Attention! Attention! Attention! Dealing with Attention Difficulties in          Young children                   Presente...
Want the More Info???• Facebook:Angela Nelson-Searcy• http://www.facebook.com/people/Angel  a-Nelson-Searcy/10000129580955...
Angela Searcy asearcya@aol.com 708-845-2343•   Angela Searcy M.S., D.T. holds a B.A. degree in English and secondary educa...
List some of The Characteristics of           ADD/ADHD
Brain Stem is Highlighted
It is normal for children to have           less focus!Children          Adults
How Do We Measure Attention         Span?
How do you measure attention              span?• Psychologists vary on what they believe  the “average” attention span of ...
This Sounds Like a Typical Young                child!• It is difficult to diagnose in young children  because it is norma...
Caution! Caution!• The DSM-IV urges clinicians to use  caution when considering an ADHD  diagnosis under certain circumsta...
Red Flags• If a genetic predisposition or siblings with  ADHD/ADD• Excessive crying/difficulty maintaining homeostatsis• D...
More on Bed Wetting• Children with ADHD had a 2.7 times  higher incidence of bedwetting and a 4.5  times higher incidence ...
We have found there to be a direct correlation between…  poor quality sleep and how[children] are able to functionduring t...
Why is movement critical for      attention and learning?• Whole brain functioning• Movement activates attention in young ...
Basic Brain Development
Research shows, adults as well as children, tend to remember 10 percent of what we read, 20 percent of what we hear, 30 pe...
Remember sensory and motoractivities are the key that turn            attention!
Use all 6 Senses!•          Simple Solutions Educational                      Services © 2011
Management Tips• Directions: Tell when before what, and  demonstrate• Identify safety concerns• Use body control rules• En...
Add Smell     • Extracts     • Lotion
Add Touch•   Velcro•   Sand paper•   Salt•   Sand•   Water•   Contact paper stick side up•   Window work•   Felt/fabric•  ...
Let children Discover new things at           Center Time
Add A Sensory• Sand /Dirt/Water/Finger Paint/Foam/Whip  Cream/Shaving Cream/Sand Paper• Make Letters with Wood chips or sc...
Add Movement
Materials to Add!Story blocksWord blocksBall tossBubble wrapjumpSound jumpLetter Jump
ABC PATHWAYS MAT Make your letters by  moving your fingers  around the pathways Move objects (like  Matchbox cars) aroun...
JUMP ROPE LETTERS Make the shape of the letter with your  jump rope on the floor Add a jump rope to help create the  let...
MOVE CUBES Fill in the slots with words, letters,  exercises, verbs, adjectives, parts of  speech, body parts, movements,...
Change HOW children Move!
Read Story While children Act it            Out           Simple Solutions Educational                       Services © 2011
Simple Solutions Educational            Services © 2011
Lifeprint.com   More Simple Solutions Educational             Services © 2011
More Ideas!•   Bass Toss Q and A•   Sensory webs•   Musical chairs Q and A•   Syllable “Duck Duck Goose”•   Syllable “Moth...
Sight
“If I can’t picture it, I can’tunderstand it.”               Albert               Einstein
See sounds!
Circle Time  Simplify the ActivityFrom: www.headstartinclusion.org
3 Before Me                         1. Think to myself                    2. Check the direction chart.                   ...
Right Way/Wrong Way
Simple Solutions Support!        Simple Solutions Educational                    Services © 2011
Choosing the Right                           Text•• When teaching young readers how to visualize, it is important to  choo...
• Try using a blank piece of drawing paper and  encourage your students to organize their thinking  in their own unique wa...
Directions:• Listen as I read ___________________.• Write about what you see as you hear the  story.• Use illustrations, w...
How to do this…• You’ll want to pause and give students enough time to get  their visualizations down on paper.• Stop at p...
Justin• Justin is four years old. He is very quiet gentle child. He sits  quietly during circle time and story time. It so...
Ask yourself…• Does Justin have a normal attention  span? Why or why not?• Does Justin show any warning signs of  ADD/ADHD...
Joanna• Joanna is 2.6 years old. She is always on the go! She goes  from center to center during free play. She does sit a...
Ask yourself…• Does Joanna have a normal attention  span? Why or why not?• Does Joanna show any warning signs of  ADD/ADHD...
Management Tips• Rule of thumb: more students on task, less  behavior problems• Do not hand out equipment until directions...
Need Training or a Key Note?• We provide on-site training, consultation  or teleconferences/webinars!          Simple Solu...
Simple Solutions Classroom Kit!
MORE RESOURCES: “North Carolina Classroom Energizers” by  Activity Promotion Laboratory & East Carolina  University Schoo...
