Smart Sustainable City: Digital City + Green City + Intelligent City

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Intelligent Territories
Future Community
Sustainable City
Smart City
Green City
Intelligent City
Innovation City
Intelligent City Platform
Smart Computing
Information and Communications Technology
Future Internet
Urban Planning, City Planning
Intelligent Urban Design
Building New Cities
Smart Urban Renewal

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  • SEE SUSTAINABLE CITIES AT THE SCALE OF WHOLE COUNTRY:
    The Nation's and/or President's Challenge to creating the Intelligent State:
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-nations-global-initiative
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/sustainable-nations-global-initiative
    Push your national government to follow the Initiative...
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Also See the EIS SMART CITIES GLOBAL INITIATIVE:
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-city-commitment
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-cities-global-initiative
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-city-global-initiative
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  • A new approach is needed for cities to respond to globalization, urbanization, environmental and economic challenges in a timely way
    • Cities need to rethink their strategies and adopt a fully integrated approach to successfully plan, develop and deploy intelligent and sustainable solutions
    • This approach should drive behavioral change to maximize adoption of new concepts and technologies that will end up improving cities’ sustainability and operational efficiency
    • The ‘intelligence’ lets us have the best integrated solutions for cities
    Intelligent City – An attractive economic, social, cultural and technological environment in which citizens, companies and government sustainably live, work and interact
    Intelligent
    regulatory and
    policy frameworks
    Intelligent
    financial and tax incentives
    Intelligent infostructure
    Intelligent infrastructure
    Part of Smart Cities Global Initiative, the “Smart City “X” Program aims to transform any city as an intelligent eco city: environmentally sustainable, inter-connected, instrumented, innovative, and integrated, regionally and globally attractive for businesses, citizens, visitors and investors.
    SMART CITY “X” is to be managed by its urban brains, an intelligent city cloud platform, managing its resources, assets, processes and systems: Urban Land and Environment, Roads and Transportation, Energy networks and Utilities, ICT networks and fiber telecom infrastructure, Public and residential buildings, Natural Resources, Water and Waste management, Social infrastructure, Health and safety, Education and culture, Public administration and services, Communities and Businesses.
  • SUPPLEMENT: Who are Violating Smart Sustainable Cities™ IP Copyrights
    Schweiker, Marit, Aims and Goals of Smart Sustainable City Management - Putting Quality of Citizens' Lifes First, Council of European Municipalities and Regions, 5 Oct. 2010. Web. Last accessed 12 Feb. 2014. http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/conferences/od2010/file-upload/2010/docs/39-05A34-Presentation_OD_Smart_Cities_CEMR.pdf
    The Partnership for Smart and Sustainable Cities, http://www.urbanknowledge.org/smartsustainablecities.html
    FGSSC (2014). Smart sustainable cities – an analysis of definitions. Focus Group on Smart Sustainable Cities Working Group 1, International Telecommunications Union (ITU). http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/focusgroups/ssc/
    Hitachi, Smart Sustainable City Overview, Smart Cities: Hitachi, Hitachi, Web. Last accessed 9 Feb. 2014. http://www.hitachi.com/products/smartcity/vision/concept/overview.html
    Aoun, Charbel, The Smart Sustainable City Cornerstone: Urban Efficiency, Schneider Electric, Web. Last accessed 9 Feb. 2014. http://www2.schneider-electric.com/documents/support/white-papers/smart-cities/998-1185469_smart-city-cornerstone-urban-efficiency.pdf
    Telefónica, What Is a Smart Sustainable City? Telefónica, Web. Last accessed 9 Feb. 2014. http://smartcity-telefonica.com/?p=373
    Huawei, Brilliant Life Powered by Smart Sustainable City, Huawei Ltd, Web. Last accessed 9 Feb. 2014. http://www.huawei.com/en/about-huawei/publications/communicate/hw-079367.htm
    Current Activities For Smart Sustainable Cities, Japan Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications (MIC) Smart Town, Contribution No. FG-SSC-0033, ITU Focus Group on Smart Sustainable Cities, Madrid, September 2013. Web. Last accessed 14 Feb 2014. http://ifa.itu.int/t/fg/ssc/docs/1309-Madrid/in/fg-ssc-0033-japan.doc
    Homeier, Ina, Smart Sustainable City Wien Initiative, City of Vienna, May 2013. Web. Last accessed 12 Feb. 2014. http://www.impacts.org/euroconference/vienna2013/presentations/Vienna%20impacts%20smart%20city.pdf
    Comstock, Maggie, What Is a Smart Sustainable City and How Can a City Boost Its IQ? World Bank Blogs – Sustainable Cities, 02 April 2012. Web. Last accessed 12 Feb. 2014. http://blogs.worldbank.org/sustainablecities/what-is-a-smart-city-and-how-can-a-city-boost-its-iq
    Smart Sustainable City, Business Dictionary, Web. Last accessed 13 Feb. 2014. http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/smart-city.html
    Smart Sustainable Cities & Smart Statistics, Government of Italy, Contribution No. FG-SSC-0014, ITU Focus Group on Smart Sustainable Cities, Turin, May 2013. Web. Last accessed 14 Feb 2014. http://ifa.itu.int/t/fg/ssc/docs/1305-Turin/in/fg-ssc-0014-Italy.zip
    Washburn, Doug, and Sindhu, Usman, Helping CIOs Understand "Smart Sustainable City" Initiatives, FORRESTER. Last Accessed 12 Feb. 2014. http://public.dhe.ibm.com/partnerworld/pub/smb/smarterplanet/forr_help_cios_und_smart_city_initiatives.pdf
    Innovative Future of Russia's Cities, Center for Smart Sustainable City Innovation – Ernst & Young, Web. Last accessed 13 Feb. 2014. http://www.ey.com/RU/en/Services/Specialty-Services/Smart-City-Innovation-Center
    Woods, Eric, and Gartner, John, Smart Sustainable City Suppliers, Navigant Research, 2013. Web. Last accessed 13 Feb. 2014. http://www.navigantresearch.com/wp-assets/uploads/2013/07/LB-SCITS-13-Executive-Summary.pdf
    Toppeta, Donato, The Smart Sustainable City Vision: How Innovation and ICT Can Build Smart, "liveable", Sustainable Cities, Think Innovation, Oct. 2010. Web. Last accessed 13 Feb. 2014. http://www.thinkinnovation.org/en/portfol/the-smart-city-vision-how-innovation-and-ict-can-build-smart-liveable-sustainable-cities-2-2/
    Definition of Smart Cities – China Communications Standards Association (CCSA), Smart Sustainable City: terminologies and definitions, 2013, http://www.ccsa.org.cn/workstation/project_disp.php?auto_id=4336 (in Chinese)
    Kramers, A., Hojer, M., Lovehagen, N., Wangel, J., Smart Sustainable Cities-Exploring ICT Solutions for reduced energy use in cities, Environmental Modelling and Software, Issue 56. January 2014. pp. 52-62
     
  • AND WHAT IS NOT A SMART CITY
    The study, Mapping Smart Cities in EU, is a good sample of what is not a smart city and how it shouldn’t be developed.
    http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/etudes/join/2014/507480/IPOL-ITRE_ET%282014%29507480_EN.pdf
    A Smart City is NOT one with at least one initiative addressing one or more of the following six characteristics: Smart Governance, Smart People, Smart Living, Smart Mobility, Smart Economy and Smart Environment.‘A Smart City is NOT city seeking to address public issues via ICT-based solutions on the basis of a multi-stakeholder, municipally based partnership’.
    A Smart City is NOT just about “the use of smart computing technologies to make the critical infrastructure components and services of a city – which include city administration, education, healthcare, public safety, real estate, transportation and utilities – more intelligent, interconnected and efficient.”
  • The evolution of sustainable urban planning is reflected in its lexical multiplicity and generalization: spatial planning, land-use planning, physical planning, city planning, town (and regional) planning, and development planning; urbanisme and urbanization, or development planning, master plan, comprehensive city plan and detailed plan; strategic and integrated activity
    of government, or urban (public) management, and environmental planning/management, including both the natural and built environment.
    The traditional forms of urban planning are not only inappropriate for addressing the new challenges, as rapid urbanization, climate change, resource shortages and energy costs, traffic congestion and pollution, urban poverty and poor housing or aging infrastructures, but in some circumstances may be directly contributing to the exacerbation of urban life, its poverty, safety and security, social exclusion and spatial marginalization.
    There are several key characteristics of the Smart City Planning System as distinguished from the standard urban planning systems.
    First, introducing the concept of smart and sustainable growth into urban planning, design and management allows to manage the process of urbanization through integrated development planning, effective land-use planning, mobilization of resources and capacity-building (in urban land, urban environment, municipal finance, urban infrastructure and urban poverty): making land and infrastructure available for low-income housing in healthy and safe locations, while providing education, healthcare, employment, community financing and other social services within the areas.
    Second, smart urban planning is no more a technical exercise in the physical planning and design of human settlements, with environmental, technological, social, economic or political matters lying outside the scope of planning: http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-cities-27402134
    The Smart City planning is no more just a formal activity to be carried out by trained experts with relatively little involvement of civic society, local authorities, businesses, politicians or communities.
    Third, the Smart City Planning is about producing comprehensive city development plans covering urban master plans, or blueprint plans, portraying ideal visions of the future, and layout plans and local plans, showing a detailed view of the built form of a city in its ideal end-state.
    It is underpinned by directive plans and strategic plans and implemented by the primary legal tool of the land-use zoning schemes.
    Fourth, there must be a close alignment and synergy between smart city development plans and strategic spatial plans and the system of land laws and land-use management, with an effective mechanism for this linkage.
    The Smart City Development Plan provides guidance for specific urban projects, which in the context of developed Europe are to be strategically integrated ‘brownfield’ urban regeneration projects,
    developing Russia, India or China, brand new smart and green infrastructural projects.
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/urban-europe
    In all, the Smart City Development Plan sets out future spatial and functional patterns and economic, social and ecological relationships for transformation cities, emerging as sustainable innovation ecosystems of interrelated urban systems, technological systems, social systems, economic systems and government systems.
    As far as the smart city market is projected to exceed $ 1 trillion by 2016, it’s the trillion dollar question: who is to develop our smart cities: big architectural and engineering firms practicing standard urban planning with some innovations, or big technology businesses pushing for the adoption by cities and states their corporate technologies and services?
    As a guiding example, Townsend in his recent book, “Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia”, views the push towards smart cities as being led by the wrong people – technology companies with naïve visions and short term commercial goals; while the architects, planners and scientists… often struggle to share their specific knowledge.
    The Global Report on Human Settlements (Planning Sustainable Cities) central argument is still valid: urban planning systems have changed very little being often contributors to urban problems, and that a new role for urban planning has to be found to realize the goal of sustainable urbanization of liveable, productive and inclusive cities, towns and villages.
    The High Level Group of the European Innovation Partnership for Smart Cities and Communities has today adopted the Partnership's 'Strategic Implementation Plan' (SIP). The plan will serve as the basis for speeding up the deployment of Smart City solutions in Europe. A facilitator for any city becoming smart and developing innovative services in this sense is if they can rely on fast, reliable and secure networks that ensure high quality connectivity.
    The SIP is drafted by - and based on a thorough consultation of - a great variety of actors from industry, cities, civil society and research. It focuses on three specific areas:
    sustainable districts,
    sustainable urban mobility,
    and integrated infrastructures across energy, ICT and transport.
    It proposes a variety of actions to drive forward improvements in these areas. These include a common set of Smart City standards, "open data by default", new ways of designing planning solutions, the creation of "innovation zones", new business models and improving collaborative governance mechanisms dedicated to integrated city planning and management.
    Successful programmes require that the public and private sector work closely together, at local, national and EU level. The SIP is the first result of such cooperation, and now the challenge comes to developing real projects that deliver real improvements to our citizens.
    Such projects require mutual commitments:
    To kick-start projects, the Commission intends to support large, integrated, interdisciplinary and highly visible "Lighthouse Projects" through Horizon2020 funds, with the aim to develop common successful solutions that can be replicated in a large number of cities. In the mid-term, the roll out of successful solutions will be facilitated further across Europe also through regional funds. In addition, the Commission will invest (in cooperation with other organisations) in activities to promote the exchange of know-how and build capacities concerning Smart City activities. The Commission will also ensure that this is linked with on-going and future work to improve framework conditions, for example in regulation, in standardisation and in evaluation/ progress monitoring.
    All members of the High Level Group commit to develop and use open standards and common data formats for technologies deployed in such Smart City solutions, and to ensure interoperability across systems. All members equally commit to making relevant data accessible also to third parties, whilst fully respecting consumer privacy and protecting their legitimate business interests, and to providing integrated policy approaches across the three sectors to their stakeholders.
    Any city, company, association, government or research body is invited to join the commitments of the High Level Group.
    The European Innovation Partnership will launch an open call for "Smart City and Community Commitments" in early 2014, which should lead to the deployment of smart city solutions that achieve a triple bottom line gain for Europe:
    better quality of life for our citizens,
    more competitive industry and SMEs,
    more sustainable energy, transport and ICT systems and infrastructures.
  • Here is a list if Sustainable Urban Development Goals in the order of increasing concern, each smart urban renewal should consider:
    Beyond GDP
    Tourism
    Community culture and spirituality
    Corporate social responsibility
    Information and communications technology
    Forests
    Land management
    Good governance
    Green economy
    Peace and security
    Transport and infrastructure
    Waste management
    Desertification
    Equity
    Biodiversity
    Disaster risk reduction
    Oceans and seas
    Economy and macroeconomic stability
    Housing
    Sustainable consumption and production
    Gender
    Employment
    Environment/management of natural resources
    Climate change
    Means of implementation
    Health
    Poverty eradication
    Education
    Energy
    Water and sanitation
    Food security and sustainable agriculture
    UN General Assembly. A/67/634
  • The total Smart cities market is expected to reach more than $1 trillion by 2016, at a CAGR of 14.2% (“Smart Cities Market (2011 – 2016) – Projects, Advanced Technologies, Adoptions and Transformations Worldwide Market Report”).
    As an example of nationwide initiative, following the mega trend of smart global urbanization, the UK Government organized the Smart Cities Forum coordinated by Technology Strategy Board, with very useful initiative of the Future Cities Demonstrator competition, deserving to view as a good practice to start nation-wide:
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-britain
    The smart city competition was held as a two-stage process: cities were invited to bid for funding to carry out a feasibility study and develop their Demonstrator project proposal, identifying key themes in the challenges faced by the cities, and their visions for future development, to identify their visions for future development and common areas for collaboration between the cities.
    Over 50 cities submitted proposals for feasibility studies, of which 30 councils were awarded grants of £50,000.
    https://connect.innovateuk.org/web/future-cities-special-interest-group/feasibility-studies
    The key themes identified as: Quality of life; Economic development; Community engagement and integration; Sustainability, economic, social, technological and ecological.
    Cities have identified a range of existing resources and opportunities to develop their future cities visions, including: Governance and senior leadership; Existing partnerships; New development; Existing infrastructure and industry; Forward funding.
    All the proposed projects are to follow one multi-layered architectural framework: Organisation Layer (from citizens to academia); Infrastructure Layer (from Wi-Fi network to Heat Networks and Urban Spaces); Platform Layer (from virtual web to home interfaces); Application Layer (from energy to waste). The integration of city systems in terms of organisation, infrastructure, platforms and applications was a precondition of future cities proposals.
  • Today, 80 % of the Europeans live in urban areas. Cities occupy only about 2% of the land area, but they consume 75 % of resources and emit 80 % CO2. It is most critical to find new innovative ways to reduce the consumption and the pollution, optimizing the flow of resources, energy, information, traffic, goods, services and financing
    to drive sustainable economic development, resilience, and high quality of life; these flows and interactions become smart through making strategic use of information and communication infrastructure and services in a process of transparent urban planning and management that is responsive to the social and economic needs of society.
    http://ec.europa.eu/energy/technology/initiatives/smart_cities_en.htm
    http://www.eu-smartcities.eu/blog/what-exactly-are-smart-cities-and-communities-towards-eip-conference
    The i-City Platform is to collect data from smart devices and sensors embedded in its streets and roadways, power and water grids, buildings and other city assets, sharing data via smart communications networks, wired, wireless and mobile, using smart software  for delivering intelligent information and smart innovative services: digital citizens, smart politics, smart health, smart education, smart home, smart utilities (water, energy, waste, transportation, information), smart safety and security, online taxes and permits, utility bills, payments, GIS information on underground cables, pipes, water mains, bus arrival, traffic maps, crime reports, emergency warnings, cultural events, etc.
