On The Waterfront

1,029 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,029
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
13
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • On The Waterfront

    1. 1. Identify the following in each of the five presented clips: Next time: March 1 Film title: Midterm Exam Major character(s) depicted: In addition analyze each clip from each of the following perspectives: Narrative: Character Development: Theme: Motifs and symbols: 12 points each + 4 photo identifications worth 10 points each (ID name and contributions to film as we have discussed)
    2. 2. - How would you define “The American Dream” as it relates to you.
    3. 3. - How would you define “The American Dream” as it relates to you.
    4. 4. -- Consider the treatment of “The American Dream” as portrayed in Citizen Kane, The Grapes of Wrath, and American Beauty. Consider any parallels found in Charles Foster Kane, Tom Joad, and Lester Burnham. Consider the contrasts. Be ready to discuss and present next time.
    5. 5. 1954
    6. 6. (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) Received Academy Award for On The Waterfront Elia Kazan Director
    7. 7. born March 27, 1914 Received Academy Award for On The Waterfront Budd Schulberg Screenwiter
    8. 8. HUACC The House Committee on Un-American Activities
    9. 9. HUACC The House Committee on Un-American Activities
    10. 10. •Both Schulberg and Kazan were called before the House Un-American Activities Committee. •Both had participated activities of the communist party as young men. •Both “named names” •This caused difficulties for both men. •Kazan was particularly shunned by many of his former associates including Arthur Miller. •Kazan believed his actions were justified- •Many draw parallels between Kazanʼs HUAC testimony and the hearing appearance of Terry Malloy in On The Waterfront. •“...it was in the best interest of the country and his own liberal beliefs to cooperate with HUAC's anti- communist efforts in order to counter Communists in Hollywood who were co-opting the liberal agenda.”
    11. 11. On the Waterfront was based on a 24-part series of articles in the New York Sun by Malcolm Johnson, "Crime on the Waterfront." The series won the 1949 Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting. The stories detailed widespread corruption, extortion and racketeering on the waterfront of Manhattan and Brooklyn.
    12. 12. The film deals with social issues, such as poverty and homelessness, which paralleled the emerging organization of labor. ........about mob violence and corruption among longshoremen Terry Malloy ....a washed-up ex-prizefighter. ....working on the docks for the local gang boss. .....filled with terrible guilt, because of his involvement,
    13. 13. Huge panorama of the “docks” and its impact, contrasted by the few men emerging from the small house “You take it from here, slugger.” “Joey!”
    14. 14. Huge panorama of the “docks” and its impact, contrasted by the few men emerging from the small house “You take it from here, slugger.” “Joey!”
    15. 15. Terry has just questioned his role in Joey Doyle’s murder Scene sharpens relationship between Terry and “Uncle Johnny” Friendly Brother Charley encouraging Terry’s gratefulness to Friendly
    16. 16. Terry has just questioned his role in Joey Doyle’s murder Scene sharpens relationship between Terry and “Uncle Johnny” Friendly Brother Charley encouraging Terry’s gratefulness to Friendly
    17. 17. D&D Shooting in Hoboken, NJ Dock boss manipulation and control
    18. 18. D&D Shooting in Hoboken, NJ Dock boss manipulation and control
    19. 19. Church aftermath The playground-talking of Danger of the street- childhood- safe haven amid corruption and The glove despair Another side of Terry begins to emerge-
    20. 20. Church aftermath The playground-talking of Danger of the street- childhood- safe haven amid corruption and The glove despair Another side of Terry begins to emerge-
    21. 21. Young boy is Terry before corruption. Edie is seeing “the good” in Terry. Edie’s mention of her brother’s pigeons- Terry’s reaction Terry’s tenderness with pigeons. Pigeon egg. The roof.........escape from the docks.
    22. 22. Young boy is Terry before corruption. Edie is seeing “the good” in Terry. Edie’s mention of her brother’s pigeons- Terry’s reaction Terry’s tenderness with pigeons. Pigeon egg. The roof.........escape from the docks.
    23. 23. What help is she asking of him? Pivotal change in Terry Malloy Subpoena follows.
    24. 24. What help is she asking of him? Pivotal change in Terry Malloy Subpoena follows.
    25. 25. Father Barry
    26. 26. Father Barry
    27. 27. “It was you, Charlie.” Two good actors at the top of their game. affection pain emotional turmoil
    28. 28. “It was you, Charlie.” Two good actors at the top of their game. affection pain emotional turmoil
    29. 29. After the hearing..... • unexpected reception • Kazan parallel
    30. 30. After the hearing..... • unexpected reception • Kazan parallel
    31. 31. Redemption
    32. 32. Redemption