 “Learning with the Brain in Mind” by Eric  Jensen. Go to www.jlcbrain.com “Thinking on Your Feet” by Jean Blaydes-  Mad...
ReferencesGardner, H., & Hatch, T. (1989). Multiple intelligences go to school:Educational implications of the theory of m...
Ada s. handout 2012
Ada s. handout 2012
Ada s. handout 2012
Ada s. handout 2012
Ada s. handout 2012
Ada s. handout 2012
Ada s. handout 2012
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Ada s. handout 2012

  1. 1. Attention! Attention! Attention! Dealing with Attention Difficulties in Young children Presented by Angela Searcy, M.S. and Lyn Sumerset Simple Solutions Educational Services www.overtherainbowsimplesolutions.com asearcya@aol.com 708-845-2343/866-660-3899
  2. 2. Want the More Info???• Facebook:Angela Nelson-Searcy• http://www.facebook.com/people/Angel a-Nelson-Searcy/100001295809551• Linkedin: AngelaSearcy, M.S.• http://www.linkedin.com/in/angelasearcy
  3. 3. Angela Searcy asearcya@aol.com 708-845-2343• Angela Searcy M.S., D.T. holds a B.A. degree in English and secondary education with teacher certification though the state of Illinois and a M.S. degree in early childhood development from Erikson Institute, with a specialization in Infant Studies and a credential in developmental therapy. Angela is a Diversifying in Higher Education in Illinois Fellow at Argosy University in the Doctor of Education Program• Angela is the owner and founder of Simple Solutions Educational Services, has over 20 years of experience in the field of education, is an approved professional development provider by the Illinois State Board of Education, and Texas ECI. She acts as an educational consultant for the Multisensory Training Institute (MTI) in Needham, MA, Lakeshore Learning, Carson CA and Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) at Vanderbilt University. Angela is also a professor at Rasmussen College and a PDI coach with the Ounce of Prevention• A former associate at the Neuropsychology Diagnostic Center in Orland Park, Illinois, Angela has specialized training in the neurosciences and is a nationally recognized speaker with extensive experience working with professionals, young children, and their families as an early childhood teacher, child development specialist, staff developer, mental health consultant, parent educator, language arts teacher, college professor and tutor. Her expertise encompasses developing behavior modification programs from a neuropsychological perspective, and creating professional development grounded in neuroscience research related to adult learning.• She has been featured on Chicago Public Radio’s Chicago Matters, Chicago Parent and Chicago Baby Magazines and is a regular speaker for the Learning and the Brain
  4. 4. List some of The Characteristics of ADD/ADHD
  5. 5. Brain Stem is Highlighted
  6. 6. It is normal for children to have less focus!Children Adults
  7. 7. How Do We Measure Attention Span?
  8. 8. How do you measure attention span?• Psychologists vary on what they believe the “average” attention span of a child may be. Most agree that the child’s age plus two minutes is the average. That means most kindergarteners (most are five years old) have a five to seven- minute attention span. This means the teacher/therapist should rotate activities (not the topic) every 5-7 minutes!
  9. 9. This Sounds Like a Typical Young child!• It is difficult to diagnose in young children because it is normal for activity levels to increase each year until the age of three.• In order to diagnosis ADHD/ADD it must be maladaptive and inconsistent with normal child development
  10. 10. Caution! Caution!• The DSM-IV urges clinicians to use caution when considering an ADHD diagnosis under certain circumstances. The manual notes, for example, that it is difficult to diagnose ADHD in children who are younger than 4 or 5 years of age because the variability in normal behavior for toddlers is much greater than that of older children
  11. 11. Red Flags• If a genetic predisposition or siblings with ADHD/ADD• Excessive crying/difficulty maintaining homeostatsis• Difficulties to be soothed—several techniques do not consistently soothe this child /Self regulation• Hypersensitivity to sensory stimulation• Feeding problems, irregular eating• Sleep disturbances / Nocturnal enuresis/Bed-wetting
  12. 12. More on Bed Wetting• Children with ADHD had a 2.7 times higher incidence of bedwetting and a 4.5 times higher incidence of daytime wetting. Southern Medical Journal• A history of bedwetting is a very strong clue to the diagnosis of ADD/ADHD. (Dr. Monroe Gross, M.D., ADD Medical Treatment Center)
  13. 13. We have found there to be a direct correlation between… poor quality sleep and how[children] are able to functionduring the day. Often we see signs of ADD or ADHD as a result of this compromise.” International Childrens Continence Society (ICCS)
  14. 14. Why is movement critical for attention and learning?• Whole brain functioning• Movement activates attention in young learners• Movement stimulates the release of neurotransmitters in the brain• The cerebellum or small brain is critical for learning
  15. 15. Basic Brain Development
  16. 16. Research shows, adults as well as children, tend to remember 10 percent of what we read, 20 percent of what we hear, 30 percent of what we see, 50 percent of what we hear and see, 70 percent of what we say, and 90 percent of what we say and do. Learning happens through interactive, real-life, task centered, self- directed activities Hearing words Looking at Pictures Watching a Movie Looking at an Exhibit Watching a Demonstration Seeing it Done on Location Participating in a Discussion Giving a Talk Doing a Dramatic Presentation Simulating the Real Experience Doing the Real Thing ( Authentic Assessment/Activity Centers) (Malcolm Knowles, 1990)
  17. 17. Remember sensory and motoractivities are the key that turn attention!