  • Redeveloped as a Smart and Sustainable City, a City “X” is to emerge as an Intelligent City of the Future of three critical urban levels planned, managed and coordinated as integral multi-projects:
    Digital/ICT/Hi-Tech/Ubiquitous/Cyber/Mobile/Interconnected/Smart City (Districts, Municipalities, Communities)
    (Digital/Information Capital; Intelligent ICT Infrastructure, Multi-Play Telecom Networks, Smart Governance, Intelligent Management Platforms, Ubiquitous Computation, Internet of Things (M2M Technology), Network-integrated Buildings, Digital Communities, Digital/Virtual Lifestyle)
    Sustainable/Ecological/Green/Zero-Carbon/Zero-Waste/Zero-Energy/Nature Friendly/Eco City (Districts, Municipalities, Communities) (Natural Capital; Natural Resources, Physical Capital, Green Energy Networks, Green Buildings, Eco-Environment, Eco Communities, Green Lifestyle)
    Knowledge/Learning/Innovation/ Intelligent/Science/Intellectual/LivingLab/Creative/Human/Inclusive/Social City (Districts, Municipalities, Communities) (Knowledge or Innovation Capital; Human/Intellectual Capital, Social Capital and Networks, Social Cohesion, Inclusion, Knowledge Triangles/Health Triangles, Knowledge EcoSystems, Knowledge Communities, Intelligent/Smart Lifestyle)
    The goal of the Smart City “X” Strategy is to enhance urban wealth, performance and competitiveness, advancing smart innovation and creativity, education, art and medicine, science and technology, industry and commerce, transportation and mobility, social communications and public administration and environment conservation.
    In all, Sustainable City “X” is to be renewed as a cyber-physical territorial ecosystem with interdependent urban systems: sustainable land and environment, smart people, interconnected info- and infrastructure and intelligent government.
    SMART TERRITORIES OF THE FUTURE: The EU Smart Communities and Cities Prototype: 3.0 City, from Dumb to Intelligent Cities. http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/30-cityeu-prototype
  • Its i-City Platform is to collect big data from intelligent instrumentation, smart devices and sensors embedded in its streets and roadways, power and water grids, buildings and other city assets, interconnected via smart communications networks, wired, wireless and mobile, using smart software  for delivering intelligent information and smart innovative services: digital citizens, smart politics, smart health, smart education, smart home, smart utilities (water, energy, waste, transportation, information), smart safety and security, online taxes and permits, utility bills, payments, GIS information on underground cables, pipes, water mains, bus arrival, traffic maps, crime reports, emergency warnings, cultural events, etc.:
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-limassol
  • Developing a sustainable city strategy is the hardest, yet most essential element in becoming a smarter city.
    “…developing a city strategy is both the hardest and most essential step to becoming a smarter city. This strategy will help determine where and when to invest, will articulate key milestones and returns on investment and can help define an integration/optimization calendar across all systems.”
    A case of Smart Barcelona, aiming to become a global reference model for sustainable urban development, realizing the smart city
    master plan using an expensive and unsystematic bottom-up approach, as many other cities, like Amsterdam.
    In 2009 Barcelona City Council presented its "Smart City" model to improve its residents' quality of life and ensure a more efficient and sustainable future. This strategic positioning is in balance with the city’s modern urban planning. The initiative aims to achieve Barcelona’s 2020 vision of becoming a global reference model for sustainable urban development. These aims responds to future challenges, since the city is facing an urban wave and may be beginning to show lag-time between its dazzling, international image and socio-economic change. Furthermore, development saturation is creating problems of increasingly difficult accessibility within the city.
    The Barcelona metropolitan area’s population is 4,200,000 on an area of 803 km2, with a GDP amounting to 177 billion , that is equivalent to €35,975 in per
    capita terms. Barcelona has developed the world’s leading districts in tourism, finance, culture and high technology. Modern transport infrastructures provide easy access within the
    city connecting Barcelona internationally through the airport (30 million passengers), a principal Mediterranean port and a high speed rail network. Barcelona is now facing an urban
    wave, which is creating problems of increasingly difficult accessibility within the city.
    Open integrated Barcelona: Barcelona intends to integrate all the information generated by its services into a single Urban Platform in alliance with Cisco, through which it aims to
    achieve greater efficiency in information processing. The data of these services are currently gathered by sensors using different kinds of technology that do not communicate with one
    another. The city aim is to develop an urban operating system that integrates all the city's processing technologies into an interconnected network of information, which is generated by
    services such as mobility, safety, smart grids and transport. The Urban Platform Reference Architecture can be connected across eight pilot projects: transportation, real estate, safety and security, utilities, learning, health, sports and entertainment, and government. Initial estimates from Cisco and Barcelona City Council suggest that the initiative has the potential to reduce the capital costs of telecommunications by up to 30 percent, with simultaneous operational savings of as much as 20-30 percent. In addition, it could reduce by as much as 25 percent the costs associated with introducing new city services as well as opening up new revenue channels for the city.
    Advanced integration services are offered thanks to Europe's future Galileo satellite geopositioning system. Location based service based on Open Data to find the closest public
    bicycle stations, consult availability and location, station visualization in a map, interactive browsing through all the city and direct access to preferred stations.
    The Smart City Strategic Implementation Planning is to cover the SIP of the EIP on Smart Cities and Communities:
    Sustainable Urban Mobility – Alternative energies, public transport, efficient logistics, planning;
     Sustainable Districts and Built Environment –improving the energy efficiency of buildings and districts, increasing the share of renewable energy sources used and the liveability of our communities;
     Integrated Infrastructures and processes across Energy, ICT and Transport
    Smart City X will be presented as an active member of the planned Lighthouse Projects, inviting institutions, public bodies, industries, city networks, and academia to proactively contribute to the cause.
    To deploy smart city solutions across urban mobility; districts and built environment; and integrated infrastructures, reaching Europe's 20/20/20 energy and climate targets, the concept of Smart City ”Lighthouse Initiatives” is to be implemented, requesting collaboration between the European Commission, Member States and Industry, as well as cities and research institutions.
    Over the next 7 years, a portfolio of at least 20 - 25 lighthouse projects is to be created: each with 6-10 cities (and partners), with the potential for Europe-wide roll out – dependent on levels of commitment, and access to / creation of funds.
    Source: European Innovation Partnership on Smart Cities and Communities - Strategic Implementation Plan 14.10.2013
    http://eu-smartcities.eu/content/presenting-european-innovation-partnership-smart-cities-and-communities
    Smart City X is to be indicated as a city implementing integrated and innovative actions for sustainable urban development with delegated management in the Partnership Contract and the Operational Programmes to have the EU CSF Funding 2014- 2020 benefits:
    Ring-fencing funding for integrated sustainable urban development A minimum of 5 % of the ERDF resources allocated to each Member State shall be invested in integrated actions for sustainable urban development implemented through the Integrated Territorial Investment (ITI) tool, with the management and implementation delegated to cities (Article 7 paragraph 2 of the proposed ERDF regulation).
    The form and degree of the delegation of the management to the cities may vary according to the institutional arrangements of each Member State.
    The cities implementing integrated actions for sustainable urban development with delegated management should be included in a list accompanying the Partnership Contracts (Article 7, paragraph 2) and the operational programme (Article 87, paragraph 2 [c]). These lists are indicative and could be modified during the course of the programming period.
    Urban Development Platform: Based on a list of cities prepared by Member States in their Partnership Contract, the Commission will establish an Urban Development Platform comprising 300 cities throughout Europe, which will stimulate a more policy-oriented dialogue on urban development between the cities at European level and the Commission.
  • Advancing smart city investment projects globally, the Smart Cities Council collected a big pool of leading technology companies in energy, water, IT and communications and transportation: Alstom Grid, AT&T, Bechtel, Cisco, EDF, GE, IBM, Itron, MasterCard, Microsoft, National Grid, Qualcomm, S&C Electric Company, ABB, Alphinat, GRID2020, Invensys, MaxWest, Opower, Sungard and Zipcar.
    They all are committed to share the “vision of a world where digital technology and intelligent design are harnessed to create smart, sustainable cities with high-quality living and high-quality jobs.”
    The Smart City Planning, Inc., a group of 24 Japanese and international eco-technology companies, involved with the Japan’s “FutureCity” Initiative, is looking to globally export smart city solutions (see Smart City Planning, Inc., World Cities Summit, 2012).
    The Group is trying to come up with “a total package of the next-generation urban development”:
    Offshore Wind Power
    Solar Panel
    Smart House
    EV Sharing
    Multi-energy station
    Intelligent Traffic System (ITS)
    Next-gen. Mobility
    Operation Center
    Battery System
    Eco Building Design
    Regional EMS
    (Control center)
    Smart Building supported by Regional EMS
    Mega Solar Plants
    Smart House
    Biomass Energy
    Smart House
    Electric Bus
    Small/Medium sized Smart Building
    Multi-Energy Station
  • Key success factors as the elements of the Intelligent City “X” that must be in place
    Visionary leadership and ambitions
    Visionary strategies and policies
    Organisational and managerial issues
    Specific objectives and timelines
    Stakeholder alignment and citizen engagement
    New operating and financial models
    Information, knowledge and awareness
    “THE FUNDAMENTAL CHALLENGE FOR MUNICIPALITIES TODAY IS HOW TO DELIVER IMPROVED PERFORMANCE AND QUALITY OF LIFE OFTEN WITH FEWER RESOURCES IN A RAPIDLY CHANGING AND INCREASINGLY COMPLEX EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT”.
    Urban performance and wealth is no longer just dependent on a city's hard infrastructure – its 'physical capital' - but increasingly on the availability and quality of ICT, social resources and eco assets.
  •  
    SMART CITY: FUTURE Investment Projects
    Smart Urban Development Platform (Intelligent City Conception and Planning, Green City Strategy, Digital/Intelligent City Strategy, Knowledge City Strategy, integrated digital planning, spatial planning for sustainable land use and smart building development)
    Smart Governance (e-Participation, e-administration, intelligent urban management system)
    Sustainable Energy (renewable energy networks, tri-generation and district heating/cooling systems; advanced metering infrastructure, smart grid, energy management systems, smart domestic appliances, intelligent street lighting, solar power plants)
    Smart Buildings and Facilities (green construction, smart buildings, eco hotels, energy-efficient refurbishment of public buildings, innovative insulation, green roofs; net zero energy buildings)
    Smart Economy (innovative urban economy, smart commercial spaces, innovation, employment opportunities, green tourism and jobs, business clusters)
    Smart Environment (coastal regeneration, seaside environment protection, green infrastructure, eco parks and zones, advanced sewerage system, rainwater harvesting, grey water treatment, living roofs, reduction, re-use and recycling waste, integrated green areas, urban forest and farms)
    Smart Transportation (public transport system, bus routes, cycle lanes, green trails networks)
    ICT (smart network-connected districts, sectors and communities, optical Ethernet, Fiber-To-the-Home access, WiFi zones, smart appliances, urban operation systems, building integration platform, cloud computing, ubiquitous computing, web farms, ICT clusters, smart digital services, ICT jobs)
    Intelligent Community (sense of community, social cohesion, innovative ecosystems and creative communities, knowledge triangles, knowledge parks, knowledge jobs)
    Sustainable Lifestyle (smart community complexes, leisure and health centers, cultural centers, athletic centers, green lifestyle, smart lifestyle, intelligent lifestyle)
    The smart city strategy is enriching the urban planning scenarios of the conventional city (layer 0), sets green city policy actions (layer 1), formulate policies for
    interconnected, instrumented, open and intelligent city (layers 2,3,4 and 5) and advances measures to mobilize city’s innovation ecosystem (6) by capitalizing on the new business models offered in smart environments.
     
  • Smart City “X”: Investment Areas
    i-City Management Platform & Smart Governance System
    Smart ICT, Optical Transportation, and Mobile Networks
    Smart and Green Energy
    Smart and Sustainable Water
    Smart and Sustainable Waste
    Smart Mobility and Green Transportation
    Smart and Green Building and Sustainable Construction
    Smart People and Knowledge Workers
    Smart Government and Intelligent Administration
    Smart Business and Commerce
    Smart Safety and Health
    Smart Culture, Education, Research and Innovation
    Innovative Technologies and Solutions to be deployed in Smart City
    Digital Community Technologies, Networks, Systems, and Devices
    Intelligent Community Digital Platform, Smart Eco Community Operating System
    Smart city dashboard, or intelligent management system running the city as an integrated whole
    Televisual Centre of Operations, collating and analysing data from urban departments, as well as public utilities, construction sites, etc.
    Next generation fiber optic broadband infrastructure
    Community-wide mixed communications networks, mobile, fiber, WiFi, powerline and RF mesh
    Superfast and ultrafast broadband, a 100% digitally connected city
    City-Wide Open Wi-Fi Communication and Mobile Networks
    New integrated services across health, transport, energy and public safety
    Traffic related sensors to cover signal junctions, traffic signs, car parks and CCTV, all linked to a single control center
    Urban data flow control, such as mobile phone data, vehicle systems, satellite data and camera data, to create an oversight of the city, its daily operations and processes
    Intelligent transport systems and smart ticketing, the roll out of telecare and telehealth, and smart metering networks
    Supply chains of utility service systems e.g. intelligent transport systems, integrated energy networks, assisted living/telecare
    Open-data platform and hackathons, which produce useful and resource-saving applications to better urban life, keeping citizens and visitors informed for weather, air quality, restaurant sanitation scores, building inspection scores, impending legislation, etc.
    Parking apps with parking sensors that show drivers where the nearest available parking spot it, saving time, gas, emissions and money, easing the traffic flow
    All-digital and easy-to-use parking payment systems
    Apps letting citizens tend city furniture — trash cans, call boxes, trees, fire hydrants, etc.
    High-tech waste management systems, Pay As You Throw (PAYT) garbage disposal to encourage people to recycle and waste less; using RFID tools to improve sorting
    A city guide app, with information about sightseeing spots, museums, parks, landmarks, public art, restaurants and real-time traffic data to help citizens and tourists alike improve their experience of the city.
    Dynamic kiosks that display real-time information, concerning traffic, weather and local news
    App or social media-based emergency alert and crisis response systems — every citizen should have access to vital information, a crime that just happened or a storm approaching the city.
    Police forces should use real-time data to monitor and prevent crime
    Public transit, high-speed trains, and bus rapid transit
    OLED street lights and surveillance in high-crime zones
    EV Infrastructure and Charging stations
    A sharing lifestyle urban economy, as car-pooling, ride-sharing and bike-sharing programs
    Smart building technologies, automated intelligent buildings, smart grids, smart meters, intelligent energy storage
    Smart climate control systems in public buildings, homes and businesses
    Traffic rerouting apps, to calculate the best route for each driver to speed up traffic flow and reduce CO2 emissions, to avoid a traffic jam in the peak hours
    Crowd-sourced urban planning, using the wisdom of citizens
    Broadband Internet access for all citizens, eliminating the digital divide and stimulate local economic growth
    Mobile payments via NFC services, everywhere and anytime, for food, apparel, public transportation, etc.
    Smart security technologies, biometrics, surveillance, crime prediction
    Smart infrastructure technologies, digital management of transportation, energy, water and waste management
    Intelligent healthcare technologies, e-health, m-health, connected medical systems and devices, etc.
    Smart governance technologies, e-democracy, e-government, e-education, open data platforms,
    Eco-Engineering Technologies, Eco-Sustainable Land and Environment, Clean Transportation, Green Roads, Living Roofs, Rain-collecting and Water-recycling systems, etc.
    Green, Living, or Cool Roofs covered with gardens and renewable energy systems, wind micro-generation, combined solar systems, etc.
    Sustainable Built Environment and energy efficient real estate
    Social Innovation Technologies, new strategies, concepts, ideas, methods, techniques and organizations that meet communal needs of all kinds — from working conditions, business models and education to quality jobs, safety, security and health — that contribute to sustainable living, improving and strengthening commune life, economy and urban society.
  • 10 ECO CITY COMMANDMENTS
     
    • Eco Community Cohesion or Green Unity, a whole systems convergence of government and administration, ecologically efficient industry, people’s interests, needs and aspirations, harmonious culture, and landscapes, nature, agriculture and the built environment as a single ecosystem.
    • Environmental Planning and Eco Design, comprehensive ecological planning and management and participation of people or citizens, private sectors and public authorities into planning and management processes; any national/urban/rural project is ecologically designed to enhance the health and quality of life of citizens and maintain the ecosystems.
    • Ecological Development, Environmental Infrastructure, Green Energy Networks, Clean Utilities, Eco Real Estate, Eco Buildings, Eco Facilities, Eco Parks, Eco Zones, and Eco Spaces
    • Ecological safety and security –clean air, and safe, reliable water supplies, food, healthy housing and workplaces, municipal services and protection against eco-disasters.
