Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
AIA Urban Design Workshop Briefing Materials
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

AIA Urban Design Workshop Briefing Materials

  • 159 views
Published

 

Published in Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
159
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 2012 AIA TENNESSEE ANNUAL CONVENTION & EXPO URBAN DESIGN WORKSHOP
  • 2. URBAN DESIGN WORKSHOPBRIEFING MATERIALSWhile our city has undergone a remarkable renaissance, there are still someneighborhoods that have been forgotten along the way. East Chattanooga is one ofthese places. This is a period of great change in our city, but the fact remains thatChattanooga will always be a place where neighborhoods matter.Diverse teams of talented individuals ranging from artists to city councilmen areworking to develop a revitalized creative district amidst the 1920’s ‘Main Street’architecture on historic Glass Street, in the heart of East Chattanooga.Glass House Collective’s (GHC) restored storefront on Glass Street demonstratesthe potential for the District’s historic buildings to once again become the nexusof urban life in East Chattanooga. Through creative events and workshops GHCcontinues to build community participation and awareness of the District. Theorganization has recently received a $300K grant to support streetscape and façadeimprovements on Glass Street.With your help, the community hopes to gain a set of tools that can be used tomobilize local support, engage key partners to enable a well-rounded strategy, andfoster new levels of cooperation with the City.Sounds simple enough, right?But before we can plan, we need to get to know the community.Observe what’s here…and imagine what could be!
  • 3. THE AREAWHAT’S HEREI. LocationII. Focus AreaIII. History of the CommunityIV. Area Development and Investment TrendsV. Community: DemographicsVI. Previous Studies
  • 4. TOURI. LOCATIONFor 25 years, Chattanooga has focused redevelopment efforts on the downtown core,most recently on the Southside. Twelve neighborhoods in the East Chattanooga areahave grassroots leadership and a new vision for improvement. Now is the time toextend our re-development focus to this area. Direct Route Interstate Streets Historic Glass StreetVisual 1.Despite deep disinvestment since the 1960’s, East Chattanooga has been strengthenedby arterial roadways that provide a direct link from downtown to recent billion dollarinvestments (Volkswagen and Amazon), commercial developments, and suburbanneighborhoods to the northeast – making it a key node for citywide vibrancy.
  • 5. I. LOCATIONKEY Transportation Hospitals The Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum and The Debutts Yard Memorial Hospital Annex & previous site of Buster Brown Recreation Public Housing East Chattanooga Recreation Center Chattanooga Housing Authority’s Harriet Tubman Housing Historically Significant Parks Development currently slated for redevelopement (larger) & Billy Goat Hill and Sherman Reservation Maple Hills LEED-certified apartments (smaller). Greenway South Chickamauga Greenway Historic Monuments Missionary Ridge Civil War Monument Trail Education Avondale Head Start and Hardy Elementary School Commercial Corridor Historic Glass Street Commercial Corridor LEED Certified LEED Certified Fire HallVisual 2.Environmental, cultural, social, and built assets in and around East Chattanooga.
  • 6. II. FOCUS AREA: GLASS STREETCentral to the communities that make up East Chattanooga is the historic GlassStreet, a once thriving commercial corridor.Visual 3.The two-story street already features bike lanes, public transit stops, and sidewalkswith clear pedestrian orientation.
  • 7. II. FOCUS AREA: GLASS STREETVisual 4.The historic urban pattern and character sets the Glass Street commercial corridor apartfrom other parts of the city. Nowhere within a 5-mile radius from Glass Street does acombined commercial and residential opportunity exist.
  • 8. II. FOCUS AREA: GLASS STREETVisual 5.A recent vehicular count showed an average of 11,000 cars pass through Glass Streetevery day. This is comparable to the car count on Manufacturers Road in front of the OneNorth Shore development.
  • 9. II. FOCUS AREA: GLASS STREET circa 1920 2012Visual 6. and 7.The scale, rhythm, and craftsmanship of many existing buildings cannot be replicatedtoday and are valuable resources that can attract additional investment to the area.* Glass Street 3D brings the Glass Street corridor to life on Google Earth, turning a virtual2D into a three dimensional landscape with models rich in details and features.Link Glass Street 3d:http://goo.gl/GjoMp
  • 10. III. HISTORY OF THE COMMUNITYEast Chattanooga was part of the annexation by the City of Chattanooga in 1925 andcontains the northern part of the central city.Visual 8.Dating back to the 1800’s, the area has been a family farm, Civil War battlefield, and thrivingcommercial and residential community. In the 1880s, industrial developments in the areaincluded a butter dish factory, curtain pole factory, stove foundries, wheelbarrow works,sawmill, shoe factory and the hosiery mill.