  18. 18. Use all 6 Senses!• Simple Solutions Educational Services © 2011
  19. 19. Management Tips• Directions: Tell when before what, and demonstrate• Identify safety concerns• Use body control rules• Enforce boundaries• Think about how this activity would work best( large or small group?) ( how would you adapt to fit your space?)
  20. 20. Add Smell • Extracts • Lotion
  21. 21. Add Touch• Velcro• Sand paper• Salt• Sand• Water• Contact paper stick side up• Window work• Felt/fabric• Wood
  22. 22. Let children Discover new things at Center Time
  23. 23. Add A Sensory• Sand /Dirt/Water/Finger Paint/Foam/Whip Cream/Shaving Cream/Sand Paper• Make Letters with Wood chips or scraps• Make letters with light bright or overhead projector• Do Centers Outside!• Ice letters, numbers, shapes• Use manipulates to make sentences—squares are nouns, circles are verbs, triangles are adjectives.
  24. 24. Add Movement
  25. 25. Materials to Add!Story blocksWord blocksBall tossBubble wrapjumpSound jumpLetter Jump
  26. 26. ABC PATHWAYS MAT Make your letters by moving your fingers around the pathways Move objects (like Matchbox cars) around the “racetrack” and create letters Copyrighted and sold by Jean Blaydes-Madigan Walk around the mat to at create letters www.actionlearning.com
  27. 27. JUMP ROPE LETTERS Make the shape of the letter with your jump rope on the floor Add a jump rope to help create the letter Create a word with multiple jump ropes Add a partner to help! Perform a locomotor movement around the jump rope
  28. 28. MOVE CUBES Fill in the slots with words, letters, exercises, verbs, adjectives, parts of speech, body parts, movements, word chunks, expression…anything! Roll the cube. Do whatever the cube landed on. Combine more than one cube. Use for story starters, math operations, poems, images, etc.
  29. 29. Change HOW children Move!
  30. 30. Read Story While children Act it Out Simple Solutions Educational Services © 2011
  31. 31. Simple Solutions Educational Services © 2011
  32. 32. Lifeprint.com More Simple Solutions Educational Services © 2011
  33. 33. More Ideas!• Bass Toss Q and A• Sensory webs• Musical chairs Q and A• Syllable “Duck Duck Goose”• Syllable “Mother May I”• Story Blocks• Story Maps• Red, Yellow and Green light Q and A• Hula Hoop/Tangle toys Q and A• Shape sentences!• Obstacle course Q and A
  34. 34. Sight
  35. 35. “If I can’t picture it, I can’tunderstand it.” Albert Einstein
  36. 36. See sounds!
  37. 37. Circle Time Simplify the ActivityFrom: www.headstartinclusion.org
  38. 38. 3 Before Me 1. Think to myself 2. Check the direction chart. 3. Ask a Classmate If you still need help clip your name to the chart for teacher help.In order to minimize interruptions during small group guided reading, children will need to know what to do if they need help. This technique is something I learned at an inservice I attended and it has worked well. Not only does it allow me time to work with my small groups, but it also makes students accountable for their learning.
  39. 39. Right Way/Wrong Way
  40. 40. Simple Solutions Support! Simple Solutions Educational Services © 2011
  41. 41. Choosing the Right Text•• When teaching young readers how to visualize, it is important to choose the right text. There are many incredible authors out there who have the art of creating pictures in a reader’s mind down to a science. Be sure to choose a text that is full of descriptive language.• Inspired by the season and the calming mood that is created by this story, I chose to use Cynthia Rylant’s Scarecrow to teach a diverse group of 4th graders how to visualize. It is important to prepare for possible "bumps in the road" before reading any book with your students. When planning out your lesson, read over the text beforehand and be prepared to pause at certain places to provide the appropriate scaffolding to meet the diverse needs of your students.
  42. 42. • Try using a blank piece of drawing paper and encourage your students to organize their thinking in their own unique way. Youll find that some students may create one large illustration and add details as they go while others will divide the paper into sections, creating new scenes as they listen to the details in the book. It is interesting to see how each student organizes the pictures created in their mind in their own special way.