    • Ecological sanitation–efficient, cost-effective eco-engineering for collecting, treating, or utilization (reducing, reusing, and recycling) human excreta and blackwater and all sort of wastes and various classes of sewage, domestic or sanitary, commercial, industrial, agricultural and surface runoff (closed-loop sanitation systems, onsite wastewater treatment systems, sludge processing plants, and waste management systems)
    • Ecological industrial metabolism–resource conservation and environmental protection through industrial transition, emphasizing materials re-use, life-cycle production, energy efficiency, renewable energy, efficient transportation, and meeting human needs.
    • Ecological space integrity–unifying and harmonizing urban landscape, built structures, open spaces such as parks and plazas, connectors such as streets and bridges, and natural features such as waterways and ridgelines, to maximize accessibility of the city for all citizens while conserving energy and resources and alleviating such problems as automobile accidents, air pollution, eco toxicity, hydrological deterioration, heat island effects and global warming.
    • Ecological education, consciousness and awareness– understanding human’s place and role in nature, cultural identity, responsibility for the environment, and changing human’s consumption behavior, enhancing their ability to maintaining high quality urban ecosystems.
    • Environmental impact: ecological benefits/costs, economic benefits and costs, socio-cultural benefits and costs, triple bottom line account, or full cost accounting
    • Eco regulations, standards, and incentives - environmental policy, local, state and federal, nature conservation and protection, NATURA sites, green energy certificates, green buildings certification systems, etc.
     
     
    ENVIRONMENTAL/ECOLOGICAL/GREEN/CLEAN/ZERO CARBON ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGIES
    Cleantech, Greentech, Envirotech for:
    Land and Environment and Landscape,
    Transport,
    Energy (Electricity, Heating, and Cooling),
    Water,
    Waste,
    Communications and ICT
     
    Renewable Energy Technologies:
    Bioenergy (Biomass, Biofuel, Biogas)
    Solar Power
    Geothermal/Airthermal/Hydrothermal/
    Wind Power
    Ocean (Wave/Tidal) Power, Hydropower)
    Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies
    ENERGY Technology Enablers:
    T&D Network Management (Power Grids); Distributed Renewable Management (Smart Grids, Energy-Efficient Systems, Smart Metering; Intelligent Power Generation; Renewable Energy Management
    GREEN Solutions:
    Green Infrastructure
    Green Buildings
    Green Products and Materials
    RES
    Clean Transportation
    Water Management
    Waste Management
    Sustainable Land Management:
    Sustainable Landscaping,
    Organic Agriculture,
    Habitat Conservation,
    Urban Forestry and Parks,
    Soil Stabilization
    SMART LANDSCAPE AND ENVIRONMENT
    SMART LANDSCAPE/INTELLIGENT ENVIRONMENT/URBAN/REGIONAL INTELLIGENCE resides in the combination of
    natural environment and landscape (organism’s surroundings),
    eco infrastructure (skeleton frame),
    utilities, water supply, energy networks, and wastage (body processes, intake, respiration, digestion, excreting),
    digital telecommunication networks (the nerves),
    transportation and mobility (locomotion),
    sensors and tags (the sensory organs),
    embedded intelligence (the brains),
    intelligent software (the knowledge and cognitive competence).
    Landscape diversity:= physical elements (landforms, mountains, hills, and water bodies and the sea); weather elements; biological elements (biodiversity, ecosystem ecology/complexity/diversity, terrestrial, marine, freshwater, atmospheric) and human elements (land use, buildings, structures, artificial water bodies, techno-ecosystems)
  • “The Human Smart Cities Manifesto
    The Human Smart Cities Manifesto builds a network of cities committed to facilitating the development of effective Smart City strategies and its uptake across a range of cultural, geographical, and infrastructural contexts.
    The Manifesto will be signed in Rome, on the 29th of May of 2013 by cities from all over the world.
    Networking Citizen-driven Innovation
    Preamble
    We, the signatories of this Manifesto, come together to address the three main challenges facing our cities today:
    The devastating effects of the financial crisis undermining the European social model. This is leading to severe limitations in cities’ abilities to invest in new infrastructures, and in some areas even for the provision of basic city services such as transportation and social services.
    The increasing threat and disruption brought about by climate change to our territories. As major floods and droughts become ever more common, the environmental effects of urbanisation and the lack of adequate tools and behaviour patterns becomes increasingly evident.
    The demand for more effective representation set forth by our constituencies. The so-called democratic deficit is a cause for alarm for governance at any scale, but it also adds to the difficulty of building trust and engaging citizens in addressing common problems.
    These challenges call for a transformational change in the way we all work, live, play, and build our future, which in turn places a special burden on those of us holding the responsibility to govern such processes with an optimum usage of the public resources available. We are deeply convinced that technological and social innovation can make an invaluable contribution in that direction, if urban policies adequately consider citizens and their innovation capacity the most valuable resource.
    In this crucial time and with these challenges in mind, we reach out to our citizens and enterprises to join us in a broad endeavour of co-creating the most appropriate strategies for each of our cities, as well as implementing them jointly in the years to come.”
    http://www.peripheria.eu/blog/human-smart-cities-manifesto
  • Annex: Outcomes of the 2nd High Level Group meeting, 14 October 2013, Brussels
    The High Level Group of the European Innovation Partnership for Smart Cities and Communities has today adopted the Partnership's 'Strategic Implementation Plan' (SIP). The plan will serve as the basis for speeding up the deployment of Smart City solutions in Europe. A facilitator for any city becoming smart and developing innovative services in this sense is if they can rely on fast, reliable and secure networks that ensure high quality connectivity.
    The SIP is drafted by - and based on a thorough consultation of - a great variety of actors from industry, cities, civil society and research. It focuses on three specific areas: sustainable districts, sustainable urban mobility, and integrated infrastructures across energy, ICT and transport. It proposes a variety of actions to drive forward improvements in these areas. These include a common set of Smart City standards, "open data by default", new ways of designing planning solutions, the creation of "innovation zones", new business models and improving collaborative governance mechanisms dedicated to integrated city planning and management.
    Successful programmes require that the public and private sector work closely together, at local, national and EU level. The SIP is the first result of such cooperation, and now the challenge comes to developing real projects that deliver real improvements to our citizens.
    Such projects require mutual commitments:
    To kick-start projects, the Commission intends to support large, integrated, interdisciplinary and highly visible "Lighthouse Projects" through Horizon2020 funds, with the aim to develop common successful solutions that can be replicated in a large number of cities. In the mid-term, the roll out of successful solutions will be facilitated further across Europe also through regional funds. In addition, the Commission will invest (in cooperation with other organisations) in activities to promote the exchange of know-how and build capacities concerning Smart City activities. The Commission will also ensure that this is linked with on-going and future work to improve framework conditions, for example in regulation, in standardisation and in evaluation/ progress monitoring.
    All members of the High Level Group commit to develop and use open standards and common data formats for technologies deployed in such Smart City solutions, and to ensure interoperability across systems. All members equally commit to making relevant data accessible also to third parties, whilst fully respecting consumer privacy and protecting their legitimate business interests, and to providing integrated policy approaches across the three sectors to their stakeholders.
    Any city, company, association, government or research body is invited to join the commitments of the High Level Group. The European Innovation Partnership will launch an open call for "Smart City and Community Commitments" in early 2014, which should lead to the deployment of smart city solutions that achieve a triple bottom line gain for Europe: better quality of life for our citizens, more competitive industry and SMEs, and more sustainable energy, transport and ICT systems and infrastructures.
     
    http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_MEMO-13-884_en.htm
    MEMO
    Brussels, 14 October 2013
    European companies and regional leaders agree on Action Plan to make Europe's cities smarter
    Commission expected to invest around €200m to create Smart Cities in the next two years.
    For more than 75% of EU citizens their city is their home – it is where they mostly live, work, study and play. Cities are the major source of European economic activity and of innovation. But the global economy is developing and changing fast and European cities need to rise to new challenges and develop and improve. Our cities are also a major source of greenhouse gases and local pollution and we need concerted action to put this right. We can and we should make cities better places to live and to work in. Our cities can become more connected and intelligent, cleaner and healthier and use less energy, more inclusive and fairer. They can be Smart Cities.
    Smart Cities are cities which best use modern technology services and infrastructure, and modern ways of working and raising finance to make real improvements in the everyday lives of the people that live in them and the businesses that generate wealth and employment, and it represents another important contribution to building a digital single market, one of the key issues led by European Commission Vice President Neelie Kroes to be discussed at the European Council on 24th October.
    The Smart Cities and Communities Partnership, who are meeting today in Brussels, brings together city leaders, industry and the research community working to identify and then to deliver, new ways of improving European cities in a more joined up way. The Smart Cities Partnership Strategic Implementation Plan sets out a broad range of new actions and approaches to encourage our cities to become smarter. The plan concentrates on how to drive forward improvement in buildings and planning, new Information Technologies, transport and energy, and new ways of integrating these areas. These approaches include a presumption that data be "open by default" – meaning that the data can be re-used by others to create additional benefits for citizens, businesses and governments.
    The plan also suggests improvements to the way that cities are run with better ways of involving citizens and more collaborative ways of doing things. It suggests innovation zones, new business models, a re-evaluation of rules and legislation and a more standardised approach to data collection and use to enable better comparisons between approaches and between cities.
    This is just the beginning of a large scale programme of work by all the partners and many others. An important part of that work will be the "Lighthouse Projects" - cities which will demonstrate and deliver Smart City solutions on a large scale. These Projects will be partly financed by the European Commission's Horizon 2002 Research Funds. Further business and public funding will help to spread these new solutions to other cities and economies of scale will help to make these "innovative" and "high tech" solutions the norm – available more easily to all cities and neighbourhoods.
    More details about these next steps and about European Commission funding and Business Commitments will be announced at the official launch of the delivery plan on 26 November.
    EUROPEAN COMMISSION
    DIRECTORATE-GENERAL FOR COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS, CONTENT AND TECHNOLOGY
    DIRECTORATE-GENERAL FOR ENERGY
    DIRECTORATE-GENERAL FOR MOBILITY AND TRANSPORT
  • The Integrated Sustainable Urban Development implies that there exists:
    a long-term strategy for future urban development (energy and climate policy)
    a binding urban development plan policy integration (local and regional)
    The city has a comprehensive long-term strategy for sustainable growth policy, like energy and climate policy, with established targets and actions addressing all key urban systems, as energy efficient buildings and districts.
    For the case of Energy efficient buildings & districts, it entails:
    Existence of a Climate Action Plan.
    Existence of a (funding or investment) strategy for energy efficient buildings and districts
    Strategy to address specific obstacles in urban districts (e.g. preserved historical heritage and districts)
    An overarching policy framework and supporting structure is established (e.g. local energy agency, local revolving
    fund or funding scheme, innovative financial schemes, established by city itself, city-owned companies or utility
    Policies and instruments established to promote the benefits of energy efficient buildings and districts to
    consumers (e.g. by information, advice, funding) and market actors (craftsmen, planners, utilities, building
    companies, building project developers etc)
    Policies and measures address both the physical and behavioural dimensions of energy efficient buildings
    Projects and measures are being implemented as a direct consequence of policies and strategies
    Source: See CASCADE Behchmark
  • Smart City “X”, as deployed in a Smart Semantic Cloud Computing System, will be made up of five interdependent control layers:
    smart city applications, software city environments, software city infrastructure, software kernel, and high-performance hardware, as in the i-Community Technical Architecture below:
    3.0 Community/ 3.0 City/SEC Cloud Infrastructure and Applications
    (Software as a Service, SaaS, Web access Portals, User-driven web-based services for citizens and businesses, Front
    end interface to city clouds, applications and services)
    Land Cloud, Transport Cloud, Utilities Cloud, Energy Cloud, Building Cloud, Facility Cloud, Security Cloud,
    Health Cloud, Education Cloud, Government Cloud, Business Cloud, Culture Cloud, Environment Cloud, Citizen
    Cloud; Private Clouds and Public Clouds
    Cloud Regions, Cloud Cities, Cloud Communities
    APPLICATION LAYER (i-City, i-Environment, Digital City Management, Integrated Operations Center,
    Emergency Command Center, i-Government, i-Traffic, i-Home, i-Office, i-Education, i-Health, i-Security, i-
    Entertainment, i-Business, i-Community, i-Life, or Second Life)
    Application Program Interface
    3.0 Community/3.0 City/SEC Cloud Software Environment
    (Platform as a Service, PaaS, eg, Google’s App Engine and Salesforce Customer Relation Management)
    SEMANTIC COMMUNITY REASONING PLATFORM, SMART CITY CLOUD PLATFORM, FUTURE CITY
    INTERNET MIDDLEWARE, INTELLIGENT CITY MANAGEMENT PLATFORM, FUTURE CITY
    OPERATING SYSTEM
    PLATFORM SUPERVISORY LAYER (IT Engine, M2M Engine, App Integration)
    3.0 Community/3.0 City/SEC Software Management Kernel
    (OS kernel, hypervisor, virtual machine monitor and/or clustering middleware; grid and cluster computing applications)
    SMART VIRTUAL MACHINES
    3.0 Community/3.0 City/SEC Cloud Software Infrastructure
    Computational Resources
    (Virtual Machines, Infrastructure as a Service, IaaS, eg, IBM SmartCloud, Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud, EC2 )
    Storage
    (Data as a Service, DaaS, eg, Amazon S3, Urban Service Data Sets and Smart ICT Service Knowledge Bases)
    Communications
    (Communication as a Service, CaaS, eg, Future Internet, Optical Network Infrastructure, as Huawei’s Intelligent
    Optical Distribution Network (iODN), Cisco’s Smart Connected Communities, and Microsoft Connected Service
    Framework (CSF)
    NETWORK LAYER (Internet, Communication Networks, M2M Network, FTTH, GPON, etc.)
    3.0 Community/3.0 City/Firmware / Hardware
    Hardware as a Service, HaaS, eg, IBM Kittyhawk, or HW Cloud Data Centers
    KNOWLEDGE CENTERS, INTERNET OF THINGS, RFID TECHNOLOGIES, M2M HARDWARE, EMBEDED
    SYSTEMS,
    SMART CITY HARD INFRASTRUCTURE
    SENSOR LAYER (PC, Mobiles, Cameras, Information and Network Terminals, RFID Readers, Sensors,
    Actuators, etc.)
    Table 1. The Future Community Framework: the Intelligent Matrix of the Smart Communities of the Future
    To demonstrate its universality and flexibility, the i-Community Matrix is shown to include the existing partial urban management systems as represented by Figures 1-2:
    (Fig. 1. The Microsoft Connected Government Framework 4-layer model: Key Challenges, People and Processes, Application Capabilities and Technologies for Smart Cities. [Credit to Microsoft])
    (Fig 2. Urban Operating System Architecture [Credit to Living PlanIt])
    The Intelligent City Framework consisting of four layers, Sensor Layer, Network Layer, Platform Layer and Application Layer, will constitute a unified city cloud platform expandable to create a future-oriented Smart City system framework.
    The i-City Matrix is to make an Integrated Intercloud Computing Platform, interoperating and interfacing specific urban systems-clouds (Transport Cloud, Utilities Cloud, Energy Cloud, Housing Cloud, Security Cloud, Health Cloud, Education Cloud, etc.), so operating as the intelligent control and command center for the Urban Internet of Things, Systems, Services, Knowledge and Citizens.
    When implemented, we will deliver the 3.0 Community Cloud/Sky Platform, coordinating all the city clouds, from
    the urban infrastructures clouds to the i-government cloud, or from public clouds (transport clouds, utility clouds,
    government clouds, office clouds, security clouds, education clouds, healthcare clouds, culture clouds) to private
    clouds (industrial clouds, finance clouds, smart grids clouds, individual clouds).
    SMART CITY ‘X’ Cloud and services
    Municipal command and control center
    Smart retails systems
    Smart grid
    Communication network optimization
    Home energy management
    Traffic flow optimization
    Factory optimization
    Logistics optimization
    Traffic cameras
    Automated car system
    Intelligent digital signage
    Connected ambulances
    Hospital optimization and Smart health mobile systems
    Intelligent medical devices
    Intelligent Safety and Security Systems
    Intelligent public safety
    Intelligent hospital
    Intelligent devices (medical, electrical, etc.)
    Intelligent street lighting
    Intelligent streets, roads and highway
    Intelligent Digital Citizens
  • Crucially, mobile networks can capture data in real-time from connected devices and machines, such as vehicles and handsets, that are moving around the city.
    In some cases, cities are looking to deploy public services for their citizens via mobile portals and applications, as a way to differentiate themselves from other cities.
