• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Big Blue Test poster
 

Big Blue Test poster

on

  • 641 views

Presented at the American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions 2012, in Philadelphia

Presented at the American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions 2012, in Philadelphia

Statistics

Views

Total Views
641
Views on SlideShare
416
Embed Views
225

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

5 Embeds 225

http://www.bigbluetest.org 213
http://bigbluetest.org 6
http://staging.bigbluetest.org 3
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 2
http://www.bigbluetest 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Big Blue Test poster Big Blue Test poster Presentation Transcript

    • Effects Of 14 Minutes Of Physical Activity On Blood Glucose Levels S.R. Colberg1 (Human Movement Sciences Dept., Old Dominion University), M.J. Hernandez,2 (Diabetes Hands Foundation)abstract methods results results (cont.)The Big Blue Test (BBT) is a program run by the Diabetes Hands • During the 2011 BBT, data were collected in two ways: 1) • Although 89.2% of total participants (ES and SS)Foundation (DHF) to raise awareness of the importance of physical individuals doing the BBT entered their results on the web • A total of 3,916 people with diabetes completed the BBT, experienced a decrease in blood glucose levels followingactivity in managing diabetes. During the 2011 BBT, data were 78.8% of whom were insulin users (as shown in Table 1). site BigBlueTest.org (in English or Spanish); or 2) at group 14 minutes of physical activity, the decrease wascollected in one of two ways: 1) individuals doing the BBT enteredtheir results on the web site BigBlueTest.org (in English or events (e.g., dance-a-thons and walks), participant results • The types of physical activities that individuals reported significantly greater in insulin users and more of themSpanish); or 2) at group events (e.g., dance-a-thons and walks), were collected and entered post-event by Diabetes Hands doing varied widely, from walking to martial arts and yoga, experienced post-exercise hypoglycemia (p<0.05).participant results were collected and entered post-event by DHF Foundation personnel through the same web site. meaning that their intensity ranged from low to high.personnel through the same web site. All participants were required • Comparing across languages/cultures, only 88.5% of ESto indicate if they have diabetes, the type of physical activity done • All participants were required to indicate their diabetes • English-speaking (ES) participants comprised 83.3% of participants experienced a decrease in blood glucose(ranging widely from walking to martial arts and yoga), blood status, the type of physical activity they chose to do, blood the total, native Spanish-speakers (SS) 16.7% (Table 2). while 92.8% of SS did, with consistent percentages byglucose readings before and after 14 minutes of exercise, and glucose readings obtained through self-monitoring with a culture for insulin and non-insulin users. Hypoglycemicinsulin use. A total of 3,916 people with diabetes completed the blood glucose meter before and after 14 minutes of events after BBT participation was also lower in SS.BBT (78.8% insulin users). exercise, and whether or not they use exogenous insulin.Although 89.2% of participants experienced a decrease in blood Table 2. BLOOD GLUCOSE RESPONSES AND INCIDENCE OF HYPOGLYCEMIA • Only 0.8% of total participants (23 insulin users and 10glucose levels as a result of BBT participation, the decrease was • Since many of the individuals involved in the BBT were IN ENGLISH-SPEAKING (ES) VS. SPANISH-SPEAKING (SS) PARTICIPANTS non-insulin users) recorded no change in blood glucosesignificantly greater in insulin users and more of them experienced native Spanish speakers rather than English speakers, a levels post-exercise, whereas 10.0% of insulin users andpost-exercise hypoglycemia (p<0.05). Only 0.8% of participants (23 secondary purpose of the BBT data collection was to 10.3% of non-insulin users (391 individuals total) All Participants Insulin Users Non-Insulin Usersinsulin users and 10 non-insulin users) recorded no change in blood examine the effect that cultural differences may have had experienced increased levels following BBT participation.glucose levels post-exercise, whereas 391 had increased levels on physical activity participation outcomes. 