  43. 43. Directions:• Listen as I read ___________________.• Write about what you see as you hear the story.• Use illustrations, words, phrases, or sentences — or combine them all!• Draw and write as YOU see it in your mind. There are no right or wrong answers. Just fill up the paper as you visualize the story.
  44. 44. How to do this…• You’ll want to pause and give students enough time to get their visualizations down on paper.• Stop at planned points to clarify difficult vocabulary and check for understanding. In addition, there may be parts of the text you need to reread to the students, giving them time to develop a clearer sense of what the author is encouraging them to picture in their minds.• Remember — during this first reading of the story, refrain from showing your students any of the beautiful illustrations that may grace the pages. You want students to create their own mental images without any bias.
  45. 45. Justin• Justin is four years old. He is very quiet gentle child. He sits quietly during circle time and story time. It sometimes feels as if Justin is not even in the class he can be so good! Justin’s mom says he is an angel at home –he plays alone or watches TV for hours. Justin can be “clingy” when going to sleep. His mother says he has a hard time going to sleep at home ---but his mother appears “young” to you and this is her first child. Justin is a picky eater at school and his mother says he only eats five foods at home –chicken nuggets, macaroni and cheese, apple sauce, cheese and bread. You have been his teacher for the last five months and you think he needs to eat more at school –you think that at home his mother just babies him. The infant, and toddler rooms all said Justin appeared a bit “spoiled” and his mother gave him baby food until he was almost two and used to puree his food even at 18 months –.
  46. 46. Ask yourself…• Does Justin have a normal attention span? Why or why not?• Does Justin show any warning signs of ADD/ADHD? Why or why not?
  47. 47. Joanna• Joanna is 2.6 years old. She is always on the go! She goes from center to center during free play. She does sit and do an art project for about 5 minutes –but is off again soon! She sees the blocks and throws them. She then gets in the basket that the blocks are put in and goes “zoom!zoom!” The teacher tells her that is for the blocks not her—she leaves soon after. Joanna eats well and sleeps well. Joanna’s mother says she is “hyper at home” She says she won’t even watch TV –she watches TV just for a few minutes then is off to something else! She breaks her toys and takes them a part—sometimes she can piece them back together sometimes not—she is very “destructive” according to his mother. Joanna tells her she wants to see how the toys work. Joanna will play with blocks occasionally or occasionally do an art project for 4 or 5 minutes
  48. 48. Ask yourself…• Does Joanna have a normal attention span? Why or why not?• Does Joanna show any warning signs of ADD/ADHD? Why or why not?• What strategies would you use to help Joanna in your classroom and not wander?
  49. 49. Management Tips• Rule of thumb: more students on task, less behavior problems• Do not hand out equipment until directions are over, or keep equipment “hidden” until “GO”• TEACH children with stories and puppets on how to behave during activities• Use short transition times (plan ahead) Transitions should be planned –and include active engagement
  50. 50. Need Training or a Key Note?• We provide on-site training, consultation or teleconferences/webinars! Simple Solutions Educational Services asearcya@aol.com 708-845-2343/866-660-3899
  51. 51. Simple Solutions Classroom Kit!
  52. 52. MORE RESOURCES: “North Carolina Classroom Energizers” by Activity Promotion Laboratory & East Carolina University School of Health and Human Performance at www.beactivenc.org “Brain Gym” (1989). Paul & Gail Dennison. Ventura, CA: Edu-Kinesthetics, Inc Exercises & Materials at www.braingym.org PE Central Integrated Activities Ideas www.pecentral.org/lessonideas/classroom/ classroom.asp
  53. 53.  “Learning with the Brain in Mind” by Eric Jensen. Go to www.jlcbrain.com “Thinking on Your Feet” by Jean Blaydes- Madigan and “Action Learning” at www.actionbasedlearning.com “Interdisciplinary Teaching Through Physical Education” by Theresa Purcell Cone. Order through www.humankinetics.com
  54. 54. ReferencesGardner, H., & Hatch, T. (1989). Multiple intelligences go to school:Educational implications of the theory of multiple intelligences.Educational Researcher, 18(8), 4-9.)“The Treasure at the Bottom of the Brain” by Henrietta C. Leiner andAlan L. Leiner, September 1997.Berninger, V., & Richards, T. (2002) Brain literacy for educators andpsychologists. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of mid: The theory of multiple intelligences.New York: Basic Books.Sylwester, Robert. (2005) How to Explain A Brain The EducatorsHandbook of Brain Terms and Cognitive Processes CA: Corwin Press.Websiteswww.brainconnection.comwww.brainland.comwww.epuh.org/cm/home_htmhttp://cognet.mit.eduwww.neuroguide.com

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