    At the same time, there is a growing interest among mobile operators in intelligently connecting many more devices, machines and vehicles to create a so-called Internet of Things that could be used to underpin a smart city.
    However, many mobile operators are unclear how to pursue the smart city opportunity, partly because the concept is still evolving and partly because they have yet to develop business models that could make large-scale smart city services sustainable.
    Moreover, very few cities have a holistic approach to harnessing ICT, making it difficult for mobile operators to identify appropriate decision-makers for smart city projects. “A lot of the stakeholders do not understand the new converging areas with IT and smart cities and the synergies that can be created and miss the opportunity”.
    To date, systems integrators, vendors and few telcos, such as IBM, Cisco and Accenture, Orange, or Alcatel-Lucent, have tended to spearhead smart city implementations.
    Some of these companies are developing comprehensive smart city platforms that can combine data from a large number of sources and generate new insights that can be used to create new services and enhance existing ones.
    By contrast, many mobile operators continue to play a passive role, simply offering standalone M2M solutions aimed at specific vertical sectors. As a result, mobile operators run the risk of being relegated to a commodity supplier of connectivity to companies offering higher-value services, such as data aggregation, data analytics and new service creation.
    GSMA Smart Cities. Guide to Smart Cities: The Opportunity for Mobile Operators, 2013
    Vodafone M2M standalone solutions for towns and cities: the latest smart city and connected living technology
    the GSMA Connected City Vodafone M2M
    Energy Data Management platform
    Connected Cabinet, Smart Street Lighting and digital advertising powered by Vodafone’s unique MachineLink 3G terminal, the first of its generation to combine hardware and software to automatically manage M2M connectivity from the end-user device.
    A complete solution
    M2M deployments can be extremely complex, involving a mix of devices, networks and applications, which in many cases have to come from multiple suppliers.
    We deliver an end-to-end solution that includes:
    M2M terminals, designed for use in signage, cameras, sensors, and more
    Fully managed connectivity, on the world’s most expansive, reliable, and secure wired and wireless networks
    Our Global M2M Platform, which provide a single secure web-based tool for monitoring and managing all M2M services and requesting support
    Logistics, including help with forecasting, setting up tariffs and billing, and working with third parties.
    Comprehensive support, including a dedicated service management team and a global, 24x7 service desk for ordering, fault reporting and operational issues
    World-leading SLAs, tailored to your objectives
    Vodafone Global M2M Platform offers a single web-based interface for tracking the status of all M2M devices in real time and for raising support issues and provisioning requests.
    http://www.m2m.vodafone.com/why_vodafone/
  • SMART City “X” can capture the value from the Smart Cloud Platform and IoE by the intelligent management and optimization of its resources and infrastructure to
    serve the best needs of its visitors, citizens, communities, sectors and businesses.
    WHO BENEFITS?
    IoE is capable of helping organizations achieve many public-policy goals, including increased economic growth and improvements in environmental sustainability, public safety and security, delivery of government services, and productivity.
    Smart Cities, Internet of Things: 50 Sensor Applications for a Smarter World
    Smart ParkingMonitoring of parking spaces availability in the city.
    02
    Structural healthMonitoring of vibrations and material conditions in buildings, bridges and historical monuments.
    03
    Noise Urban MapsSound monitoring in bar areas and centric zones in real time.
    04
    Smartphone DetectionDetect iPhone and Android devices and in general any device which works with WiFi or Bluetooth interfaces.
    05
    Electromagnetic Field LevelsMeasurement of the energy radiated by cell stations and WiFi routers.
    06
    Traffic CongestionMonitoring of vehicles and pedestrian levels to optimize driving and walking routes.
    07
    Smart LightingIntelligent and weather adaptive lighting in street lights.
    08
    Waste ManagementDetection of rubbish levels in containers to optimize the trash collection routes.
    09
    Smart RoadsIntelligent Highways with warning messages and diversions according to climate conditions and unexpected events like accidents or traffic jams.
    Smart Environment
    10
    Forest Fire DetectionMonitoring of combustion gases and preemptive fire conditions to define alert zones.
    11
    Air PollutionControl of CO2 emissions of factories, pollution emitted by cars and toxic gases generated in farms.
    12
    Snow Level MonitoringSnow level measurement to know in real time the quality of ski tracks and allow security corps avalanche prevention.
    13
    Landslide and Avalanche PreventionMonitoring of soil moisture, vibrations and earth density to detect dangerous patterns in land conditions.
    14
    Earthquake Early DetectionDistributed control in specific places of tremors.
    Smart Water
    15
    Potable water monitoringMonitor the quality of tap water in cities.
    16
    Chemical leakage detection in riversDetect leakages and wastes of factories in rivers.
    17
    Swimming pool remote measurementControl remotely the swimming pool conditions.
    18
    Pollution levels in the seaControl realtime leakages and wastes in the sea.
    19
    Water LeakagesDetection of liquid presence outside tanks and pressure variations along pipes.
    20
    River FloodsMonitoring of water level variations in rivers, dams and reservoirs.
    Smart Metering
     
    21
    Smart GridEnergy consumption monitoring and management.
    22
    Tank levelMonitoring of water, oil and gas levels in storage tanks and cisterns.
    23
    Photovoltaic InstallationsMonitoring and optimization of performance in solar energy plants.
    24
    Water FlowMeasurement of water pressure in water transportation systems.
    25
    Silos Stock CalculationMeasurement of emptiness level and weight of the goods.
    Security & Emergencies
    26
    Perimeter Access ControlAccess control to restricted areas and detection of people in non-authorized areas.
    27
    Liquid PresenceLiquid detection in data centers, warehouses and sensitive building grounds to prevent break downs and corrosion.
    28
    Radiation LevelsDistributed measurement of radiation levels in nuclear power stations surroundings to generate leakage alerts.
    29
    Explosive and Hazardous GasesDetection of gas levels and leakages in industrial environments, surroundings of chemical factories and inside mines.
    Retail
     
    30
    Supply Chain ControlMonitoring of storage conditions along the supply chain and product tracking for traceability purposes.
    31
    NFC PaymentPayment processing based in location or activity duration for public transport, gyms, theme parks, etc.
    32
    Intelligent Shopping ApplicationsGetting advices in the point of sale according to customer habits, preferences, presence of allergic components for them or expiring dates.
    33
    Smart Product ManagementControl of rotation of products in shelves and warehouses to automate restocking processes.
    Logistics
    34
    Quality of Shipment ConditionsMonitoring of vibrations, strokes, container openings or cold chain maintenance for insurance purposes.
    35
    Item LocationSearch of individual items in big surfaces like warehouses or harbours.
    36
    Storage Incompatibility DetectionWarning emission on containers storing inflammable goods closed to others containing explosive material.
    37
    Fleet TrackingControl of routes followed for delicate goods like medical drugs, jewels or dangerous merchandises.
    Industrial Control
    38
    M2M ApplicationsMachine auto-diagnosis and assets control.
    39
    Indoor Air QualityMonitoring of toxic gas and oxygen levels inside chemical plants to ensure workers and goods safety.
    40
    Temperature MonitoringControl of temperature inside industrial and medical fridges with sensitive merchandise.
    41
    Ozone PresenceMonitoring of ozone levels during the drying meat process in food factories.
    42
    Indoor LocationAsset indoor location by using active (ZigBee) and passive tags (RFID/NFC).
    43
    Vehicle Auto-diagnosisInformation collection from CanBus to send real time alarms to emergencies or provide advice to drivers.
    Smart Agriculture
     
    44
    Wine Quality EnhancingMonitoring soil moisture and trunk diameter in vineyards to control the amount of sugar in grapes and grapevine health.
    45
    Green HousesControl micro-climate conditions to maximize the production of fruits and vegetables and its quality.
    46
    Golf CoursesSelective irrigation in dry zones to reduce the water resources required in the green.
    47
    Meteorological Station NetworkStudy of weather conditions in fields to forecast ice formation, rain, drought, snow or wind changes.
    48
    CompostControl of humidity and temperature levels in alfalfa, hay, straw, etc. to prevent fungus and other microbial contaminants.
    Smart Animal Farming
    49
    HydroponicsControl the exact conditions of plants grown in water to get the highest efficiency crops.
    50
    Offspring CareControl of growing conditions of the offspring in animal farms to ensure its survival and health.
    51
    Animal TrackingLocation and identification of animals grazing in open pastures or location in big stables.
    52
    Toxic Gas LevelsStudy of ventilation and air quality in farms and detection of harmful gases from excrements.
    Domotic & Home Automation
    53
    Energy and Water UseEnergy and water supply consumption monitoring to obtain advice on how to save cost and resources.
    54
    Remote Control AppliancesSwitching on and off remotely appliances to avoid accidents and save energy.
    55
    Intrusion Detection SystemsDetection of windows and doors openings and violations to prevent intruders.
    56
    Art and Goods PreservationMonitoring of conditions inside museums and art warehouses.
    eHealth
    57
    Fall DetectionAssistance for elderly or disabled people living independent.
    58
    Medical FridgesControl of conditions inside freezers storing vaccines, medicines and organic elements.
    59
    Sportsmen CareVital signs monitoring in high performance centers and fields.
    60
    Patients SurveillanceMonitoring of conditions of patients inside hospitals and in old people's home.
    61
    Ultraviolet RadiationMeasurement of UV sun rays to warn people not to be exposed in certain hours.
    By enabling new and more meaningful connections, governments and other public-sector agencies worldwide can benefit and ultimately create quantifiable benefits for citizens.
    IoE's $4.6 trillion promise for public sector orgs
     
    Cities that embrace the Internet of Everything (IoE) can create value by saving money, improving employee productivity, generating new revenue (without raising taxes) and enhancing citizen benefits. That's according to a new study from Council Lead Partner Cisco that suggests IoE could generate $4.6 trillion in value for public sector organizations over the next decade. Cities, meanwhile, could see $1.9 trillion of that.
    Cities can capture the value from IoE by implementing some "killer apps," Cisco suggests. For example:
    Smart buildings are poised to generate $100B by lowering operating costs by reducing energy consumption through the integration of HVAC and other systems.
    Gas monitoring could generate $69B by reducing meter-reading costs and increasing the accuracy of readings for citizens and municipal utility agencies.
    Smart parking could create $41B by providing real-time visibility into the availability of parking spaces across a city. Residents can identify and reserve the closest available space, traffic wardens can identify non-compliant usage, and municipalities can introduce demand-based pricing.
    Water management could generate $39B by connecting the household water meter over an IP network to provide remote information on use and status.
    Road pricing could create $18B in new revenues by implementing automatic payments as vehicles enter busy zones of cities, improving traffic conditions and raising revenues.
    ITS or Smart Road Systems
    Among the different smart transportation systems we can name intelligent traffic management systems, smart charging for EVs and intelligent public transportation systems. All of them are based on the use on sensors and different degrees and types of M2M technology.
    In the Seoul Underground, all the lines use smart payment systems that use RFID and NFC technology for automatic payment, allowing the customers to pay their tickets with their smartphones. A specific model of phone can even be topped up the same way and in the same terminals used for the t-money cards.
  • INTELLIGENT COMMUNITY AND SMART CITY RESOURCES
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/presentations
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smartworl-dabr
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/iworld-25498222
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-cities-28497022
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-cities-27402134
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/30-cityeu-prototype
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-property
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/ibuilding-26545480
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/innovationrussia
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/ss-21105098
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/moscow-smart-territory-of-the-future-compatibility-mode
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/ss-9714384
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/skolkovo-26893979
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-europe
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/igermany
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-britain
    http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-cyprus-2013-2020
  • Smart Sustainable City: Digital City + Green City + Intelligent City

    1. 1. SMART SUSTAINABLE CITY “X” PROGRAM: SUSTAINABLE SMART CITIES GLOBAL INITIATIVE : SMART SUSTAINABLE URBANISM VS. SMART URBANISM THE I-CITY “X” PLATFORM IS TO COLLECT BIG DATA FROM SMART COMPUTING, INTELLIGENT INSTRUMENTATION, SMART DEVICES AND SENSORS EMBEDDED IN ITS STREETS AND ROADWAYS, POWER AND WATER GRIDS, BUILDINGS AND OTHER CITY ASSETS, INTERCONNECTED VIA SMART COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS, WIRED, WIRELESS AND MOBILE, USING SMART SOFTWARE FOR DELIVERING INTELLIGENT INFORMATION AND SERVICES: DIGITAL CITIZENS, SMART POLITICS, SMART HEALTH, SMART EDUCATION, SMART HOME, SMART UTILITIES (WATER, ENERGY, WASTE, TRANSPORTATION, INFORMATION), SMART SAFETY AND SECURITY, ONLINE TAXES AND PERMITS, UTILITY BILLS, E-PAYMENTS, GIS INFORMATION ON CABLES, PIPES, WATER MAINS, TRAFFIC MAPS, CRIME REPORTS, EMERGENCY WARNINGS, CULTURAL EVENTS, ETC. HTTP://WWW.SLIDESHARE.NET/ASHABOOK/AZAMAT-ABDOULLAEV THE FUTURE WORLD CITIES: Smart Sustainable Cities™ for the World’s 100 largest Urban Areas. Living on the iCITY Platform “The only path to sustainable development is through sustainable cities, while most of the world’s media and political leadership focus on national and international geopolitical issues: the economic crises in Europe, climate change, the Arab Spring, the “war on terror,” China’s ascendancy.” (World Bank, the Partnership for Sustainable Cities). In a fast urbanizing world, the global sustainable development largely depends on building urban sustainability with smart urbanism and eco-intelligent urbanization. In China, the accumulated investment in smart and green cities developments is to exceed 2 trillion yuan by 2025, while new India’s government is planning to attract about $1.2 trillion for its 100 smart cities over the next 20 years. http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/sustainable-city; http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/eis-ltd
    2. 2. SMART SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES: POST-2015 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT AGENDA  The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 20 to 22 June 2012, resulted in an agreement by Member States to launch a process to develop a set of sustainable development goals that can be used to pursue focused and coherent action on sustainable development. National consultations on a post-2015 development agenda were performed in more than 70 countries.  The Agenda is potentially differentiated along four dimensions of a more holistic approach: (1) inclusive social development; (2) inclusive economic development; (3) environmental sustainability; and (4) peace and security — which builds upon the three pillars of sustainable development, as a fair and stable global trading system, adequate financing for development, affordable access to technology and knowledge and good governance practices based on rule of law, among others.  The “Smart Sustainable Communities” is an innovative contribution to an UN Action Agenda for Sustainable Development as covering 10 priority challenges:   End extreme poverty including hunger (“poverty eradication is the greatest global challenge facing the world today…Chronic hunger continues to afflict some 1.4 billion people”, failing to survive at less than 1,25 $ per day.)   Achieve development within planetary boundaries   Ensure Effective Learning for All Children and Youth for Life and Livelihood   Achieve Gender Equality, Social Inclusion, and Human Rights for All   Achieve Health and Wellbeing at All Ages   Improve Agriculture Systems and Raise Rural Prosperity   Empower Inclusive, Productive, and Resilient Cities   Curb Human--‐Induced Climate Change and Ensure Clean Energy for All   Secure Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity, Ensure Good Management of Water and Other Natural Resources   Transform Governance for Sustainable Development  REPORT FOR THE UN SECRETARY-GENERAL, 23 October 2013, Sustainable Development Solutions Network, A Global Initiative for the United Nations. http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-world-27173937 The World’s Cities of Tomorrow Azamat Abdoullaev 2015 All Rights Reserved