  • 11. III. HISTORY OF THE COMMUNITYVisual 9.Up until the 1960’s, locally-owned businesses dominated the Glass Street commercialcorridor that served hundreds of area residents.
  • 12. IV. AREA DEVELOPMENT AND INVESTMENT TRENDS Grassroots leadership development and re-visioning programs initiated in East1999 Chattanooga. Programs were active through 2011. Partner: Community Impact cichatt.org
  • 13. Completion of the LEED2009 Certified Fire Station #4. Partner: City of Chattanooga
  • 14. 1 gigabit per second Internet available to all city residents and2010 businesses. Partner: EPB chattanoogagig.com
  • 15. Photo: Beverly Carroll Nooga.com Completion of the South2011 Chickamauga Creek Greenway. Partner: The Trust for Public Land tpl.org
  • 16. Maple Hills Apartments Photo: CHA Housing Authority Completion of our nation’s first LEED Platinum affordable housing2012 development (48 units). Partner: Chattanooga Housing Authority chahousing.org
  • 17. Memorial Hospital Photo: @FutureMemorial A $250 million dollar renovation of Memorial Hospital.2012 https://www.facebook.com/ FutureMemorial
  • 18. 2523 Glass StreetGlass House Collective’s (GHC) restored storefront on Glass Street demonstrates thepotential for the District’s historic buildings to once again become the nexus of urbanlife in East Chattanooga. Through creative events and workshops GHC continues to buildcommunity participation and awareness of the District and has recently received a$300K grant to support streetscape and façade improvements on Glass Street. Glass House Collective (GHC) renovates2012 storefront headquarters on Glass Street. glasshousecollective.org
  • 19. LAUNCH Entrepreneurship Academy Photo: GHCBusiness Entrepreneurship Academy LAUNCH’s 10-week business-planning course, continuum of job2012 training and mentoring programs are producing entrepreneurs to add retail density to Glass Street. http://www.launchchattanooga.org/
  • 20. Chattanooga Mobile Market Photo: GHC The Chattanooga Mobile Market brings affordable produce & dairy products to Glass Street.2012 Partners: YMCA, Gaining Ground, the Hamilton Cty. Health Dept. & Step ONE Program, the Chattanooga Area Food Band, the Benwood Foundation, and the Community Foundation of Greater Chattanooga
  • 21. V. COMMUNITY: DEMOGRAPHICSDemographic information helps us understand the changing marketplace, business and realestate development opportunities that are realistic and make sense for their communities.Ring: One Mile RadiusTRENDS 2011 - 2016 3.5 3Annual Rate ( in percent ) 2.5 2 1.5 1 Area State 0.5 USA 0 Populations Households Families Owner Hits Median HH IncomePOPULATION BY AGE 13 12 11 10 9 8 Percent 7 6 5 4 3 2011 2 2016 1 0 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+2011 HOUSEHOLD INCOME 2011 POPULATION BY RACE 75 70 65 <$15K 38.1% 60 $150K - $199K 0.9% 55 50 $200K 0.9% 45 Percent $100K - 149K 2.1% 40 $75K - $99K 5.5% 35 30 $50K - $74K 12.9% 25 $35K - $49K 9.9% 20 $25K - $34K 14.7% 15 10 $15K - 24K 15.0% 5 0 White Black Am. Ind. Asian Pacific Other 2+ 2011 Percent Hispanic Origin: 1.1%
  • 22. V. COMMUNITY: DEMOGRAPHICSRing: Two Mile RadiusTRENDS 2011 - 2016 3.5 3Annual Rate ( in percent ) 2.5 2 1.5 1 Area 0.5 State USA 0 Populations Households Families Owner Hits Median HH IncomePOPULATION BY AGE 13 12 11 10 9 8 Percent 7 6 5 4 3 2011 2016 2 1 0 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+2011 HOUSEHOLD INCOME 2011 POPULATION BY RACE 80 75 <$15K 32.5% 70 65 $150K - $199K 0.9% 60 $200K+ 1.0% 55 50 $100K - 149K 2.9% 45 Percent $75K - $99K 6.5% 40 $50K - $74K 13.6% 35 30 $35K - $49K 10.5% 25 $25K - $34K 14.8% 20 15 $15K - 24K 17.4% 10 5 0 White Black Am. Ind. Asian Pacific Other 2+ 2011 Percent Hispanic Origin: 1.3%
  • 23. V. COMMUNITY: DEMOGRAPHICS Ring: Three Mile Radius TRENDS 2011 - 2016 3.5 3Annual Rate ( in percent ) 2.5 - 2 1.5 1 Area 0.5 State USA 0 Populations Households Families Owner Hits Median HH Income POPULATION BY AGE 13 12 11 10 9 8 Percent 7 6 5 4 3 2011 2016 2 1 0 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ 2011 HOUSEHOLD INCOME 2011 POPULATION BY RACE 60 55 <$15K 25.3% 50 $200K+ 2.2% 45 $150K - $199K 1.8% 40 35 $100K - 149K 4.4% Percent 30 $75K - $99K 7.6% 25 $50K - $74K 15.0% 20 $35K - $49K 12.9% 15 $25K - $34K 14.1% 10 $15K - 24K 16.6% 5 0 White Black Am. Ind. Asian Pacific Other 2+ 2011 Percent Hispanic Origin: 3.4%
