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A look at how Neoclassical works serve different expressions ofRevolutionVIVA LAREVOLUCION!
American RevolutionRevolt against what areconsidered tyrranical BritishforcesRevolt for AmericanIndependenceAmerican expre...
Jefferson’sMonticello, Charlottesville, Virginia                               Based on pagan                            ...
Ancient Influence                    Pantheon, Rome, Italy
Houdon’s George Washington, 1788 Stands in  Contrapposto but is in contemporary wardrobe   Classical themes    support c...
Women’s RevolutionCall for women to beincluded in the equalityof humankindCall for participation inthe political processWi...
 Emphasizes REASON in  allowing women access to  the political process
SuffragettesElizabeth Cady Stanton
French RevolutionA bourgeoisierevolt againstan oppressiveand corruptmonarchy andits supportivearistocracy Women’s March on...
Kauffmann’s Cornelia Pointing to Her Childrenas Her Treasures, 1785                             An image of the          ...
David’s Oath of the Horatii, 1785The message is oneof self-sacrificerather than self-indulgenceA call to arms 4years befor...
THESE REVOLUTIONS ARE OFCOURSE GIRDED BY THEENLIGHTENMENT ANDSCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION
Scientific RevolutionDepends on detailed observation(influenced by optics discoveries of theBaroque age)Diderot’s Encyclop...
Isaac Newton               Father of Newtonian Physics               Emphasizes Empiricism               Develops Theory o...
Wright’s, An Experiment on a Bird inthe Air-Pump, 1768                        In order to popularize                      ...
EMANCIPATION   “Revolution”Enlightenment principles ofequality and freedom lead to thecall to emancipate black slavesthrou...
The Point is: Neoclassical works react against the  excessiveness of the Rococo period, a  period in which the split betw...
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Revolution!!

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  • Hyperlinkhttp://quod.lib.umich.edu/d/did/
  • Artist:William Hackwood for Josiah WedgwoodTitle:“Am I not a Man and a Brother?”Medium: Black and white jasperwareSize: 1⅜ X 1⅜" (3.5 X 3.5 cm)Date:1787Source/ Museum: Trustees of the Wedgwood Museum, Barlaston, Staffordshire, EnglandArtist:Anne-Louis Girodet-TriosonTitle: Portrait of Jean-BaptisteBelleyMedium: Oil on canvasSize: 5'2½" X 3'8½" (1.59 X 1.13 m)Date:1797Source/ Museum: Musée National du Château de Versailles
  • Transcript of "Revolution!!"

    1. 1. A look at how Neoclassical works serve different expressions ofRevolutionVIVA LAREVOLUCION!
    2. 2. American RevolutionRevolt against what areconsidered tyrranical BritishforcesRevolt for AmericanIndependenceAmerican expression of theEnlightenment will reject the“inherent” power of Royal andaristocratic authorityJefferson, inspired by the FrenchPhilosophes, uses Reason toargue for freedom
    3. 3. Jefferson’sMonticello, Charlottesville, Virginia  Based on pagan temple design  Pediment  Hemispherical dome  Columns  portico
    4. 4. Ancient Influence Pantheon, Rome, Italy
    5. 5. Houdon’s George Washington, 1788 Stands in Contrapposto but is in contemporary wardrobe  Classical themes support current causes Refers to Roman symbols of authority
    6. 6. Women’s RevolutionCall for women to beincluded in the equalityof humankindCall for participation inthe political processWill lead to thesuffragette movement inthe 19th century
    7. 7.  Emphasizes REASON in allowing women access to the political process
    8. 8. SuffragettesElizabeth Cady Stanton
    9. 9. French RevolutionA bourgeoisierevolt againstan oppressiveand corruptmonarchy andits supportivearistocracy Women’s March onVersailles, 5-6 October 1789
    10. 10. Kauffmann’s Cornelia Pointing to Her Childrenas Her Treasures, 1785  An image of the revolutionary mother, one who is willing to sacrifice her sons for the cause
    11. 11. David’s Oath of the Horatii, 1785The message is oneof self-sacrificerather than self-indulgenceA call to arms 4years before theRevolution
    12. 12. THESE REVOLUTIONS ARE OFCOURSE GIRDED BY THEENLIGHTENMENT ANDSCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION
    13. 13. Scientific RevolutionDepends on detailed observation(influenced by optics discoveries of theBaroque age)Diderot’s Encyclopédie is theclassification of “all” humanknowledge (in 28 volumes)Reveals an optimistic belief inmankind—that he can knoweverything and list itInfluenced by Carolus Linnaeus,who established the classificationsystem in biology Denis Diderot’s Encyclopédie Title Page
    14. 14. Isaac Newton Father of Newtonian Physics Emphasizes Empiricism Develops Theory of Gravity
    15. 15. Wright’s, An Experiment on a Bird inthe Air-Pump, 1768 In order to popularize science, artists will show scenes of the Scientific Revolution in dramatic and entertaining way Dramatic lighting influenced by the Baroque period. Message is that Science brings light into a world of political and social darkeness
    16. 16. EMANCIPATION “Revolution”Enlightenment principles ofequality and freedom lead to thecall to emancipate black slavesthroughout the Western World Portrait of Jean-Baptiste Belley, an emancipated Haitian slave who led the legislative campaign in France to abolish Wedgwood supported the idea of slavery and grant black people full citizenship gradual emancipation of slaves in the colonies
    17. 17. The Point is: Neoclassical works react against the excessiveness of the Rococo period, a period in which the split between the poor and wealthy brought about the need for Revolution Neoclassical works use Greco-Roman themes and figures to reveal a contemporary message of freedom, equality, and reason
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