    3. 3. SUSTAINABLE SMART COMMUNITIES: DYSTOPIA, UTOPIA OR EUTOPIA OF THE 21ST CENTURY  Gaining all fashion in civil society, academia, business and government, smart and sustainable cities describe places of near- ideal socio-economic perfection, utopia, that are governed by intelligent ICT, as pervasive and ubiquitous smart computing, and which society, economy and governance are being driven by sustainability, innovation, creativity, entrepreneurship, and intelligent people.  A New Utopia of the 21st century is then redefined as an ideal commonwealth whose inhabitants enjoy perfect living conditions, or sustainable life, economic, social, ecological, cultural, technological, etc.  There are historically three type of utopias, presented by its champions:  Speculative, Plato’s Republic; New Atlantis, F. Bacon; A Modern Utopia, H.G. Wells, etc.  Satirical, dystopias, Swift’s Gulliver’s Travel; the Iron Heel, J, London; We, Y. Zamyatin; Brave New World, A. Huxley; 1984, G. Orwell; Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia, A. Townsend.  Practical, Utopia, Thomas Moore ; La citta del sole, T. Campanella; Communist Manifesto, K. Marx; Communism, the USSR, China; The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism, J. Rifkin, technological communism, making goods and services priceless, and abundant, and no longer subject to market forces.  Real Utopia implies a body politics (a city-state) where the institutions and policies governed by reason as contrasted with the modern unreasonable polity, divided by self-interest and egoism in public and private life and greed for power, money and riches.  There is risk of building globally dystopian smart communities, as Big Brother Cities, run by machine reason, that is mostly advanced by large corporate interests pushing forward such technologies as the IBM’s Intelligent Operations Center, the Cisco’s Internet of Things, lacking an integrated urban sustainability planning, development and management. There is a high chance of dystopia scenarios of technocratic governance, the corporatisation of city governance and a technological lock-in, or the panoptic city (Rob Kitchin, The Real-Time City? Big Data and Smart Urbanism).  Smart Sustainable Cities fall under practical and practicable utopian commonwealths, questing for an innovation utopia, Eu- Topia, following the vision of future cities with a holistic socio-economic urban planning and intelligent design and running by combined human-machine intelligence, as the Internet of Everything (People, Knowledge, Processes and Machines).  Eutopia is to involve an intelligent communications platform (the Future Internet), a new energy platform (distributed, renewable energy), and a new mobility platform (driverless vehicles and automated drones) giving rise to the Third Industrial Revolution and a new Urban Revolution of Smart and Sustainable Communities and Cities.  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-cities-27402134 FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    4. 4. URBAN REVOLUTION: THE SUSTAINABLE CITIES OF TOMORROW  In a fast urbanizing world, the global sustainable development largely depends on building urban sustainability with smart urbanism and eco-intelligent urbanization: “the only path to sustainable development is through sustainable cities, while most of the world’s media and political leadership focus on national and international geopolitical issues: the economic crises in Europe, climate change, the Arab Spring, the “war on terror,” China’s ascendancy.” (World Bank, the Partnership for Sustainable Cities).  It is estimated that by 2025 two-thirds of the world’s population is likely to live in urban areas, with 95 per cent of the urban population growth in the developing world cities.  Today’s cities already contain more than 50 per cent of the world’s population, account for 75 per cent of global energy consumption and emit 70 per cent of greenhouse gas.  Some 80% of the EU's gross domestic product and almost 90% of China's GDP are produced in the urban communities, concentrating social live, science and technology, culture, trade, business and people, while beset with aging technical, economic and social infrastructure.  It’s increasingly recognized that the integrated urban paradigm of “Smart Sustainable Cities” could be a silver bullet solution for a comprehensive sustainable urban growth in the 21st century, the century of cities.  As an example, in China, the accumulated investment in smart and green cities developments is to exceed 2 trillion yuan by 2025, while new India’s government is planning to attract about $1.2 trillion for its 100 smart cities over the next 20 years.  It is increasingly realized that future city strategy and policy, intelligent design and integrated planning, innovation and technology are the bedrock of the smart sustainable city, where the advanced information and communication technology (ICT) and eco-engineering solutions, with intelligent social capital, are getting the leading role in essentially improving the performance of city systems, services and operations, raising the quality of life and well-being for its citizens.  The Post-Industrial Smart Revolution is to bring forth an Urban Revolution marked with Global Sustainable Urbanization and Smart World Urbanism. and disruptive Urbanity.  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-urban-revolution.  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-world-cities-project-smart-sustainable-cities  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-revolution FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    5. 5. SMART CITIES VS. SMART SUSTAINABLE CITIES™ HISTORY AND ORIGINATION  A Smart Sustainable City™ had been innovated as an urban system where three innovative cities in one, the Urban Trinity of Information Cyber Digitally Smart City, Intelligent/Knowledge Socially Inclusive City and Ecological/Clean, Green, Nature-Wise City.  It is making an integrated development model of future cities, a Smart Sustainable City™, Sustainable Smart City™, Green Intelligent City™, Smart Green City™, Green Smart City™, or Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive City™.  At the Pan-European Smart Cities and Communities Communication Launch Event, the Smart Sustainable City™ Unifying Model, applied by the author for a specific green field locality in EU, Cyprus, in 2009-2010, had been showcased by the European Commission as a European Smart City Prototype for cities and communities.  The concept was first formulated and copyrighted in 2009-2010 (Azamat Sh. Abdoullaev/ Smart EcoCity™ (Intelligent Eco City™), and publicly presented in the keynote at the 11th IEEE International Conference on Computer and Information Technology (CIT-2011).  The concept of Smart and Sustainable Cities is fast replacing all different future city species, kinds and sorts, as smart city, green city, intelligent city, innovation city, digital city, ecological city, energy city, inclusive city, healthy city, productive city, clean and efficient city, adaptive and resilient city, etc.  Not referring to its original sources, the World Bank is advancing “the Partnership for Smart & Sustainable Cities convening private, public, academic, and development partners to explore opportunities for collaboration and share knowledge to promote smarter and more sustainable cities”.  In all, it gets more and more followers in governments, as China and Japan, major corporations, as Toshiba and Huawei, international organizations, as ITU, cities and research entities, largely ignoring the conceptual original authorship and IP Rights.  http://www.cs.ucy.ac.cy/CIT2011/index.php?p=Keynotes;  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-world-cities-project-smart-sustainable-cities  Azamat Sh. Abdoullaev/ Smart EcoCity™ (Intelligent Eco City™): A Development Framework for Sustainable Communities/ISBN 978-9963-9958-1-3; EIS LTD FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    6. 6. SUSTAINABLE SMART URBANISM OR SMART URBANISM  To become intelligent, green and inclusive is the future of any modern city and community.  Smart and Sustainable Cities, their, strategies, policies, eco-engineering solutions and innovative urban technologies are generating interest globally to address the contemporary urban problems: rapid urbanization, stressed city finances, aging infrastructure, rising energy costs, global warming, bad ecology, and competition for global investment and skilled labor, urban poverty, social exclusion and spatial marginalization.  The Smart Sustainable Urbanism (SSU) aims to build a new city or to transform any modern city as environmentally sustainable, inter-connected, instrumented, innovative, and integrated, regionally and globally attractive for businesses, citizens, visitors and investors.  SUSTAINABLY SMART CITY is to be managed by the combined human-machine intelligence, managing its resources, assets, processes and systems: Urban Land and Environment, Roads and Transportation, Energy networks and Utilities, ICT networks and fiber telecom infrastructure, Public and residential buildings, Natural Resources, Water and Waste management, Social infrastructure, Health and safety, Education and culture, Public administration and services, Communities and Businesses. http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-cities-27402134  Considering the 21st century will be a century of cities, most global investment and public funding should/will go for such a disruptively innovative utopian vision instead of practicing a potentially dystopian smart urbanism.  “Smart Urbanism (SU) – the rebuilding of cities through the integration of digital technologies with buildings, neighbourhoods, networked infrastructures and people – is being represented as a unique emerging ‘solution’ to the majority of problems faced by cities today.  SU discourses, enacted by technology companies, national governments and supranational agencies alike, claim a supremacy of urban digital technologies for managing and controlling infrastructures, achieving greater effectiveness in managing service demand and reducing carbon emissions, developing greater social interaction and community networks, providing new services around health and social care etc.  Smart urbanism is being represented as the response to almost every facet of the contemporary urban question”.  [Smart Urbanism: Utopian Vision or False Dawn? International Workshop, Durham University, 20-21 June 2013]. FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    7. 7. TOWARDS A STANDARDAZED DEFINITION OF SMART AND SUSTAINABLE CITIES  Academia and research communities, Government agencies, International organizations (United Nations, ITU, etc.), Big business, Leading market research firms, Trade associations, Standards development organizations, as ISO, BSI, ANSI, IEC, and IEEE, all are working on smart sustainable cities, based on special models and framework, different attributes and features, factors and KPIs, rankings, metrics and policies.  Our original definition is boiled down to "Smart Sustainable City is a complex urban system of a 'knowledge', 'digital', or 'cyber' and 'eco' city”, characterized by the integration, quality and intelligent management of its main features, factors, functions, sectors, systems and processes, such as:  • ICT, telecommunications, communication, computing, connectivity, information and intelligence,  • governance, management and public administration, planning, policy, regulation, participation,  • sustainability, climate change, resiliency, the environment and natural resources, territory, landscape, land use, geography, territory, agricultural areas,  • physical infrastructure, critical assets, technological networks, energy and utilities,  • transport, roads, traffic, and mobility,  • social infrastructure and services, social justice, protection, social inclusion,  • water and waste, air, soil, and spaces,  • built environment, real estate, buildings, housing, parks, public spaces,  • people, society, communities, and citizens, human and social capital, intelligent capital,  • health and education, learning, leisure, sports, and entertainment,  • safety and security, as energy, water and food security and public safety,  • economy and finance, productivity, employment and jobs, commerce, business and entrepreneurship,  • knowledge, science, technology, innovations in ideas, sciences, technologies, processes, and policy,  • creativity, culture, and arts,  • living, welfare, well-being, lifestyle, community life. FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    8. 8. WHAT IS A SMART SUSTAINABLE CITY “X”: HOW IT SHOULD BE DEVELOPED  A Smart Sustainable City “X” is replaceable by any future city or old and legacy city, agglomeration or metropolitan area, from Adelaide to Peking to Limassol to Moscow to London to Washington, which is committed to a holistic smart city conception and definition, integrated urban planning , development and management.  There are many definitions of smart cities, from the infusion of ICT into urban systems to intelligent design and technological optimization to reach full sustainability.  Specifically, a smart city is defined as one in which technology is integrated into a strategic approach to sustainability, citizen well-being, and economic development. In essence, smart cities are a phenomenon created from the convergence of the challenges of modern urbanization and the emergence of new technologies that can address them in a comprehensive way.  The smart city market is to be made up of five main industry sectors: smart energy (and the smart grid), smart transportation, smart water, smart buildings, and smart government (including social services such as health, education, and security) (Navigant Research).  Demographic, environmental, economic, political and socio-cultural factors are forcing the urban world to become more efficient and effective.  A real or true smart city is a unified urban entity with three critical layers/levels/spaces, all planned, developed and managed as its integral parts:  • Digital/ICT/Hi-Tech/Ubiquitous/Cyber/Mobile/Digitally Smart and Intelligent City (Digital/Information Capital; Digital Urban Spaces, Multi-Play Telecom Network, ICT spaces/systems/applications, Sensor Networks, Ubiquitous Computation, Smart Cloud Computing, Network-integrated Real Estate, City OS, Intelligent City Management Platform, Augmented Virtual Reality, Virtual Lifestyle);  • Sustainable/Ecological/Green/Zero-Carbon/Zero-Waste/Eco Friendly/Clean City (Natural Capital; Natural Urban Spaces and Ecosystems, Green Energy Network, Real Eco Estate, Ecological buildings, Green Lifestyle);  • Knowledge/Learning/Innovation/Intelligent/Science/Intellectual/LivingLab/Creative/Human/Social  /Inclusive City/Noopolis (Knowledge Capital; Innovation Systems, Meaningful Urban Spaces, Collective Intelligence, Knowledge Triangle/Ecology, Health Triangle, Human Social City, Intelligent/Smart Lifestyle).  A truly smart city is three innovative cities in one, the Urban Trinity of Information Cyber City, Intelligent/Knowledge City and Ecological/Clean city, making an integrated model of future cities, a Smart Sustainable City™, Sustainable Smart City™, Green Intelligent City™, Smart Green City™, or Sustainable Smart and Inclusive City™, first announced in the keynote.  It is essential to draw distinctions between a smart city, as a unified urban entity, and “smart city” technologies, applications, and systems, as well as fragmented “smart city” projects, lacking the overall conception of the smart city project and resulting in unsustainably over-costly ventures. http://eu-smartcities.eu/blog/what-not-smart-city  "A Smart World: A Development Model for Intelligent Cities“, http://www.cs.ucy.ac.cy/CIT2011/index.php?p=Keynotes FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    9. 9. HOW TO DEVELOP TOMORROW’S CITIES TODAY  The Global Report on Human Settlements (Planning Sustainable Cities) argues that future urban planning must take place in the context of the factors shaping 21st-century cities: environmental challenges; demographic challenges; economic challenges; socio-spatial challenges and inequalities; political challenges of decision-making as well as of social and economic rights among ordinary citizens.  The Report states: In many parts of the world, there still persist either conventional forms of urban planning, as in the developing cities, or market-led urban development in the developed world, having serious and negative environmental and social impacts.  Specifically, unrealistic urban planning regulations can force the poor to violate laws in order to survive, with more than 1 billion slum dwellers worldwide, just to double over the next generation, like the whole urban population.  The Smart Sustainable City “X” Planning approach postulates that there must be a fundamental blueprint to sustainable settlements fundamentally resolving critical urban issues (land use and environment, transportation and mobility, water, waste, energy, environmental degradation, and social issues as poverty and social exclusion and displacement) regardless of that each city is marked by its specific political systems, cultural settings, economic structures and ecological climates in which it continually and historically evolves.  http://eu-smartcities.eu/blog/eu-urban-agenda-sustainable-cities-pilot-case-smart-limassol The full concept of Smart City entails that there is a single model and universal approach to sustainable urban planning (in large legacy cities > 0,5 m, new megacities > 10 m and hypercities > 20 m, as well as in medium-sized settlements, 0,1-0,5 m and small urban places ,< 0,1m) that can solve fundamental urban problems and emerging urban challenges of the 21st century. http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smartworl-dabr  In sum, any sustainable city or intelligent community is to offer not only new or improved methods of urban development, management and maintenance, but a comprehensive, holistic approach, embracing all city systems, processes, and service in an integrated smart city urban planning, all to be run by intelligent management governance systems, the “brains” of the Urban Internet of Everything. http://www.cs.ucy.ac.cy/CIT2011/files/SMARTWORLD.pdf  FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    10. 10. SMART SUSTAINABLE CITY “X” PLANNING SYSTEM  The evolution of sustainable urban planning is reflected in its lexical multiplicity and generalization: spatial planning, land-use planning, physical planning, city planning, town (and regional) planning, and development planning; urbanisme and urbanization, or development planning, master plan, comprehensive city plan and detailed plan; strategic and integrated activity  of government, or urban (public) management, and environmental planning/management, including both the natural and built environment.  The traditional forms of urban planning are not only inappropriate for addressing the new challenges, as rapid urbanization, climate change, resource shortages and energy costs, traffic congestion and pollution, urban poverty and poor housing or aging infrastructures, but in some circumstances may be directly contributing to the exacerbation of urban life, its poverty, safety and security, social exclusion and spatial marginalization.  There are several key characteristics of the Smart City Planning System as distinguished from the standard urban planning systems.  First, introducing the concept of smart and sustainable growth into urban planning, design and management allows to manage the process of urbanization through integrated development planning, effective land-use planning, mobilization of resources and capacity- building (in urban land, urban environment, municipal finance, urban infrastructure and urban poverty): making land and infrastructure available for low-income housing in healthy and safe locations, while providing education, healthcare, employment, community financing and other social services within the areas.  Second, smart urban planning is no more a technical exercise in the physical planning and design of human settlements, with environmental, technological, social, economic or political matters lying outside the scope of planning: http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-cities-27402134  The Smart City planning is no more just a formal activity to be carried out by trained experts with relatively little involvement of civic society, local authorities, businesses, politicians or communities.  Third, the Smart Sustainable City Planning is about producing comprehensive city development plans covering urban master plans, or blueprint plans, portraying ideal visions of the future, and layout plans and local plans, showing a detailed view of the built form of a city in its ideal end-state.  It is underpinned by directive plans and strategic plans and implemented by the primary legal tool of the land-use zoning schemes.  Fourth, there must be a close alignment and synergy between smart city development plans and strategic spatial plans and the system of land laws and land-use management, with an effective mechanism for this linkage. FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    11. 