com & http://www.graphpaper.com) about the history and uses of "style" as a component of design innovation, specifically with respect to interaction design.

Published in: Business, Design

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  • 1.
    • Interaction
    • Design Style (Part 1 of 5)
      • ASIS&T IA Summit
      • Monday, March 24, 2007
  • 2.
    • A last minute addition
    • with no title as yet.
      • ASIS&T IA Summit
      • Monday, March 24, 2007
  • 3.
    • Christopher Fahey
    graphpaper.com
  • 4.  
  • 5.  
  • 6.
    • Fashion = Style
      • “ As for fashion, it is change for its own sake – a constant unbalancing of the status quo, cruelest perhaps to buildings, which would prefer to remain just as they are, heavy and obdurate, a holdout against the times. Buildings are treated by fashion as big, difficult clothing, always lagging embarrassingly behind the mode of the day.”
      • - Stewart Brand, How Buildings Learn
  • 7.
    • Fashion = Style = Art
      • “ Art is radical, but buildings are inherently conservative. Art experiments , experiments fail, art costs extra. Art throws away old, good solutions.”
      • - Stewart Brand, How Buildings Learn
  • 8.  
  • 9.  
  • 10.  
  • 11.
    • What is Style?
  • 12.  
  • 13.  
  • 14.  
  • 15.  
  • 16.  
  • 17.  
  • 18.  
  • 19.  
  • 20.  
  • 21.  
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  • 23.  
  • 24.  
  • 25.  
  • 26.  
  • 27.  
  • 28.  
  • 29.  
  • 30.  
  • 31.
    • What is Style?
      • “ A style is the consequence of recurrent habits, restraints, or rules invented or inherited, written or overheard, intuitive or preconceived.”
      • - Paul Rand, Good Design is Good Will, 1987
      • (as quoted in Steven Heller’s Stylepedia, 2007)
  • 32.
    • Why Style is a Dirty Word
      • Style is superficial, incomplete
      • Style diverts focus from functionality
      • Style-based solutions are impermanent
      • Style is exclusionary and elitist
      • Style provokes “the anxiety of influence”
  • 33.  
  • 34.  
  • 35.
    • Why Style is Good
      • Style encourages innovation
      • Style normalizes practices
      • Style is inspiring
      • Style has emotional impact
      • Style sells
      • Style happens anyway