3,263 2,639 625(10.0% of insulin users, 10.3% of non-insulin users). In conclusion, ES Participant Number (%) (83.3% of all) (80.9% of ES) (19.1% of ES) • A slightly smaller percentage (6.4%) of native SSthe BBT has demonstrated that participation in 14 minutes of • All data were reported as mean±SEM (where appropriate) participants experienced an increase in blood glucose,varying types of physical activity effectively lowers blood glucose and analyzed using non-paired t-tests to compare insulin 653 449 204 SS Participant Number (%) regardless of insulin use, compared to ES participants.levels in most individuals. (16.7% of all) (68.8% of SS) (31.2% of SS) and non-insulin users. Significance was set at p<0.05.introduction results ES Pre-Exercise Blood Glucose (mg/dL) 156.0 ± 1.0 159.7 ± 1.1* 140.4 ± 1.6 conclusion SS Pre-Exercise Blood In conclusion, the BBT has demonstrated that participation inFor most people with any type of diabetes, engaging in Glucose (mg/dL) 150.9 ± 2.1 156.0 ± 2.5* 140.1 ± 3.5 14 minutes of varying types of physical activity effectivelyphysical activity has a blood glucose lowering effect and Table 1. BLOOD GLUCOSE RESPONSES AND INCIDENCE OF HYPOGLYCEMIA ES Post-Exercise Blood lowers blood glucose levels in most individuals with diabetes.can assist in diabetes management.1 Hypoglycemia Glucose (mg/dL) 123.3 ± 0.9 124.6 ± 1.0* 117.4 ± 1.4(defined as a blood glucose <65 mg/dL) can also result All Participants Insulin Users Non-Insulin Users SS Post-Exercise Blood Furthermore, although the risk of developing hypoglycemiafrom exercise participation and is a concern particularly for Glucose (mg/dL) 118.9 ± 1.8 119.9 ± 2.2 116.4 ± 2.9 as the result of such participation is higher in insulin users,insulin users with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 2 Participants (n) 3,916 3,088 829 ES Change in Blood Glucose less than 4% of all individuals experienced a post-exercise (mg/dL) -32.7 ± 0.7 -35.0 ± 0.8* -23.0 ± 1.0 blood glucose level lower than 65 mg/dL.The Big Blue Test (BBT) is a program run by the Diabetes Pre-Exercise Blood GlucoseHands Foundation to raise awareness of the importance of (mg/dL) 155.2 ± 0.9 159.2 ± 1.0* 140.4 ± 1.6 SS Change in Blood Glucose Some cultural differences may be present in glycemicphysical activity in managing diabetes. This past year, in Post-Exercise Blood (mg/dL) -32.0 ± 1.4 -36.1 ± 1.7* -23.7 ± 2.4 responses to 14 minutes of physical activity and warrantaddition to encouraging people with diabetes to Glucose (mg/dL) 122.6 ± 0.8 124.0 ± 0.9* 117.4 ± 1.4 ES Hypoglycemia (<65 mg/dL) further investigation.experience the effects of varying types of physical activity Post-Exercise Events (%) 114 110* 4 Change in Blood Glucoseon their blood glucose levels, the BBT was set up to (mg/dL) -32.6 ± 0.6 -35.2 ± 0.7* -23.0 ± 1.0 (3.5%) (4.2%) (0.6%) referencescollect individuals’ results. Hypoglycemia (<65 mg/dL) SS Hypoglycemia (<65 mg/dL) 125 121* 4 Post-Exercise Events (%) 11 11* 0 1 Colberg SR, Sigal RJ, Fernhall B, Regensteiner JG, Blissmer BJ, Rubin RR, Post-Exercise (n)/(%) Chasan-Taber L, Albright AL, Braun B; American College of Sports Medicine;Our purpose was to document the glycemic effects of 14 (3.2%) (3.9%) (0.5%) (1.7%) (2.4%) (0.0%) American Diabetes Association. Exercise and type 2 diabetes: the Americanminutes (in honor of World Diabetes Day, on November College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association: joint position statement. Diabetes Care. 2010;33(12):e147-67.14) of any physical activity, along with the incidence of 2 Briscoe VJ, Tate DB and Davis SN. Type 1 diabetes: exercise andhypoglycemia related to the chosen activity, in both insulin hypoglycemia. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 32: 3: 576-582, 2007. www.bigbluetest.org p<0.05, insulin users vs. non-insulin users p<0.05, insulin users vs. non-insulin usersand non-insulin users with diabetes.