11. SUSTAINABLE CITY MASTER PLANNING  Townsend in his book, “Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia”, views the push towards smart cities as being led by the wrong people – technology companies with naïve visions and short term commercial goals; while the architects, planners and scientists… often struggle to share their specific knowledge.  The Global Report on Human Settlements (Planning Sustainable Cities) central argument is still valid: urban planning systems have changed very little being often contributors to urban problems, and that a new role for urban planning has to be found to realize the goal of sustainable urbanization of liveable, productive and inclusive cities, towns and villages.  The Smart Sustainable City Development Plan provides guidance for specific urban projects, which in the context of developed Europe are to be strategically integrated ‘brownfield’ urban regeneration projects.  For the developing India or China, it could be brand new smart and green cities with sustainable and integrated infrastructural projects, considering that 40,000 new cities will be needed by 2050 to accommodate another 3 billion residents, mostly from these two leading Asian powers.  In all, the Future Master Planning sets out future spatial and functional patterns and economic, social and ecological relationships for transformation cities, emerging as sustainable innovation ecosystems of interrelated urban systems, technological systems, social systems, economic systems and government systems.  As far as the smart city market is projected to exceed $ 1 trillion by 2016, while annual global urban infrastructure investments make about $10 trillion, it’s the trillion dollar question: who is to plan our cities: big architectural and engineering firms practicing standard urban planning with some innovations, or big technology businesses pushing for the adoption by cities and states their “lock-in” technologies and services? FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    12. 12. HOW TO REDEVELOP OLD CITIES: SMART AND SUSTAINABLE URBAN RENEWAL  Smart and Sustainable Urbanism (SSU) – the rebuilding of cities through the integration of holistic urban planning, eco- engineering solutions and digital technologies with land and the environment, urban ecology, fabric, forms and flows, the built environment, physical and social infrastructures, networked infrastructures, socio-economic environment, government and administration, communities, districts and neighborhoods, and people – is a unique emerging ‘solution’ to the majority of problems faced by cities today.  Applying an integrated urban planning (creating and following new regulations and standards for land use and zoning, ecology, transportation, roads and streets, housing, sanitation, water supply, sewage, public spaces, public health conditions, education, security and other social services)  Performing comprehensive urban renewal for a whole urban environment and living (rebuilding, land reuse, building, rehabilitation, area conservation, relocation , or housing reform)  Taking into account the Urban context:  Population, density, area, climate, ecology and geography, economy, existing urban planning….)  • Natural Resources demand (energy, water, food, land): eg, energy consumption per sector, CO2 emissions per sector, etc.  • Natural Resources supply and infrastructure: eg, energy mix (share of renewables, fuel, nuclear…), approx. energy price, energy company, energy infrastructure (district heating, share of distributed generation)  • Building stock: % residential sector, commercial sector, facilities, services, industry, number of units …  • Transport: modal split, multimodality, public transport characteristics, footing, cycling…  • Regional and national context: national conditions and incentives for sustainable development in your country (national programmes, rules, incentives, tax regulations, implementation of standard directives…)  • City competences and resources: competences and resources under local governments in your country (compared to regional, national governments) related to sustainable city policies; city budget dedicated to sustainable development policies.  Covering the systemic approach of the City Protocol , “a new open, global, and progressive working framework for cities worldwide to assess and improve performance in environmental sustainability, economic competitiveness, quality of life, and city services, by innovating and demonstrating new leadership models, new ways of engaging society, and by leveraging new ICT… The city should be adaptive, learning, evolving, robust, autonomous, self-repairing, and self-reproducing”. http://www.cityprotocol.org. FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    13. 13. SMART MEGATRENDS: SMART CITY GLOBAL COMPETITION  The question of who is to lead the future cities market is getting a global meaning as far as global competitors are actively pursuing large Smart City programs as part of smart revolutions: http:// www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-revolution  In its Five-Year National Planning, China’s future “smart cities” are to become a main driver of its urbanization process, with 2 trillion yuan ($322 billion) to be allocated to more than 600 cities nationwide by 2025.  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-china  China’s going for “the business as usual” approach consisting in requesting the fragmented services from the increasing army of urbanplanners and architects, operators and exporters of smart city technologies, products and services, which SMART City “X” should avoid: Following the India Vision 2020, the nation is embarking on an ambitious $90 billiontwo-phase industrial program to build new industrial cities as smart, sustainable cities of the future, along a territorial corridor, spanning six states, connecting two capitals, Delhi and Mumbai, and affecting 14% of India’s population. Conceptualized with the Government of Japan, the DMIC program master plan is mostly focusing on deploying next generation technologies and road/rail/air connectivity and infrastructure linkages, with 24 economic nodes, investment regions and industrial areas. The goal is to expand national manufacturing and services base, becoming a "Global Manufacturing and Trading Hub”, minimizing green growth and social development programs.  The Japanese Government created a “FutureCity” with a goal to “construct sustainable cities with superior environmental technologies, core infrastructure and resilience all over the world…to advance the “Future City” model of urban planning with state-of-the-art environmental sustainability, strong disaster resilience and superb livability”. http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-japan  The European Union has embarked on a long-term strategy for a smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. There are more than 100 000 cities, towns and communities in EU, with a fierce competition for resources, local, regional and global, and public and private capital. Only innovative cities, towns and communities with innovative public projects will have a strong competitive advantage.  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/urban-europe  The European Commission established a European Innovation Partnership (EIP) on Smart Cities and Communities.  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-europe  Russia’s expenses just for its intelligent model community (Skolkovo Innovation Center) might exceed $15 billion, not mentioning it’s planned multibillion infrastructure projects. http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/sustainable-russia  Again, following the mega trend of smart global urbanization, the UK Government organized the Smart Cities Forum coordinatedby Technology Strategy Board, with very useful initiative of the Future Cities Demonstrator competition:  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-britain FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    14. 14. A SUSTAINABLE URBAN WORLD AGENDA FOR EUROPE: THE CASE OF SMART URBAN EUROPE 2020  The recent EU Future CITIES major forum signaled that an Urban Europe Agenda is getting an official attention as a key mechanism of the EU Strategy 2020, developing the smart, sustainable, and inclusive Europe:  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-europe  Among the questions for debates there were as follows:  Why do we need an EU urban agenda?  What should an EU urban agenda be?  How can an EU urban agenda be implemented?  If the first question is just rhetorical, the rest two bear critical importance , as indicated, in Europe there are more than 100,000 cities and communities, with almost 80% as urban dwellers, all looking to improve their communal wealth and urban life through sustainable integrated solutions.  To be most effective, we believe, an EU urban agenda should be a Global Comprehensive Strategy and Reference Framework for sustainable cities and intelligent communities, comprising the following key features:  Guiding principles with a system of goals and objectives with measurable targets  Integrated sustainable urban development policy covering the economic, environmental, climate, political, technological and social challenges of urban life Integrated investment strategy meeting the economic, environmental, political, technological, digital and social problems of urban life  Implementation roadmap to realize integrated territorial re/development in the most systematic ways (to secure a minimum of 5 % of the ERDF resources allocated for integrated actions for sustainable urban development)  Urban Europe Development Platform for coordinating actors and policies, European, national and local: http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/urban-europe  In all, on the European level, the Urban Europe Intelligent InterCloud Platform is proposed, where each MS and major city will be featured by its smart cloud system: https://eu-smartcities.eu/forum/smart-green-europe.  On the urban level, each intelligent community and smart city is projected to be managed by its urban brains, an intelligent city cloud platform, managing its resources, assets, processes and systems: Urban Land and Environment, Roads and Transportation, Energy networks and Utilities, ICT networks and fiber telecom infrastructure, Public and residential buildings, Natural Resources, Water and Waste management, Social infrastructure, Health and safety, Education and culture, Public administration and services, Communities and Businesses. http://eu-smartcities.eu/blog/eu-urban-agenda-sustainable-cities-pilot-case-smart-limassol FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    15. 15. BARRIERS TO SMART CITIES: PRIVATION OF HOLISTIC VISION, SYSTEM VIEW AND INTEGRATED APPROACH  inertia, conservatism, or resistance to innovative forms of future developments  lack of sustainable policies and regulations and financing  lack of comprehensive future community strategy  lack of integrated urban design and planning  lack of a vision, visionary and determination for innovations, social, technological, economic, and ecological  lack of sustainability commitment in community government  lack of funding for socially sustainable investment, limited public funding capacity: high public deficits, incapacity to raise funding from capital markets  lack of sustainability in public procurement rules, regulations and laws  poor innovation culture and lack of innovative technology knowledge  poor citizen engagement, government participation and social inclusion  monopoly of large commercial interest groups  uncertainties around innovation technologies scaling  new urban technology is not well-understood across city sectors  existing governance, financing and procurement models are ill-suited for urban systems integration  lack of innovative financial schemes and business models  lack of integration of technologies, poor interoperability and integration of city systems  lack of smart community ecosystem of citizens, government, technology vendors  Incremental, siloed , isolated and piecemeal implementation models FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    16. 16. DYSTOPIAN CONCERNS OF SMART URBANISM  Offering an attractive vision of future cities, more efficient, sustainable, competitive, productive, open and transparent, the Smart Urbanism implies also a number of fundamental concerns, which are prevented with the Smart Sustainable Urbanism:  Technocratic urban governance  The drive towards managing and regulating the city via information and analytic systems promotes a technocratic mode of urban governance which presumes that all aspects of a city can be measured and monitored and treated as technical problems which can be addressed through technical solutions.  Technocratic forms of governance are highly narrow in scope and reductionist and functionalist in approach, based on a limited set of particular kinds of data and failing to take account of the wider effects of culture, politics, policy, governance and capital that shape city life and how it unfolds  The corporatisation of city governance and a technological lock-in  Alongside the critique that smart city governance is too technocratic in nature is a concern that it is being captured and overtly shaped by corporate interests for their own gain (Townsend, A., Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia; Townsend, A., Maguire, R., Liebhold, M. and Crawford, M., A Planet of Civic Laboratories: The future of cities, information and inclusion. Institute for the Future, Palo Alto).  The smart city agenda and associated technologies are being heavily promoted by a number of the world’s largest software services and hardware companies who view city governance as a large, long-term potential market for their products.  The panoptic city (an all-seeing vantage point)  With the development of various forms of directed, automated and networked digital technologies, there have been increasing concerns over the rising level of surveillance in societies. It is now possible to track and trace individuals and their actions, interactions and transactions in minute detail across a number of domains (work, travel, consumption, etc). Big data and data control centres integrate and bind data streams together, work to move the various oligopticon systems into a single, panoptic vantage point and raise the spectre of a Big Brother society based on a combination of surveillance (gazing at the world) and dataveillance (trawling through and interconnecting datasets), and a world in which all aspects of a citizen’s life are captured and potentially never forgotten. (Rob Kitchin, The Real-Time City? Big Data and Smart Urbanism; ‘Smart Urbanism: Utopian Vision or False Dawn’ workshop at the University of Durham, 20-21 June 2013). FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    17. 17. FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015 SMART SUSTAINABLE CITY ARCHITECTURE Social City/ Town/ Community SUSTAINABLE SMART CITY “X” i-City Platform Eco- City/ Town/ Community Digital City/ Town/ Community Physical Capital Natural Capital Ecosystems Natural Resources Renewables/RES Eco Technologies Green Infrastructure Eco-Urbanization Green Society ECO-SUSTAINABLEGROWTH Information/DigitalCapital Smart Computing, Smart Mobile Services, ICT Infrastructure, OTN, Optical Networks , NG Broadband 3DTV, HDTV, CC, Intelligent Clouds Internet of Things, u-Computation Digital/Cyber Society TECHNOLOGICAL/SMARTGROWTH Social/Human/I-Capital Innovation Ecosystems Smart Living Smart Economy Knowledge Infrastructure i-Industry Smart Governance Equity, Wellbeing, QoL Knowledge Society SOCIAL/INCLUSIVE GROWTH SUSTAINABLE Smart URBAN TRINITY of Wellbeing, Quality of Life and Sustainable Growth
    18. 18. SMART SUSTAINABLE CITY “X” INVESTMENT STRATEGY  In 2014-2015, Most Worldwide Spending on Smart City Projects Will Be Focused on Intelligent ICT, Energy, Transportation, and Public Safety, mainly Funded by National or International Government and governed by Joint Ventures or PPP.  The “Smart City “X” Investment Strategy aims to transform a city as an intelligent eco city: environmentally sustainable, inter- connected, instrumented, innovative, and integrated, regionally and globally attractive for businesses, citizens, visitors and investors.  Its Vision is to become a Smart City of the Future, Intelligent Eco City or Smart Sustainable Urban Community. While operating, SMART City “X” is to be managed by its urban brains, an intelligent city cloud platform, managing its resources, assets, processes and systems: Urban Land and Environment, Roads and Transportation, Energy networks and Utilities, ICT networks and fiber telecom infrastructure, Public and residential buildings, Natural Resources, Water and Waste management, Social infrastructure, Health and safety, Education and culture, Public administration and services, Communities and Businesses.  As the key challenges, there are recognized the lack of technology and business models standardization, price competition and poor partnership, when each player protects its IP, thus failing to establish a working consortium of general contractors, architect firms, housing companies, IT vendors, auto companies, electronics companies and energy suppliers  Thus, to build a real intelligent community or smart city, all the key sectors of communal life should be covered: land and environment, transportation, mobility, energy, buildings, ICT, water, waste, health, education, safety and security, and other social services, as closely interconnected and interfaced.  Capitalizing on intelligent strategic planning and digital solutions, Smart City “X” is setting forward a total strategic investment package of the next-generation urban development, bettering the existing Smart City Value Chain of Plan, Research/FS and Implementation: {Concept, Design > Estate/Land Space Plan} > {Environment/energy plan> [Traffic plan/Water plan/IT plan/Business plan] >Financing} > {EPC > Production > Device Installation > Infrastructure Supply > Life Support > Community Activities}. (see Smart City Planning, Inc., World Cities Summit, 2012).  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-world-cities-project-smart-sustainable-cities  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-cities-27402134  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-property http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/ibuilding-26545480 FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    19. 19. “SMART SUSTAINABLE CITY “X” DEVELOPMENT PLAN: VISION, OBJECTIVES, PROJECTS AND TIMELINES  VISION: The SMART City “X” Program aims to achieve a vision of becoming a model for intelligent sustainable urban redevelopment, initiating the following Projects:  CREATING OVERALL SMART ECO CITY STRATEGY: Intelligent Community Design, Setting a Comprehensive Intelligent Community and Smart City Agenda/ Strategy/ Vision/Roadmap/MasterPlanning/Technological Platform  Scope: Smart City Branding & Full Sustainability Report & Total Package of the Next-Generation Urban Development  SMART CITY “X” PROJECTS MANAGEMENT PLANNING (Work Breakdown Structure and Project Organization Structure)  Scope: Smart Eco City Program  DEVELOPING SMART CLOUD CITY MANAGEMENT PLATFORM (MUNICIPAL CONTROL AND COMMAND CENTER)  Scope: Urban Management System; Smart Cloud Computing Urban Platform  ORGANIZING SMART CITY SEMINARS FOR COUNCIL MEMBERS, MUNICIPAL STAFF, INVESTORS AND OTHER STAKEHOLDERS  ORGANIZING SMART CITY STAKEHOLDER PLATFORM  ORGANIZING SMART CITY INVESTORS SUMMITS (Local, European, International; Programs and Prospects)  APPLYING AND MANAGING SMART CITY PROJECTS under EU Multiannual Financing Framework 2014-2020  EU Horizon 2020 (Lighthouse Projects); EU CSF Funds 2014-2020 (Integrated Urban Development Platform) FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    20. 