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Decentralized reactive power control for distribution automation  (2)
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Decentralized reactive power control for distribution automation (2)

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    Decentralized reactive power control for distribution automation  (2) Decentralized reactive power control for distribution automation (2) Presentation Transcript

    • Ashish Bhalerao (MTECH Power system) Roll no:122060018
    • INTRODUCTION  Voltage   profile estimation RTU’s for optimal operation Simulation results
    • VOLTAGE PROFILE ESTIMATION From fig. given below The value of min. Voltage point between DG’s , if exists can be given as:
    • VOLTAGE PROFILE ESTIMATION DUE TO INJECTION OF REACTIVE POWER Change in voltage in terms of the amount of reactive power injected at the capacitor bus can be given by : The optimum reactive power injection at the capacitor bus minimizing the losses-index can be defined as:
    • PROPOSED SYSTEM STRUCTURE
    • OPTIMAL OPERATION BY FEEDER ALGORITHM End of feeder RTU 2. RTU Downstream of capacitor 3. Capacitor’s RTU 4. RTU Upstream of capacitor 5. Station RTU For general case a) Forward phase b) Backward phase 1.
    • CHANGES IN VOLTAGE PROFILE DUE TO REACTIVE POWER INJECTION
    • OPTIMAL REACTIVE POWER CONTROL  Case 1 :- Q=0 Q =20 Q = 40 Q = 65 Feeder max voltage 1.05 1.05 1.05 1.05 Feeder min voltage 1.0094 1.0130 1.0165 1.0210 L.I 0.8136 0.6847 0.5698 0.4460 10.1 8.7 7.4 6.1 Losses (KW)
    •  Case 2 :- DG-1 injects 200 KW & DG-2 injects 300 KW Q=0 Q =20 Q = 40 Q = 65 Feeder max voltage 1.05 1.0523 1.0559 1.0603 Feeder min voltage 1.0413 1.0417 1.0452 1.0425 L.I 0.370 0.356 0.0353 0.0350 Losses (KW) 14.3 10.9 11.7 10.4
    • CASE 3 :- Possible reactive power injections Maximum Voltage of feeder Minimum voltage of feeder Estimated losses index Actual losses using power flow program Q1 = 0 Q2 = 0 1.0550 1.0275 0.6823 11.6 Q1 = 0 Q2 = 40 1.0592 1.0381 0.5843 9.1 Q1 = 0 Q2 =30 1.0574 1.0355 0.6030 9.7 Q1 = 20 Q2 = 0 1.0550 1.0299 0.6764 10.7 Q1 = 20 Q2 = 40 1.0616 1.0405 0.5916 8.5 Q1 = 20 Q2 = 30 1.0598 1.0379 0.6068 8.9 Q1 = 35 Q2 = 0 1.0562 1.0316 0.6760 10.1 Q1 = 35 Q2 = 40 1.0633 1.0423 0.6017 8 Q1 = 35 Q2 =30 1.0592 1.0381 0.6142 8.4
    • VOLTAGE PROFILE OF SYSTEM WITH Q1 = 0 Q2 =40
    • CONCLUSION     Controlling switched capacitors of feeder to maintain voltage profile Formation of multi-agent system by co-ordination between DG’s and capacitor Effectiveness of proposed technique using simulation results Realization of Advanced distribution automation in smart grids as well as existing grids
    • REFERENCES        S. H. Lee and J. J. Grainger, “Optimum placement of fixed and switched capacitors on primary distribution feeders,” IEEE Trans. Power App. Syst., vol. PAS-100, no. 1, pp. 345–352, 1981. M. Chis, M. M. A. Salama, and S. Jayaram, “Capacitor placement in distribution systems using heuristic search strategies,” IEE Proc. Gener., Transm., Distrib., vol. 144, no. 3, pp. 225–230, 1997. H. N. Ng, M. M. A. Salama, and A. Y. Chikhani, “Classification of capacitor allocation techniques”