Gothic art overview

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Gothic art overview

  1. 1. Gothic Art Age of the Cathedral
  2. 2. DISCLAIMERThis presentation is an overview of the material in your text. It is notcomprehensive, nor is it meant to be. This presentation allows you to introduceyourself to concepts and images in the respective chapter. Best practice saysto view this presentation with your book open, as many of the images in thispresentation are small or incomplete.
  3. 3. Guiding Questions• Now that the momentum ofpilgrimage has modifiedchurches and made thosechurches very, very wealthy,how will the church spend itsmoney?• As we move closer to theRenaissance period of the 15thcentury (a period that willprivilege Greco-Roman styles),what must be left behind inChristian art? Narrative?Flatness? An anti-classicalperspective?
  4. 4. Guiding HistoricalEvents• Saint Denis is built in over a 54 years (1140—1194) and established the Gothic style• The 13thcentury sees burgeoning universitysystems, including in Paris, where religiousindoctrination meets scholarly endeavor. Greco-Roman texts are now translated by Christianwriters.• The end of the Gothic period sees more andmore secular architecture rivaling the prestigeand grandness of Gothic churchesSelf Study:Throughout Christian history we have seen many images ofMary. How is this Gothic Mary different? How might she bemore of a comfort to pilgrims than images of Mary we haveseen in the Byzantine period?
  5. 5. Characteristics of Gothic ArchitectureLeft: ReimsCathedral,Reims, Franceand Right:Notre Dame,Paris, FranceA.LancetsB.Recessed PortalsC.PinnaclesD.Rose WindowE.Jamb StatuaryF. Ogival Arch (pointedarch)G.Flying ButtressThe goal of the Gothicbuilder is to 1) ornamentthe structure in order toglorify the prestige of thecommunity and 2)dissolve, puncture thesolid mass of the churchwall. The followingelements are used to dojust that:The overalleffect is ofeffortlessstrength, ofa buoyantlightnessnot normallyassociatedwith stonearchitecture. --Fred S.Kleiner
  6. 6. Gothic Architecture Outside of FranceLeft: SalisburyCathedral, England,Top Right: Gloucester,Cathedral, England,Bottom Right:Westminster Abbey,London, EnglandGothicArchitecture inFranceemphasizes thevertically ofChristianworship--transcendence.Gothicarchitectureoutside of Franceemphasizeshorizontality.Note the stonecolor changes inboth Salisbury andGloucester. Theylead your eyealong horizontallines. Also, inEngland, the goalis to disguiserather thandissolve the walls.Notice the organic"blooming" of thechoir vault atWestminsterAbbey.
  7. 7. Rose Window at Chartres Cathedral, Chartres, FranceStained glass furtherdissolves the wall ANDcreates an otherworldlylight in the church interior.This creates a kinestheticworship experience forbelievers.Stained glass, however, ismore than ornament in asacred space. It canconnect the royal powerto religious power, as inthe example to the left.With Mary, Mother ofGod, at the center asQueen of Heavensupported by the lineageof Old Testament queensand Kings, queenBlanche of Castile canjustify her own royalpower through religiousiconography.
  8. 8. In subsequent presentations, you willexplore:• The Cathedral of Notre Dame at Chartres• The Art of Stained Glass• http://youtu.be/vAtQB9wLkUA

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