20. SMART CITY TEAM AND STAKEHOLDERS: CORE MEMBERS AND PROSPECTIVE PARTNERS  Smart Eco City Developers  EIS Encyclopedic Intelligent Systems Ltd, Smart Cities European Innovation Partnership Stakeholder; Dr Azamat Abdoullaev, Director)  the European Innovation Partnership for Smart Cities and Communities (Action Clusters and Sub-Groups)  Smart Eco Community “X” Consortium  Telecommunication Utilities  (Connected Living, M2M-enabled Smart Cities, M2M solutions for towns and cities, Global M2M Platform, tbc)  Energy Utilities; Transport & Logistics  Research Institutions  (Smart Software and Flow Network Group, Oxford, UK; Prof Michael Todinov); (Intelligent GIS Group, Smart Digital Elevation Model Systems, EU; Dr Tomaž Podobnikar); (Cyprus University of Technology; Smart Cities and Internet of Things, Cyprus, Limassol)  Global Investment Consultants  Global Investment Consultancy Group, New York, USA; Mark Minevich  INITIATIVES:  Smart Cities Global Initiative (2014-2015)  Sustainable States Global Initiative (2014-2016)  Smart Green Europe: EU Smart Urban Agenda  Smart Sustainable City Corporations  EIS (I-World Concept and Smart Sustainable City Strategy)  European Innovation Partnership (Smart Cities and Communities)  IBM (Smarter Planet Initiative)  Cisco Systems (Smart + Connected Communities)  Siemens (Smart Mobility Initiative)  Huawei (Smart City Initiative)  Orange (France Telecom) (Smart City Initiative)  Alcatel-Lucent (Smart City Initiative)  Microsoft (Intelligent City Platform)  Oracle (Intelligent Government Platform)  Toshiba (Intelligent Energy and Smart City)  Schneider Electric (Smart City Initiative)  Hitachi (Smart City Initiative)  Smart City Planning, Inc. (SAP, LG CNS, NEC, HP, etc.)  Smart Cities Council, collects technology companies in energy, water, IT and communications and transportation: Alstom Grid, AT&T, Bechtel, Cisco, EDF, GE, IBM, Itron, MasterCard, Microsoft, National Grid, Qualcomm, S&C Electric Company, ABB, Alphinat, GRID2020, Invensys, MaxWest, Opower, Sungard and Zipcar FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    21. 21. SMART CITY STAKEHOLDERS: MUNICIPAL CONTRIBUTION  CITY COUNCIL LEGAL SUPPORT FOR SMART CITY STRATEGIES AND POLICIES  MAYOR’S SUPPORT FOR SMART CITY STRATEGIES AND POLICIES, PLANS AND PROGRAMS, PROJECTS AND SCHEMES  SIGNING UP THE SMART CITY MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING  PRESENTING A SPACE FOR THE CITY INTELLIGENCE SYSTEM DEPLOYMENT (Municipal Command and Control Center)  ARRANGING SMART CITY CONFERENCES  COVERING EXPENSES FOR SMART CITY CLOUD COMPUTING PLATFORM RENTALS  CONTRIBUTING LOCAL INTELLECTUAL RESOURCES (Urban Planners and Architects, Civil Engineers, Software engineers, Accountants, Legal Advisors, Translators, etc.)  FACILITATING APPLICATIONS TO EU FUNDING SCHEMES 2014-2020  ARRANGING SMART CITY EVENTS FOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC AND INVESTORS (CONFERENCES, SEMINARS, WORKSHOPS, MEETINGS, ETC.)  FACILITATING SMART CITY STAKEHOLDER PLATFORM  FACILITATING SMART CITY INVESTORS SUMMITS (Local, European, International)  ADVANCING SMART CITY CITIZEN INVOVEMENT AND ENGAGEMENT (Information, Knowledge and Awareness, Smart City “X” Websites, Education and Training Programs, press statements and information materials (e.g. flyers, brochures, handouts); events (expert discussions, presentations, conferences, etc.) FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    22. 22. SMART GREEN CITY: CONCEPTUAL REFERENCE FRAMEWORK FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    23. 23. SMART SUSTAINABLE CITY: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES AND SOLUTIONS TO BE APPLIED  Digital Solutions or Smart Community Technologies  Green Solutions or Eco Community Technologies  Social Solutions or Inclusive Community Technologies  Sustainable Community Integrating Technologies,  as Socio-Technological Open Platform,  Internet of Things,  Green ICT,  Smart Healthcare,  Social ICT,  Smart Social Technologies,  and Internet of Everything Technologies. FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    24. 24. GREEN ECO CITY: INVESTMENT PROJECTS AND ECO TECHNOLOGIES  Green Growth Strategy  The starting point is the recognition that sustainable urban development, with each of its four pillars, as ecological, economic, social and technological, reinforced and mutually reinforcing, is the overarching goal of the urban community  Green City “X” has to adopt and implement urban policies and programs that are consistent with a green economy in the context of eco-sustainable development, urban wealth or poverty eradication.  Eco-Engineering Projects and Technologies:  Eco-Sustainable Land and Environment, Clean Transportation, Green Roads, Living Roofs, Rain- collecting and Water-recycling systems, etc.  Green, Living, or Cool Roofs covered with gardens and renewable energy systems, wind micro- generation, combined solar systems, etc.  Sustainable Built Environment and energy efficient real estate.  1. Energy efficient buildings & districts & streets & blocks  2. Renewable energy policies and distributed energy generation  3. Energy in urban transport, utilities, etc. FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    25. 25. HUMAN SMART SUSTAINABLE CITY: TECHNOLOGIES AND INVESTMENT PROJECTS  Inclusive Growth Strategy  The starting point is the recognition that social urban development, with each of its four integrated pillars, ecological, economic, social and technological, is the overarching goal of the urban community  Social or Human Smart City “X” has to adopt and implement urban policies and programs that are consistent with an inclusive economy in the context of social development, urban wealth or poverty eradication.  Social Innovation Technologies and Projects:  new strategies, concepts, ideas, methods, techniques, organizations and institutions  All that meet communal needs of all kinds:  working conditions  business models  education  quality jobs,  safety, security and health  All that contribute to sustainable living, improving and strengthening commune life, economy and urban society.  Smart urban policies and planning consider citizens and disruptive technologies as the most valuable resources. FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    26. 26. SMART CITY “X” AS A LIGHTHOUSE PROJECT MEMBER  Smart City “X” has an opportunity to apply for the planned Lighthouse Projects, inviting institutions, public bodies, industries, city networks, and academia to proactively contribute to the cause.  To deploy smart city solutions across urban mobility; districts and built environment; and integrated infrastructures, reaching Europe's 20/20/20 energy and climate targets, the concept of Smart City ”Lighthouse Initiatives” is to be implemented, requesting collaboration between the European Commission, Member States and Industry, as well as cities and research institutions.  Over the next 7 years, a portfolio of at least 20 - 25 lighthouse projects is to be created: each with 6-10 cities (and partners), with the potential for Europe-wide roll out – dependent on levels of commitment, and access to/creation of funds.  Successful lighthouse initiatives will provide a solid foundation and give confidence to other cities, in the knowledge they can apply tested solutions (and that have already attracted investment) – that will be better, faster, and cheaper to implement a Europe-wide deployment of Smart City concepts. .  Implementation principles to be guided: close city–industry collaboration; outcome and user-centric approach to service design; open governance and information principles; inclusive and balanced SME participation; integration of physical and digital infrastructures; actively seek to innovate, learn, and share knowledge; collaborative governance.  Source: European Innovation Partnership on Smart Cities and Communities - Strategic Implementation Plan 14.10.2013  http://eu-smartcities.eu/content/presenting-european-innovation-partnership-smart-cities-and-communities FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    27. 27. SMART AND SUSTAINABLE CITY: CSF FUNDS FOR INTEGRATED SUSTAINABLE URBAN DEVELOPMENT  Smart City “X” is to be indicated as a city implementing integrated and innovative actions for sustainable urban development with delegated management in the Partnership Contract and the Operational Programmes to have the EU CSF Funding 2014- 2020 benefits:  Ring-fencing funding for integrated sustainable urban development A minimum of 5 % of the ERDF resources allocated to each Member State shall be invested in integrated actions for sustainable urban development implemented through the Integrated Territorial Investment (ITI) tool, with the management and implementation delegated to cities (Article 7 paragraph 2 of the proposed ERDF regulation).  The form and degree of the delegation of the management to the cities may vary according to the institutional arrangements of each Member State.  The cities implementing integrated actions for sustainable urban development with delegated management should be included in a list accompanying the Partnership Contracts (Article 7, paragraph 2) and the operational programme (Article 87, paragraph 2 [c]). These lists are indicative and could be modified during the course of the programming period.  Urban Development Platform: Based on a list of cities prepared by Member States in their Partnership Contract, the Commission will establish an Urban Development Platform comprising 300 cities throughout Europe, which will stimulate a more policy-oriented dialogue on urban development between the cities at European level and the Commission.  It is not a funding instrument, but rather a mechanism for making the contribution of cities under cohesion policy to the Europe 2020 Strategy more visible, facilitating integrated and innovative actions for sustainable urban development and capitalising on the results (Article 8 of the proposed ERDF regulation).  Operations supported by several funds, multi-fund Operational Programmes and cross-financing: The implementation of integrated urban development strategies will be enhanced by the possibility to combine actions financed by ERDF, ESF and CF either at programme or operation level.  Cross-financing between ERDF and ESF of a part of an operation (up to 5 % of each priority axis of an Operational Programme) will remain to complement the multi-fund approach (Article 55, paragraph 8 and 88 of the proposed Common Provisions for CSF Funds 2014-2020).  The Scale and Scope of ITI: the financing of integrated actions is to be ranging from neighbourhood or district level to functional areas such as city-regions or metropolitan areas – including neighbouring rural areas.  Besides, the innovative urban actions (0,2% of the total ERDF allocation) are supported as urban pilot projects, demonstration projects, etc., covering all thematic objectives and investment priorities.  SOURCES: INTEGRATED SUSTAINABLE URBAN DEVELOPMENT. COHESION POLICY 2014-2020 FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    28. 28. INTELLIGENT CLOUD CITY: I-CITY PLATFORM MUNICIPAL COMMAND AND CONTROL CENTER FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015  Smart Sustainable City “X” is to be deployed in a Smart Computing Cloud System of the following functional systems:  Land Cloud, Transport Cloud, Utilities Cloud, Energy Cloud, Building Cloud, Facility Cloud, Security Cloud, Health Cloud, Education Cloud, Government Cloud, Business Cloud, Culture Cloud, Environment Cloud, Citizen Cloud; Private Clouds and Public Clouds, Cloud Communities, Cloud Regions  It will be made up of five interdependent control layers: smart city applications, software city environments, software city infrastructure, software kernel, and high-performance hardware, as below:  Infrastructure and Applications  (Software as a Service, SaaS, Web access Portals, User-driven web-based services for citizens and businesses, Front  end interface to city clouds, applications and services)  APPLICATION LAYER (i-City, i-Environment, Digital City Management, Integrated Operations Center, Emergency Command Center, i-Government, i-Traffic, i-Home, i-Office, i-Education, i-Health, i-Security, i-Entertainment, i-Business, i-Community, i-Life, or Second Life)  Application Program Interface  (Platform as a Service, PaaS, eg, Google’s App Engine and Salesforce Customer Relation Management)  SEMANTIC COMMUNITY REASONING PLATFORM, SMART CITY CLOUD PLATFORM, FUTURE CITY INTERNET MIDDLEWARE, INTELLIGENT CITY MANAGEMENT PLATFORM, FUTURE CITY OPERATING SYSTEM  PLATFORM SUPERVISORY LAYER (IT Engine, M2M Engine, App Integration)  (OS kernel, hypervisor, virtual machine monitor and/or clustering middleware; grid and cluster computing applications)  SMART VIRTUAL MACHINES  NETWORK LAYER (Internet, Communication Networks, M2M Network, FTTH, GPON, etc.)
    29. 29. SMART CITY ‘X’: SMART CLOUD AND SERVICES  Municipal command and control Intelligent governance center  Smart mobile cloud services  Smart retails systems  Smart grids  Communication network optimization  Home energy management Systems  Intelligent Building  Traffic flow optimization  Factory optimization  Logistics optimization  Smart traffic cameras  Intelligent digital signage  Smart NFC services  Automated M2M car systems  Connected ambulances  Hospital optimization and Smart health mobile systems  Intelligent medical devices  Intelligent Safety and Security Systems  Intelligent public safety  Intelligent hospital  Intelligent devices (medical, electrical, etc.)  Intelligent street lighting  Intelligent Transportation  Intelligent streets, roads and highway  Intelligent Digital Citizens  M2M-enabled smart cities FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    30. 30. SMART SUSTAINABLE CITY “X”: MOBILE SMART CITIES  To improve the quality of life of their citizens, cities worldwide are looking to harness ICT to address traffic congestion, air pollution, waste disposal, energy costs, over-crowded public transport and many other challenges.  As leading providers of ICT and related services, mobile operators, the GSMA’s core membership, are well placed to help city administrations become more efficient and effective.  Smart cities are still in their infancy, but it is already clear that they will make extensive use of mobile networks and services. Out of the 150 smart cities the GSMA tracks globally, more than 100 cities have deployed services (beyond smartphone apps) that make use of mobile networks. Half of these cities are located in Europe.  Now is the time for telcos to engage in the emerging smart cities market, representing a strategically important global market in the medium-to-long term.  If they engage with city administrations now, mobile operators will have an opportunity to become an essential part of the city’s social infrastructure, creating a platform for future revenue-generating services that harness big data and cloud computing.  A megatrend is to intelligently interconnect all the mobile devices, machines and vehicles to create a so-called Internet of Things that could be used to underpin a smart city.  Mobile operators can play a role in four key elements of smart city services:  ■ Connectivity/managed connectivity – connecting city infrastructure and individuals’ handsets to central servers  and databases;  ■ Data aggregation/analysis – combining data from multiple sources to produce new insights;  ■ Service delivery – delivering real-time information to people and machines that will enable them to adapt and  respond to events in the city;  ■ Customer interface - providing customer support operations, such as call centers and web portals, as well as  delivering messages to subscribers.  GSMA Smart Cities. Guide to Smart Cities: The Opportunity for Mobile Operators, 2013 FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    31. 31. SUSTAINABLE SMART CITY “X” AS AN INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM  Smart City ‘X” is to integrate urban systems, social systems, economic systems and government systems  Smart City “X” is to built as a sustainable innovation ecosystem:  Innovative (in concepts, processes, technologies, and tools)  Inspiring (active citizen involvement and engagement, attractive to talents, top world researchers, investors and future industries and smart manufacturing)  Integrated (addressing the entire intelligent ecosystem, linked to the national goals, strategies, initiatives, priorities, and targets)  Interactive (communications and interactions between people, places, infrastructure and environment, public and private actors, government offices and civic communities, etc.)  In all, it makes an instrumented, interconnected, intelligent and innovative city. FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    32. 32. FUTURE INTELLIGENT CITY: SMART CLOUD PLATFORM + INTERNET OF EVERYTHING The Smart Cloud Platform (IBM or Cisco Powered) www.ibm.com/smartcloud The Urban Internet of Everything is the cloud-networked connection of people, processes, data, and things. PEOPLE (COMMUNITIES, PERSON, ORGANIZATIONS) PROCESS (ACTIVITIES, SERVICES) DATA (INFORMATION, KNOWLEDGE) THINGS (BUILDINGS, MACHINES, DEVICES) The i-City Operation Center is connected with thousands of sensors and cameras spread throughout the cities, as the city brain of the Urban IoE, in which M2M technologies are vital to present intelligent data analytics for core systems and urban processes. Smart City “X” Intelligent Platform is to integrate a technology-centric (smart) level, an intelligent (people-centric) level, and eco-sustainable level improving the Urban Economy, Community Integration, Quality of Life, and overall Sustainability. $14.4 trillion of potential value at stake for the private sector, IoE is a $19 trillion opportunity for businesses and governments globally 2013- 2022. http://internetofeverything.cisco.com/ FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    33. 33. “SECURING SMART CITIES”: CREATING SAFE, RELIABLE AND RESILIENT URBAN COMPLEXES  Cities around the world are becoming smarter by applying new technologies for traffic control, public transport, street lighting, public security, assets management, and urban governance.  The smart city technological and communication environment, the network infrastructure and the Internet of Things, government data and city’s services present vulnerabilities to cyber attacks.  200,000 vulnerable traffic control sensors were installed in Washington DC, New York, Seattle, San Francisco, London, Lyon, Melbourne, and other important cities around the world.  Securing Smart Cities, a new not-for-profit global initiative, was launched in May 2015, involving leading IT security researchers, companies and organizations, as IOActive, Kaspersky Lab, Bastille, and the Cloud Security Alliance.  The Securing Smart Cities initiative aims to solve the cybersecurity risks and challenges through collaboration and information sharing.  The group will serve as a communications node for companies, governments, media outlets, not-for-profit initiatives, and individuals across the world involved in the creation, improvement, and promotion of smart and safe technologies for modern cities: http://securingsmartcities.org.  Keeping Smart Cities Smart. ICIT.  EXECUTIVE REPORT: SMART CITIES. Symantec>>> FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    34. 34. HACKING SMART CITIES: CYBER ATTACKS BY CYBERCRIMINALS AND CYBER TERRORISTS  CYBER SECURITY PROBLEMS affecting cities with real threats and possible cyber attacks that could have a huge negative impact and disruptions:  Lack of Cyber Security Testing  • Poor or Nonexistent Security  • Encryption Issues  • Lack of Computer Emergency Response Teams  • Large and Complex Attack Surfaces  • Patch Deployment Issues  • Insecure Legacy Systems  • Simple Bugs with Huge Impact  • Public Sector Issues  • Lack of Cyber Attack Emergency Plans  • Susceptibility to Denial of Service  • Technology Vendors Who Impede Security Research  RECOMMENDATIONS  Adopt a Cybersecurity framework. Create a simple checklist-type cyber security review. Check for proper encryption, authentication, and authorization and make sure the systems can be easily updated…  Cesar Cerrudo,SECURING SMART CITIES, An Emerging US (and World) Threat: CitiesWide Open to Cyber Attacks.  