Kane Keynote Copy 2

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Notes on the Orson Welles Film

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Kane Keynote Copy 2

  1. 1. For next time: 2/8 View The Grapes of Wrath Take Chapter I Quiz on textbook DVD. Email me the results- ascurato@gmail.com No CD? Answer # 3 on p. 18. as it applies to Citizen Kane. Email your answer to me. Read Chapter 2- Thematic Elements p. 20 Choose Maker/Shaker for your report. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  2. 2. The American Dream Saturday, January 30, 2010
  3. 3. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  4. 4. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  5. 5. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  6. 6. The Real Life Cast Of Characters Saturday, January 30, 2010
  7. 7. Orson Welles Birth name George Orson Welles Born May 6, 1915 Kenosha, Wisconsin, U.S. Died October 10, 1985 (aged 70) Los Angeles, California, U.S. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  8. 8. Orson Welles Birth name George Orson Welles Born May 6, 1915 Kenosha, Wisconsin, U.S. Died October 10, 1985 (aged 70) Los Angeles, California, U.S. Welles had been considered a “boy genius” at everything he tried—painting, writing, acting. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  9. 9. Orson Welles Birth name George Orson Welles Born May 6, 1915 Kenosha, Wisconsin, U.S. Died October 10, 1985 (aged 70) Los Angeles, California, U.S. Welles had been considered a “boy genius” at everything he tried—painting, writing, acting. In New York, he acted, directed, and wrote. He became well-known for his work in the Federal Theater Project, especially a version of Macbeth done entirely by black actors. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  10. 10. Orson Welles Birth name George Orson Welles Born May 6, 1915 Kenosha, Wisconsin, U.S. Died October 10, 1985 (aged 70) Los Angeles, California, U.S. Welles had been considered a “boy genius” at everything he tried—painting, writing, acting. In New York, he acted, directed, and wrote. He became well-known for his work in the Federal Theater Project, especially a version of Macbeth done entirely by black actors. He also did work in radio. He was most well-known for Mercury Theater and especially “The War of the Worlds.” Saturday, January 30, 2010
  11. 11. outro: “....listeners across the country panicked.” Saturday, January 30, 2010
  12. 12. outro: “....listeners across the country panicked.” Saturday, January 30, 2010
  13. 13. The attention Welles received from this broadcast accelerated his recruitment to Hollywood and film- making Saturday, January 30, 2010
  14. 14. William Randolph Hearst (16 April 1863 – 14 August 1951) ......a leading newspaper publisher. ............."yellow journalism"--sensationalized stories of dubious veracity. ...........was elected three times to the U.S. House of Representatives, .........was defeated in 1906 in a race for governor of New York Saturday, January 30, 2010
  15. 15. William Randolph Hearst (16 April 1863 – 14 August 1951) ......a leading newspaper publisher. ............."yellow journalism"--sensationalized stories of dubious veracity. ...........was elected three times to the U.S. House of Representatives, .........was defeated in 1906 in a race for governor of New York ....... became involved in an affair with popular film actress and comedienne Marion Davies (1897– 1961), and from about 1919, he lived openly with her in California. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  16. 16. William Randolph Hearst (16 April 1863 – 14 August 1951) ......a leading newspaper publisher. ............."yellow journalism"--sensationalized stories of dubious veracity. ...........was elected three times to the U.S. House of Representatives, .........was defeated in 1906 in a race for governor of New York ....... became involved in an affair with popular film actress and comedienne Marion Davies (1897– 1961), and from about 1919, he lived openly with her in California. Beginning in 1919, Hearst began to construct (and never completed) a spectacular castle on a 240,000 acre ranch at San Simeon, California, which he furnished with antiques, art, and entire rooms brought from the great houses of Europe. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  17. 17. William Randolph Hearst (16 April 1863 – 14 August 1951) ......a leading newspaper publisher. ............."yellow journalism"--sensationalized stories of dubious veracity. ...........was elected three times to the U.S. House of Representatives, .........was defeated in 1906 in a race for governor of New York ....... became involved in an affair with popular film actress and comedienne Marion Davies (1897– 1961), and from about 1919, he lived openly with her in California. Beginning in 1919, Hearst began to construct (and never completed) a spectacular castle on a 240,000 acre ranch at San Simeon, California, which he furnished with antiques, art, and entire rooms brought from the great houses of Europe. .........used all his resources and influence in an unsuccessful attempt to prevent the release of Citizen Kane. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  18. 18. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  19. 19. Marion Davies (1897–1961) Considered by many to be a talented actress and comedienne. Her talent was perceived as secondary to the fact that she was Hearstʼs mistress. Hearst formed Cosmopolitan Pictures solely to produce starring vehicles for her. His relentless efforts to promote her career instead had a detrimental effect. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  20. 20. Marion Davies (1897–1961) Considered by many to be a talented actress and comedienne. Her talent was perceived as secondary to the fact that she was Hearstʼs mistress. Hearst formed Cosmopolitan Pictures solely to produce starring vehicles for her. His relentless efforts to promote her career instead had a detrimental effect. Her career was often overshadowed by her relationship with the married Hearst and their fabulous social life at San Simeon. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  21. 