Analog Layout and Process Concern
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Analog Layout and Process Concern Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Analog Layout and Process Concern 授課教師 : 顏志仁 博士
  • 2.
    • Introduction
    • Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling
    • Modern CMOS Process
    • Analog Layout Considerations
    • SPICE Simulation
    Contents
  • 3. References
    • P. E. Allen and D. R. Holberg, “ CMOS Analog Circuit Design ”, Oxford University Press, 2002.
    • D. A. Johns and K. Martin, “ Analog Integrated Circuit Design ”, John Wiely & Sons, 1997.
    • R. Gregorian, “ Introduction to CMOS Op-Amps and Comparators ”, John Wiely & Sons, 1999.
  • 4. Analog Integrated Circuits Analog Layout and Process Concern Introduction 1 Reference : J.-T. Wu, Analog Integrated Circuits . C.–J. Yen
  • 5. Major Functions of Analog ICs
    • Provide interfaces between the analog environment of the physical world and a digital environment.
    • – amplification
    • – filtering
    • – analog-to-digital conversion
    • – digital-to-analog conversion
    • – power supply conditioning
    • Sometimes integrated with digital VLSI circuits for better performance or lower cost.
    Introduction 2 C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 6. Signals
    • An analog signal is defined over a
    • continuous range of time and a continuous
    • range of amplitudes.
    • A digital signal is defined only at discrete
    • values of time and amplitude.
    • D = b 1 2 -1 + b 2 2 -2 +b 3 2 -3 + ·····b N 2 -N =
    • An analog sampled-data signal is defined
    • over a continuous range of amplitudes but
    • only at discrete values of time.
    Introduction 3 C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 7. Bandwidths of Signals Introduction 4 C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 8. Signal Bandwidths can be Processed Introduction 5 C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 9. Digitization of a Nature Signal Introduction 6 C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 10. Symbols for MOS Transistors Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling Commonly used symbols for p-channel transistors. Commonly used symbols for n-channel transistors. 7 C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 11. Cross Section of a MOS Transistor 8 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling A cross section of a typical n-channel transistor. C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 12. N-Channel MOS Transistor (V G << 0) 9 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling V G << 0 resulting in an accumulated channel (no current flow). C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 13. N-Channel MOS Transistor (V G >> 0) 10 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling The channel is present (current flow possible from drain to source). C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 14. Dimensions of a MOS Transistor 11 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 15. Channel Charge Density 12 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 16. Pinch Off 13 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 17. I D -V DS Curve for a MOS Transistor 14 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 18. I D -V DS Curve for Different V GS 15 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 19. Weak Inversion 16 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling if and then is a characteristic current C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 20. Moderate Inversion 17 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 21. Transfer Characteristics of Temperature 18 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 22. Small-Signal Capacitances 19 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 23. Small-Signal Model in Active Region 20 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 24. MOS Transistor Equations in Active Region 21 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 25. Small-Signal Model in Triode Region 22 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 26. MOS Transistor Equations in Triode Region 23 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 27. MOS Parameters for a 0.8- μ m Technology 24 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 28. SPICE Parameters for Modeling BJTs 25 Integrated-Circuit Devices and Modeling C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 29. Simple CMOS Logic Circuits 26 Modern CMOS Process C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 30. Cross Section of the CMOS IC 27 Modern CMOS Process C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 31. SiO 2 and Si 3 N 4 28 Modern CMOS Process
    • Following initial cleaning, an SiO 2 layer is thermally grown on the silicon
    • substrate. A Si 3 N 4 layer is then deposited by LPCVD. Photoresist is spun on
    • the wafer to prepare for mask 1 operation.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 32. Mask 1 29 Modern CMOS Process
    • Mask 1 patterns the photoresist. The Si 3 N 4 layer is removed where it is not protected by
    • the photoresist by dry etching.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 33. Field Oxide 30 Modern CMOS Process
    • After photoresist stripping, the field oxide is grown in an oxidizing ambient.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 34. Mask 2 31 Modern CMOS Process
    • Photoresist is used to mask the regions where PMOS devices will be built using mask 2.