Cyber war attacks will target city services and complex technical infrastructure run by software inside.  All technologies used by cities plus all the associated cyber security problems, as at the left side, open to possible cyber attacks.  Each new city technology or system creates a new opportunity for cyber attackers.  The key technologies and systems making up the smart city’s complex cyber attacks are:  Traffic Control Systems  • Smart Street Lighting  • City Management Systems  • Sensors  • Public Data  • Mobile Applications  • Cloud and SaaS Solutions  • Smart Grid  • Public Transportation  • Traffic and surveillance cameras  • Social Media  • Location-based Services  • Public Safety systems  Cesar Cerrudo, Keeping Smart Cities Smart. ICIT. FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    35. 35. “SHOW TO THE WORLD THAT YOU ARE A SMART CITY”: SMART SUSTAINABLE CITIES GLOBAL INITIATIVE  “Are you on the right track to become a Smart City? It is said that the future of the world will be decided by the quality of its cities, and it is expected that by 2020 over 40 urban areas will turn into Smart Cities.  However, the Smart Cities Global Initiative is concerned about the large variety of narrow technical visions, models and approaches in which on many occasions “the push towards smart cities is being led by the wrong people – technology companies with naïve visions and short term commercial goals–, while the architects, planners and scientists often struggle to share their specific knowledge”.  That is why this initiative is looking for megacities, municipalities, communities or brand new cities that are following a smart community development strategy aiming to unify all the city systems, services, operations, activities, departments and agencies as a sustainable smart urban ecosystem.  The applications have to provide evidence that the city has potential capacity to take profit of the intelligent resources offered through the Smart Cities Global Initiative. They also have to prove that their transformation into a Smart City has a strong leadership and that it has strong intentions to invest intelligent and financial capital into smart and sustainable urban development.  The selected urban entities will be provided with intelligent property investment as well as sustainable city exclusive education and training.  You can submit your applications via e-mail to Executive Manager of EIS Smart City Global Initiative, at smartcity@cytanet.com.cy. For further information on the Smart Sustainable Cities Global Initiative, consult the online brief guide.”  http://eu-smartcities.eu/content/show-world-you-are-smart-city; http://eu-smartcities.eu/blog/smart-cities-global-initiative  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-cities-benefits; http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-city-commitment  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-cities-global-initiative; http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-city-global-initiative  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/sustainable-city FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    36. 36. THE WORLD CITIES PROJECT CUM THE SMART SUSTAINABLE CITIES GLOBAL INITIATIVE  To advance sustainable urbanization across the globe, we promote combining 3 smart urban initiatives:  the EU’s World Cities project, which aims to promote long-term working relations between cities of the EU and non-EU partner countries.  The Smart Sustainable Cities Global Initiative advanced by the EIP on Smart Cities and Communities Open Market.  The World Bank Partnership for Smart and Sustainable Cities  “World Cities is a project of the Directorate General for Regional and Urban Policy (DG REGIO) of the European Commission in the framework of the European Parliament’s preparatory action to promote the exchange of experience and best practice between the European Union and third countries on the theme of territorial development with particular reference to urban development, urban-rural partnership and urban cross-border cooperation. It involves selecting the pilot cities from such countries as China, India, Japan, Canada, as well as Europe with a view to replicate “the European cities extensive experience in dealing with urbanisation challenges, in developing smart, green, inclusive and mostly attractive cities with a high quality of life”.  Mostly, the initiative is expanding the EU-China smart and green city cooperation.  It is assumed that the Cities of tomorrow have to deal with challenges in an integrated, holistic way by adopting and applying a holistic model of development across different levels and sectors (social, economic, environmental and energy, cultural and political components). Future cities need to adopt an integrated, coherent and holistic approach (across sectors, governance levels and territories) in their vision of the future to strive for and the foresight strategy to get their, unified planning and coordinated development, embracing the social, economic, environmental and territorial dimensions of urban, national and regional development.  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-world-cities-project-smart-sustainable-cities FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    37. 37. “BECOME A SMART NATION TO BUILD YOUR BRAND NAME: SUSTAINABLE NATIONS GLOBAL INITIATIVE  “Have you thought about intelligent global branding? Nowadays, not only companies compete to stand out, but also countries have to struggle for businesses, tourists or international events.  These days, there are 195 independent sovereign states, 60 independent areas and 5 disputed territories and the world is looking for a radical transformation in all ways.  In this context, every nation has its own brand which represents its international image, the way in which it is globally perceived. Intelligent global branding results in attracting investment, facilitating trade and creating internal pride.  The Smart Nations Global Initiative is concerned with the inequality of modern states. For this reason, its main objective is to foster the transition to smart, resilient and inclusive nations.  This initiative aims to become the key driver of an instrumented, interconnected, intelligent, inclusive and innovative world of the future.  If you are committed to contribute to the sustainable development of your nation, country or state, you can submit your applications via e-mail to Dr. Azamat Abdoullaev, Director of EIS Smart Nation Global Initiative, at smartcity@cytanet.com.cy until the 15th of September.”  http://eu-smartcities.eu/content/become-smart-nation-build-your-brand-name  http://eu-smartcities.eu/blog/europe-sustainable-states-commitments  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-nations-global-initiative  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/sustainable-nations-global-initiative  http://eu-smartcities.eu/blog/europe-sustainable-states-commitments-and-smart-nations-franchises  FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    38. 38. CREATING SMART SUSTAINABLE POWERS: EUROPE, CHINA, USA, INDIA, RUSSIA, BRAZIL, ETC.  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/superpowers- smart-states-global-initiative  http://eu-smartcities.eu/blog/smart-superpowers- projects-states-powers-great-powers-and-hyperpowers  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/sustainable- nations-global-initiative-russia  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/sustainable- nations-global-initiative-europe  http://eu-smartcities.eu/content/become-smart- nation-build-your-brand-name FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    39. 39. SMART SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES AT THE SCALE OF TRANSNATIONAL AND NATIONAL COMMUNITIES  Sustainable World, I-WORLD Platform  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-world-27173937  i-Russia (Smart Russia and i-Government)  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/russia-26832583  i-Europe (i-Europe Platform and Smart Big Europe, i-Germany, i-Britain, i-France, i-Italy, i-Spain)  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-europe; https://eu-smartcities.eu/forum/smart-green-europe;  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-green-europe  i-Germany  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/igermany  i-Britain  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/ibritain  i-Cyprus (Smart Cyprus 2013-2020), offered for the national government  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-cyprus-2013-2020  i-America (Smart USA and i-Government)  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-america  i-China (Smart China and i-Government)  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-china  i-Japan (Smart Japan Growth Strategy)  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-japan  FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    40. 40. WHO FOLLOWING OUR SMART AND SUSTAINABLE POLICY FRAMEWORK  Schweiker, Marit,Aims and Goals of Smart Sustainable City Management - Putting Quality of Citizens' LifesFirst, Council of EuropeanMunicipalities andRegions, 5 Oct. 2010.Web. Last accessed 12 Feb. 2014. http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/conferences/od2010/file-upload/2010/docs/39-05A34- Presentation_OD_Smart_Cities_CEMR.pdf  The Partnership for Smart and Sustainable Cities, http://www.urbanknowledge.org/smartsustainablecities.html  FGSSC (2014). Smart sustainable cities – an analysisof definitions. Focus Group on Smart Sustainable Cities Working Group 1, International Telecommunications Union (ITU). http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/focusgroups/ssc/  Hitachi, Smart Sustainable City Overview, Smart Cities: Hitachi, Hitachi,Web. Last accessed 9 Feb. 2014. http://www.hitachi.com/products/smartcity/vision/concept/overview.html  Aoun, Charbel, The Smart Sustainable City Cornerstone: Urban Efficiency, Schneider Electric, Web. Last accessed9 Feb. 2014. http://www2.schneider- electric.com/documents/support/white-papers/smart-cities/998-1185469_smart-city-cornerstone-urban-efficiency.pdf  Telefónica, WhatIs a Smart Sustainable City? Telefónica, Web. Last accessed9 Feb. 2014. http://smartcity-telefonica.com/?p=373  Huawei,Brilliant Life Powered by SmartSustainable City,Huawei Ltd, Web. Last accessed 9 Feb. 2014. http://www.huawei.com/en/about- huawei/publications/communicate/hw-079367.htm  Current Activities For Smart Sustainable Cities,Japan Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications (MIC) Smart Town, ContributionNo. FG-SSC-0033, ITU FocusGroup on Smart Sustainable Cities,Madrid, September 2013. Web. Last accessed 14 Feb 2014. http://ifa.itu.int/t/fg/ssc/docs/1309-Madrid/in/fg-ssc-0033-japan.doc  Homeier, Ina, Smart Sustainable City Wien Initiative, City of Vienna,May 2013. Web. Last accessed 12 Feb. 2014. http://www.impacts.org/euroconference/vienna2013/presentations/Vienna%20impacts%20smart%20city.pdf  Comstock, Maggie, What Is a Smart Sustainable City and How Can a City Boost Its IQ? WorldBank Blogs– Sustainable Cities, 02 April 2012. Web. Lastaccessed12 Feb. 2014.http://blogs.worldbank.org/sustainablecities/what-is-a-smart-city-and-how-can-a-city-boost-its-iq  Smart Sustainable City, BusinessDictionary, Web. Last accessed13 Feb. 2014. http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/smart-city.html  Smart Sustainable Cities & Smart Statistics, Governmentof Italy,ContributionNo. FG-SSC-0014,ITU FocusGroup on Smart Sustainable Cities,Turin,May 2013. Web. Last accessed 14 Feb 2014. http://ifa.itu.int/t/fg/ssc/docs/1305-Turin/in/fg-ssc-0014-Italy.zip  Washburn, Doug,and Sindhu,Usman, HelpingCIOsUnderstand "Smart Sustainable City" Initiatives, FORRESTER. Last Accessed 12 Feb. 2014. http://public.dhe.ibm.com/partnerworld/pub/smb/smarterplanet/forr_help_cios_und_smart_city_initiatives.pdf  Innovative Future of Russia's Cities,Centerfor Smart Sustainable City Innovation – Ernst & Young, Web. Lastaccessed13 Feb. 2014. http://www.ey.com/RU/en/Services/Specialty-Services/Smart-City-Innovation-Center  Woods, Eric, andGartner, John, Smart Sustainable City Suppliers, Navigant Research,2013. Web. Last accessed 13 Feb. 2014. http://www.navigantresearch.com/wp- assets/uploads/2013/07/LB-SCITS-13-Executive-Summary.pdf  Toppeta, Donato, The Smart Sustainable City Vision:How Innovation and ICT Can BuildSmart, "liveable", Sustainable Cities, Think Innovation, Oct.2010. Web. Last accessed 13 Feb. 2014.http://www.thinkinnovation.org/en/portfol/the-smart-city-vision-how-innovation-and-ict-can-build-smart-liveable-sustainable-cities-2-2/  Definition of SmartCities – China Communications Standards Association (CCSA), Smart Sustainable City: terminologiesand definitions,2013, http://www.ccsa.org.cn/workstation/project_disp.php?auto_id=4336 (in Chinese)  Kramers, A., Hojer,M., Lovehagen, N., Wangel, J., Smart Sustainable Cities-Exploring ICTSolutions for reducedenergy use in cities, Environmental Modellingand Software,Issue 56. January 2014. pp. 52-62  Neapolis- SmartEco City. European Prototype for Smart Cities andCommunities. Leptos Group. http://www.neapolis.com  S2CT 2015, International Conference on Smart Sustainable City Technologies, Toronto, Canada, October13–14, 2015; the EuropeanAlliance for Innovation, http://s2ct.org/2015/show/home. FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    41. 41. I-COMMUNITY CONSULTANTS AND DEVELOPERS  Dr Azamat Abdoullaev, Director  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azamat_Abdoullaev  EIS Encyclopedic Intelligent Systems Ltd (EU)  EIS Encyclopedic Intelligent Systems Ltd (Moscow, Russia)  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/eis-ltd Telefax: 357 25 561 883; Phone: + 357 99 683 849;  E-mail: ontopaedia@gmail.com  Internet Sites: http://iiisyla.livejournal.com  ENCYCLOPEDIC INTELLIGENCE/SMART COMPUTING PLATFORM  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/encyclopedic-intelligence  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/encyclopedic-intelligence-24260973  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/encyclopedic-intelligence-global-marketing  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/encyclopedic-intelligence-big-science-and-technology  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/global-intelligence-26413485  INTELLIGENT COMMUNITY AND SMART CITY RESOURCES  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/iworld-25498222; http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/presentations  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smartworl-dabr; http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-cities-28497022  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-cities-27402134 ; http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/urban-europe  Our TOMORROW’S WORLD CITIES PROJECTS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>  FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    42. 42. TOMORROW’S WORLD CITIES: “SUSTAINABLE SMART CITIES” INVESTMENT PLAN IN EUROPE  Promoting Sustainable and Smart Urban Renewal Projects for EFSI Financing  EIS: Sustainable Smart Cities Developments Promoter  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/sustainable-city; http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/urban-europe  Our future urban development consulting services address national, regional and local authorities committed to the sustainable urban, regional and rural development investment policy, looking to finance integrated developments in land and environment, transportation, energy, ICT, water, waste, building and housing, green economy, industry, health, education, safety and security, etc.  We support the EU cities with the conception, design and implementation of integrated sustainable smart urban-rural strategies/action plans. The EU cities are cities from EU 28 Member States, Norway & Switzerland, including city districts and boroughs, municipalities, towns, metropolitan areas and agglomerations.  Smart and Green Cities Integrated Projects are to capitalize on the “Smart Cities & Sustainable Development” Investment Program under the Juncker Investment Plan, the European Fund for Strategic Investments: http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-green-europe  INTRODUCTION: Investment Plan for Europe  The Investment Plan for Europe aims to revive investment in strategic projects around Europe to ensure that money reaches the real economy. This should unlock additional investment of at least EUR 315bn over the next three years. The European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI).  https://eu-smartcities.eu/forum/smart-green-europe; http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/smart-green- europe; http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-world-cities-project-smart-sustainable-cities FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    43. 43. THE WORLD’S CAPITALS PROJECT: A SMART SUSTAINABLE URBAN STRATEGY FOR THE WORLD’S 100 LARGEST URBAN AREAS  To advance and manage sustainable urban development and efficient service delivery, “clear and  credible metrics for cities are essential, including those for basic service delivery, city resilience, GHG emissions and energy intensity”, geography and demography, economy, finances, energy intensity and resource efficiency, climate change vulnerability, infrastructure levels, health indicators, and social equity, as the GCIF Core Indicators were adapted for the following city features:  Economy; Energy; Emissions and pollution; Water, sanitation and waste management; Shelter; Governance; Transportation; Education; Technology and Innovation; Health  As emphasized, “the only path to sustainable development is through sustainable cities, while most of the world’s media and political leadership focus on national and international geopolitical issues: the economic crises in Europe, climate change, the Arab Spring, the “war on terror,” China’s ascendancy.” (World Bank, the Partnership for Sustainable Cities).  The EC and the World Bank are to be proposed to consider the world’s 100 largest urban areas, from Abidjan to Hong Kong to London to Moscow to Rio De Janeiro to Singapore to Yangon as smart sustainable cities pilots under the world future cities project initiative.  To meet the future UN Post-2015 Global Development Goals, succeeding the Millennium Development Goals, The World Capital Cities Project is to combine:  1. The EU’s World Cities project, which aims to promote long-term working relations between cities of the EU and non-EU partner countries.  2. The Smart Sustainable Cities Global Initiative advanced by EIS Ltd and the EIP on Smart Cities and Communities Open Market  3. The World Bank Partnership for Smart and Sustainable Cities. FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015
    44. 44. BIG BUSINESS FOLLOWING SSC POLICY AND PRACTICE  The Smart Cities Council (SCC) envisions a world where digital technology and intelligent design have been harnessed to create smart, sustainable cities with high- quality living and high-quality jobs.  Smart Cities Council includes leading global companies  As Lead Partners:  Allied Telesis, Alstom, Bechtel, Cisco, Cubic Transportation Systems, Enel,  IBM, Itron, MasterCard, Mercedes-Benz, Microsoft, Ooredoo,  Qualcomm, S&C Electric, Schneider Electric, Verizon ...  As Associate Partners:  ABB, Alphinat, Apex CoVantage, Badger Meter, BehaviorMatrix, Bit Stew Systems, Black & Veatch, CH2M, Civic Resource Group, Elster, Enevo, Entrigna, Hutchison Kinrot, Imex Systems, Intel, K2 Geospatial, Neptune Technology Group, OSIsoft, Saudi Telecom, Siemens, Silver Spring Networks, Space-Time Insight, Spire Metering Technology, SunGard Public Sector, The Urban Institute, TROVE, Veolia and West Monroe Partners.  http://www.slideshare.net/ashabook/future-world-cities-project-smart-sustainable-cities FUTURE WORLD CITIES Project Azamat Abdoullaev 2014-2015

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