21. Marion Davies (1897–1961) Considered by many to be a talented actress and comedienne. Her talent was perceived as secondary to the fact that she was Hearstʼs mistress. Hearst formed Cosmopolitan Pictures solely to produce starring vehicles for her. His relentless efforts to promote her career instead had a detrimental effect. Her career was often overshadowed by her relationship with the married Hearst and their fabulous social life at San Simeon. It was perceived the character of Susan Alexander in Citizen Kane was most offensive to Hearst as it insulted Daviesʼ as a person and as an actress. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  22. 22. Herman J. Mankiewicz (November 7, 1897 in New York City—March 5, 1953 in Hollywood, California) ........ legendary Hollywood screenwriter ..........a one time social acquaintance of William Randolph Hearst ........best known for his collaboration with Orson Welles on the screenplay of Citizen Kane, for which they both won an Academy Award and later became a source of controversy over who wrote what. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  23. 23. Gregg Toland (May 29, 1904 - September 26, 1948) ..........a highly influential American cinematographer noted for his innovative use of lighting and techniques such as deep focus: Saturday, January 30, 2010
  24. 24. Gregg Toland (May 29, 1904 - September 26, 1948) ..........a highly influential American cinematographer noted for his innovative use of lighting and techniques such as deep focus: (...a photographic and cinematographic technique incorporating a large depth of field. Depth of field is the front-to-back range of focus in an image — that is, how much of it appears sharp and clear. Consequently, in deep focus the foreground, middle-ground and background are all in focus.) Saturday, January 30, 2010
  25. 25. Gregg Toland (May 29, 1904 - September 26, 1948) ..........a highly influential American cinematographer noted for his innovative use of lighting and techniques such as deep focus: (...a photographic and cinematographic technique incorporating a large depth of field. Depth of field is the front-to-back range of focus in an image — that is, how much of it appears sharp and clear. Consequently, in deep focus the foreground, middle-ground and background are all in focus.) During the 1930s, Toland became the youngest cameraman in Hollywood but soon one of its most sought-after cinematographers. Over a seven-year span (1936–1942), he was nominated five times for the "Best Cinematography" Oscar, including a win in 1940 for his work on Wuthering Heights. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  26. 26. Citizen Kane (1941) is widely considered to be one of the greatest films of all time. •groundbreaking camera techniques •innovative narrative devices •inspiration and influence it had and continues to have on other films. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  27. 27. The most defining stylistic element of Citizen Kane is the lighting. Welles meant for it to be a dark picture, unlike anything that had been filmed up to that time, so he used single source lighting. The object was to make the lighting seem less artificial, but also to use simple lighting devices in order to give the scene a certain ambience, and in some instances to further develop the characters with the use of shadows. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  28. 28. Low angle shot * a 20th-century avant-garde movement in art and literature that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious mind, for example by the irrational juxtaposition of images. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  29. 29. Low angle shot * a 20th-century avant-garde movement in art and literature that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious mind, for example by the irrational juxtaposition of images. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  30. 30. Low angle shot Shows the details (ceilings etc.) and combines the realism with a sense of surrealism* in the environment * a 20th-century avant-garde movement in art and literature that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious mind, for example by the irrational juxtaposition of images. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  31. 31. Low angle shot Shows the details (ceilings etc.) and combines the realism with a sense of surrealism* in the environment Also contributes to character....showing Kane as vulnerable and isolated-- * a 20th-century avant-garde movement in art and literature that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious mind, for example by the irrational juxtaposition of images. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  32. 32. Camera draws closer to the window of Globe introduced as running imagery Xanadu. The window stays in the Opening title- had never been done before. Snow introduced as running imagery same place but it gets closer as we pass many of the items that will be The nurse is seen in the broken glass of mentioned in the newsreel to come snow globe. “No Trespassing” The camera and the viewer ignore the sign. Image fades on same lit window Kane's lips say, "Rosebud." Saturday, January 30, 2010
  33. 33. Camera draws closer to the window of Globe introduced as running imagery Xanadu. The window stays in the Opening title- had never been done before. Snow introduced as running imagery same place but it gets closer as we pass many of the items that will be The nurse is seen in the broken glass of mentioned in the newsreel to come snow globe. “No Trespassing” The camera and the viewer ignore the sign. Image fades on same lit window Kane's lips say, "Rosebud." Saturday, January 30, 2010
  34. 34. The most defining stylistic element of Citizen Kane is the lighting. Welles meant for it to be a dark picture, unlike anything that had been filmed up to that time, so he used single source lighting. The object was to make the lighting seem less artificial, but also to use simple lighting devices in order to give the scene a certain ambience, and in some instances to further develop the characters with the use of shadows. News On The March Single source lighting A take on Time Magazine’s The March of Time Backward flashback obituary Saturday, January 30, 2010
  35. 35. Single source lighting Saturday, January 30, 2010
  36. 36. The characters are indistinct, at best a silhouette. Single source lighting Saturday, January 30, 2010