    • A boron implant provides the doping for the P wells for the NMOS devices.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 35. Mask 3 32 Modern CMOS Process
    • Photoresist is used to mask the regions where NMOS devices will be built using mask 3.
    • A phosphorus implant provides the doping for the N wells for the PMOS devices.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 36. N and P Wells 33 Modern CMOS Process
    • A high temperature drive-in completes the formation of the N and P wells.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 37. Mask 4 34 Modern CMOS Process
    • After spinning photoresist on the wafer, mask 4 is used to define the NMOS transistors.
    • A boron implant adjusts the N-channel V TH .
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 38. Mask 5 35 Modern CMOS Process
    • After spinning photoresist on the wafer, mask 5 is used to define the PMOS transistors.
    • A arsenic implant adjusts the P-channel V TH .
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 39. Polysilicon Gate 36 Modern CMOS Process
    • A layer of polysilicon is deposited. Ion implantation of phosphorus follows the
    • deposition to heavily dope the poly.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 40. Mask 6 37 Modern CMOS Process
    • Photoresist is applied and mask 6 is used to define the regions where MOS gates are
    • located. The polysilicon layer is then etched using plasma etching.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 41. Mask 7 38 Modern CMOS Process
    • Mask 7 is used to cover the PMOS devices. A phosphorus implant is used to form the
    • tip or extension (LDD) regions in the NMOS devices.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 42. Mask 8 39 Modern CMOS Process
    • Mask 8 is used to cover the NMOS devices. A boron implant is used to form the tip or
    • extension (LDD) regions in the PMOS devices.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 43. Sidewall of Polysilicon 40 Modern CMOS Process
    • The deposited SiO 2 layer is etched back anisotropically, leaving sidewall spacers along
    • the edges of the polysilicon.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 44. Mask 9 41 Modern CMOS Process
    • After growing a thin “screen” oxide, photoresist is applied and mask 9 is used to protect
    • the PMOS transistors. An arsenic implant then forms the NMOS source and drain
    • regions.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 45. Mask 10 42 Modern CMOS Process
    • After applying photoresist, mask 10 is used to protect the NMOS transistors. A boron
    • implant then forms the PMOS source and drain .
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 46. Coating of Ti 43 Modern CMOS Process
    • An unmasked oxide etch removes the SiO 2 from the devices source drain regions and
    • form the top surface of the polysilicon. Titanium is deposited on the wafer surface by
    • sputtering.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 47. TiSi 2 and TiN 44 Modern CMOS Process
    • The titanium is reacted in an N 2 ambient, forming TiSi 2 where it contacts silicon or
    • polysilicon (black regions in the figure) and TiN elsewhere.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 48. Mask 11 45 Modern CMOS Process
    • Photoresist is applied and mask 11 is used to define the regions where TiN local
    • interconnects will be used. The TiN is then etched.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 49. SiO 2 Deposited and Planarized 46 Modern CMOS Process
    • After stripping the photoresist, a conformal SiO 2 layer is deposited by LPCVD.
    • Chemical-Mechanical Polishing (CMP) or resist etchback is used to polish or etchback
    • the deposited SiO 2 layer. This planarizes the wafer surface.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 50. Mask 12 47 Modern CMOS Process
    • Photoresist is spun onto the wafer. Mask 12 is used to define the contact holes. The
    • deposited SiO 2 layer is then etched to allow connections to the silicon, polysilicon
    • and local interconnect regions.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 51. TiN/W Deposited and Planarized 48 Modern CMOS Process
    • A thin TiN layer is deposited on the wafer by sputtering, followed by deposition of a W
    • layer by CVD. CMP is used to polish back the W and TiN layer, leaving a planar
    • surface on which the first level metal can be deposited.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 52. Mask 13 49 Modern CMOS Process
    • Aluminum is deposited on the wafer by sputtering. Photoresist is spun on the wafer and
    • mask 13 is used to define the first level of metal. The Al is then plasma etched.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 53. Masks 14/15/16 50 Modern CMOS Process
    • The steps to form the second level of Al interconnect follow those in 1-55 to 1-58.