  • 24. VI. PREVIOUS STUDIES & PLANS: EAST CHATTANOOGA & BEYONDCOMMUNITY INPUT:Where We Stand (2010) was developed by the Ochs Center for Metropolitan Studiesat the request of Chattanooga Stand. In May of 2009, Chattanooga Stand initiated acommunity visioning effort for the Chattanooga region. Over the course of 5 months,Stand staff and volunteers collected responses from over 26,000 Chattanooga arearesidents to four open-ended questions about the future of the region. The purposeof this report is to identify the most common themes that emerged from the Standresponses and to provide supplemental information and data that relate to theidentified challenges and opportunities in the Chattanooga region.LINK: https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0X5LKESJuzvcTM4Y0FiMWpSbHM37406 Stand Survey Results (2010) was compiled by Stand to reflect the input of over500 residents from the East Chattanooga community.LINK: https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0X5LKESJuzvdllTdFZuQ3FzQ0UNEIGHBORHOOD ASSESSMENTS:The Chattanooga Neighborhood Assessment (2011) was developed by CommunityDevelopment Strategies at the request of Community Impact of Chattanooga. Theassessment focuses on thirteen neighborhoods in Chattanooga’s urban core. Thepurpose of the assessment is to provide a sense of the direction in which the subjectneighborhoods are moving, to identify key issues across all neighborhoods, and to makerecommendations about further action.LINK: https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0X5LKESJuzvVVhELVl6ZnQ0cjgCONNECTIVITY:The Chattanooga Trails and Master Greenway Plan (2009) was developed by the Trust forPublic Land and the City of Chattanooga. The Chattanooga Greenway Master Plan callsfor creating greenway trails along tributaries of the Tennessee River and connectingthem to the Riverpark, a celebrated linear park along the banks of the Tennessee River.Explore the Chattanooga Greenway Master Plan was developed by A Carroll GIS for theChattanooga, TN office of the Trust for Public Land (2009).LINK: http://www.acarroll-gis.org/TPL_Flash_Project/_swf/TPL_v1.swf
  • 25. VI. PREVIOUS STUDIES & PLANS: EAST CHATTANOOGA & BEYONDThe Chattanooga Area Regional Bicycle Facilities Master Plan was developed as partof the region’s effort to continue improving bicycle and pedestrian accommodationsin the Chattanooga area. In 2008 the Chattanooga-Hamilton County/North GeorgiaTransportation Planning Organization (TPO), the regional transportation planningorganizations in Chattanooga, Tennessee and the North Georgia area, initiated thedevelopment of a Regional Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan for the Chattanooga region.LINK: https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0X5LKESJuzvcjJ4SDJKN3hxeGsChattanooga’s City R&D project was hosted by CreateHere in partnership with GOODMagazine. Four potentially transformative ideas for the future of connectivity betweendowntown Chattanooga and Enterprise South were generated through City R&D. Two ofthese ideas consider multi-modal transportation between these centers of commerceand culture; alternatively, the other two ideas focus on innovative ways to animatespaces along the way – which includes the Glass Street commercial corridor.LINK: https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0X5LKESJuzvSU9WQVAxZjItbUkLAND USE:The East Chattanooga Area Plan (2004) was developed by the Regional PlanningAgency at the request of the Chattanooga City Council. This report details the RPA’sresponsibilities towards the community regarding plan input, sets the study boundaryand provides a guideline for the plan regarding residential and commercial growth andprotection of environmental resources.LINK: https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B0X5LKESJuzvbDBTai1adGFEVHM