    33. 33. Explain the lines on face value. How do the lines help define the character(s) Explain any impact this scene has on the characters’ evolution. What impact does this scene have on the film as a whole. Do you believe this film is relevant today? Why/ why not. If group is split, present both sides. Edie Doyle: Shouldn't everybody care about everybody else? Terry Malloy: Boy, what a fruitcake you are. Edie Doyle: I mean, isn't everybody a part of everybody else? Terry Malloy: And you really believe that drool? Edie Doyle: Yes, I do. Terry Malloy: You wanna hear my philosophy of life? Do it to him before he does it to you. Edie Doyle: I never met anyone like you. There's not a spark of sentiment or romance or human kindness in your whole body. Terry Malloy: What good does it do ya besides get ya in trouble?
    34. 34. Terry Malloy: You know, if I spill, my life ain't worth a nickel. Father Barry: And how much is your soul worth if you don't? Listen, if I were you, I would walk right. Never mind. I'm not asking you to do anything. It's your own conscience that's got to do the asking. Explain the lines on face value. How do the lines help define the character(s) Explain any impact this scene has on the characters’ evolution. What impact does this scene have on the film as a whole. Do you believe this film is relevant today? Why/ why not. If group is split, present both sides.
    35. 35. Charlie: Look, kid, I - how much you weigh, son? When you weighed one hundred and sixty-eight pounds you were beautiful. You coulda been another Billy Conn, and that skunk we got you for a manager, he brought you along too fast. Terry: It wasn't him, Charley, it was you. Remember that night in the Garden you came down to my dressing room and you said, "Kid, this ain't your night. We're going for the price on Wilson." You remember that? "This ain't your night"! My night! I coulda taken Wilson apart! So what happens? He gets the title shot outdoors on the ballpark and what do I get? A one-way ticket to Palooka-ville! You was my brother, Charley, you shoulda looked out for me a little bit. You shoulda taken care of me just a little bit so I wouldn't have to take them dives for the short- end money. Charlie: Oh I had some bets down for you. You saw some money. Terry: You don't understand. I coulda had class. I coulda been a contender. I coulda been somebody, instead of a bum, which is what I am, let's face it. It was you, Charley. Explain the lines on face value. How do the lines help define the character(s) Explain any impact this scene has on the characters’ evolution. What impact does this scene have on the film as a whole. Do you believe this film is relevant today? Why/ why not. If group is split, present both sides.
    36. 36. Johnny Friendly: When I was sixteen, I had to beg for work in the hold. I didn't work my way up out of there for nothing. You know, taking over this local took a little doin'. There's some pretty rough fellas in the way. They gave me this to remember them by. I got two thousand dues paying members in this local - that's $72,000 a year legitimate and when each one of 'em puts in a couple of bucks a day just to make sure they work steady, well, you figure it out. And that's just for openers. We got the fattest piers in the fattest harbor in the world. Everything moves in and out, we take our cut. You don't suppose I can afford to be boxed out of a deal like this, do ya? A deal I sweated and bled Explain the lines on face value. for, on account of one lousy little How do the lines help define the character(s) cheese-eater, that Doyle bum, who Explain any impact this scene has on the thinks he can go squealing to the Crime characters’ evolution. Commission? Do ya? Well, do ya? What impact does this scene have on the film as a whole. Do you believe this film is relevant today? Why/ why not. If group is split, present both sides.
    37. 37. Father Barry: Some people think the Crucifixion only took place on Calvary. They better wise up. Taking Joey Doyle's life to stop him from testifying is a crucifixion. And dropping a sling on Kayo Dugan because he was ready to spill his guts tomorrow, that's a crucifixion. And every time the mob puts the crusher on a good man, tries to stop him from doing his duty as a citizen, it's a crucifixion. And anybody who sits around and lets it happen, keeps silent about something he knows has happened, shares the guilt of it just as much as the Roman soldier who pierced the flesh of Our Lord to see if He was dead. Explain the lines on face value. How do the lines help define the character(s) Explain any impact this scene has on the characters’ evolution. What impact does this scene have on the film as a whole. Do you believe this film is relevant today? Why/ why not. If group is split, present both sides.
    38. 38. Terry Malloy: You think you're God Almighty, but you know what you are? You're a cheap, lousy, dirty, stinking mug! And I'm glad what I done to you, ya hear that? I'm glad what I done! Explain the lines on face value. How do the lines help define the character(s) Explain any impact this scene has on the characters’ evolution. What impact does this scene have on the film as a whole. Do you believe this film is relevant today? Why/ why not. If group is split, present both sides.
    39. 39. Mr. Smith Goes To Washington 1939

    ×