    • Mask 14 is used to define via holes between metal 1 and metal 2. Mask 15 is used to
    • define metal 2. The last step in the process is deposition of a final passivation layer,
    • usually Si 3 N 4 deposited by PECVD. The last mask 16 is used to open holes in this mask
    • over the bonding pad.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 54. MOS Transistor 51 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 55. Parallel Transistors 52 Analog Layout Considerations
    • Node 1 should be connected to
    • the more critical node.
    • To minimize voltage drops due
    • to silicon-junction resistivity.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 56. Weight Current Cell Layout 53 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 57. Current Mirror Layout Technique (I) 54 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 58. Current Mirror Layout Technique (II) 55 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 59. Current Mirror Layout Technique (III) 56 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 60. Current Mirror Layout Technique (IV) 57 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 61. Current Mirror Layout Technique (V) 58 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 62. Serious-Connected Transistors 59 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 63. CMOS Inverter 60 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 64. Input Transistors 61 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 65. Cross-Coupled Transistors 62 Analog Layout Considerations
    • Offsets can be minimized.
    • Minimum bends and corners in
    • transistors to be matched.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 66. Common-Centroid Layout 63 Analog Layout Considerations
    • Reducing errors caused by gradient effects.
    • Dummy fingers are used for better matching accuracy.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 67. Input Stages of Op-Amp 64 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 68. Layout Floor Plan for a Two-Stage Op-Amp 65 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 69. Integrated Resistor 66 Analog Layout Considerations
    • The contact contributes 0.14
    • squares.
    • Each bend contributes 2.11
    • squares.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 70. Accurate Resistor Ratios 67 Analog Layout Considerations
    • Reducing errors caused by R1/R2 contact impedance.
    • Matching boundary conditions with dummy fingers.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 71. Resistor Matching 68 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 72. Resistor Layout Technique (I) 69 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 73. Resistor Layout Technique (II) 70 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 74. Resistor Layout Technique (III) 71 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 75. Resistor Layout Technique (IV) 72 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 76. R-string Layout (I) 73 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 77. R-string Layout (II) 74 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 78. Integrated Capacitor (I) 75 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 79. Integrated Capacitor (II) 76 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 80. Capacitor Array (I) 77 Analog Layout Considerations
    • Boundary-condition matching.
    • The top plate should be connect to critical nodes.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 81. Capacitor Array (II) 78 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 82. Capacitor Array (III) 79 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 83. BJT Layout (I) 80 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 84. BJT Layout (II) 81 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 85. Shielding 82 Analog Layout Considerations
    • To keep noise from being coupled into and out of the substrate.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 86. Signal Line Shielding 83 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 87. Guard Rings 84 Analog Layout Considerations
    • Minimizing the injection of noise into the substrate.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 88. Decoupling 85 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 89. Separate Power Supplies 86 Analog Layout Considerations
    • Preventing the digital noise coupling.
    • To minimize substrate noise.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 90. Layout of a Two-Stage Op-Amp 87 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 91. Layout of a Cascode Op-Amp 88 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 92. Layout Floor Plan for Switched-Capacitor Circuits 89 Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 93. Latch-Up 90 Analog Layout Considerations
    • The equivalent circuit of the parasitic bipolar transistors.
    • The voltages after latch-up has occurred.
    C.–J. Yen Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 94. Critical Layout Issues
    • RC Delay
    • Signal coupling
    • Device matching
    • Parasitic capacitance
    • Noise considerations
    • Latch-up
    Analog Layout Considerations C.–J. Yen 91 Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 95. SPICE Simulation Simulation of a Common-Source Gain Stage C.–J. Yen 92 Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 96. SPICE Simulation Simulation of the Common-Source Gain Stage with a Capacitive Load C.–J. Yen 93 Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 97. SPICE Simulation Simulation of a Source Follower C.–J. Yen 94 Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 98. SPICE Simulation Step Response of a Source Follower C.–J. Yen 95 Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 99. SPICE Simulation Simulation of the Source Follower with a Compensation Circuit C.–J. Yen 96 Analog Layout and Process Concern
  • 100. SPICE Simulation Simulation of the Cascode Gain Stage C.–J. Yen 97 Analog Layout and Process Concern