  37. 37. The characters are indistinct, at best a silhouette. The reporters are not primary characters. Even Thompson -- who through his pursuit of Rosebud is the catalyst for the rest film -- is not important enough to light Single source lighting adequately. This is restated by his not being photographed directly throughout the rest of the film, until the very end when he essentially gives up on his pursuit of Rosebud. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  38. 38. The characters are indistinct, at best a silhouette. The reporters are not primary characters. Even Thompson -- who through his pursuit of Rosebud is the catalyst for the rest film -- is not important enough to light Single source lighting adequately. This is restated by his not being photographed directly throughout the rest of the film, until the very end when he essentially gives up on his pursuit of Rosebud. The way this scene is lit also says something about the filmmaker's view on members of the media. In many ways, the film is a condemnation of the media, with Hearst being its primary target. By casting all of the reporters in shadow, Welles diminishes their overall importance, not just as characters, but also as an institution. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  39. 39. Use of Shadows....Declaration of Principles Saturday, January 30, 2010
  40. 40. Use of Shadows....Declaration of Principles Shadow is used to express the ethical value of a character; they cast doubt on a character's integrity, or by the absence of shadow, display a character's innocence or good intentions. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  41. 41. Use of Shadows....Declaration of Principles Shadow is used to express the ethical value of a character; they cast doubt on a character's integrity, or by the absence of shadow, display a character's innocence or good intentions. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  42. 42. Use of Shadows....Declaration of Principles Shadow is used to express the ethical value of a character; they cast doubt on a character's integrity, or by the absence of shadow, display a character's innocence or good intentions. Kane is cast in shadow only as he reads the declaration aloud, and once he has finished reading he is cast back into light. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  43. 43. But who was this man, really? And what does “Rosebud” mean? Saturday, January 30, 2010
  44. 44. Reporter Thompson is charged with finding the answers. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  45. 45. Jerry Thompson - Played by William Alland. The reporter in charge of finding out the meaning of Kane’s last word. Thompson's investigation of “Rosebud” is the catalyst for everyone’s recollections in the movie. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  46. 46. Thompson investigates various people in Kane’s life * Thompson's visit to Susan Alexander Kane; * Thompson's visit to the Thatcher Library; * Thompson's interview with Bernstein; * Thompson's interview with Leland; * Thompson's interview with Susan Alexander Kane; * Thompson's conversation with Raymond; * The Finale. As the audience, we witness the results of his investigation through a series of flashbacks. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  47. 47. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  48. 48. Flashback 1 Walter Thatcher - Played by George Coulouris, the banker who becomes Kane’s legal guardian. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  49. 49. Snow Motif Ceilings “Charles!” Doors and windows to frame his Father- moving away from characters Scenes in one the camera Sled Close-up on Mary and Deep Focus Mary Kane close-up at Charles Actor angles for focus window Timelapse Saturday, January 30, 2010
  50. 50. Snow Motif Ceilings “Charles!” Doors and windows to frame his Father- moving away from characters Scenes in one the camera Sled Close-up on Mary and Deep Focus Mary Kane close-up at Charles Actor angles for focus window Timelapse Saturday, January 30, 2010
  51. 51. How To Run A Newspaper Saturday, January 30, 2010
  52. 52. Thatcher’s flashback. The witness to the event is always in the lower right of screen. How To Run A Newspaper Saturday, January 30, 2010
  53. 53. Thatcher’s flashback. The witness to the event is always in the lower right of screen. How To Run A Newspaper Deep Focus. The foreground and background are in both in focus. Quite revolutionary Saturday, January 30, 2010
  54. 54. Thatcher’s flashback. The witness to the Hearst Direct. You supply the prose event is always in the lower right of poems, I’ll supply the war screen. How To Run A Newspaper Deep Focus. The foreground and background are in both in focus. Quite revolutionary Saturday, January 30, 2010
  55. 55. Thatcher’s flashback. The witness to the Hearst Direct. You supply the prose event is always in the lower right of poems, I’ll supply the war screen. How To Run A Newspaper Deep Focus. The Line angle. The angle of focus among the foreground and background actors was utilized to give prominence to are in both in focus. Quite whatever was important in the scene. revolutionary Saturday, January 30, 2010
  56. 56. Thatcher’s flashback. The witness to the Hearst Direct. You supply the prose event is always in the lower right of poems, I’ll supply the war screen. How To Run A Newspaper Deep Focus. The Line angle. The angle of focus among the foreground and background actors was utilized to give prominence to are in both in focus. Quite whatever was important in the scene. revolutionary Saturday, January 30, 2010
  57. 57. Flashback 2 Mr. Bernstein - Played by Everett Sloane, Kane’s friend and employee. Bernstein, a bespectacled Jewish man, is the only character who loves Kane unconditionally. He completely overlooks Kane’s faults and is loyal to him regardless of the circumstances. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  58. 58. Famous shot of reporters seemingly coming to Unusual use of musical life out of the photo comedy number in a dramatic film. Original scene was set in a brothel but the censors forbid it. Deep focus allows clear illumination of entire room. Footlights can be Same set as newspaper office. seen behind the chair. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  59. 59. Famous shot of reporters seemingly coming to Unusual use of musical life out of the photo comedy number in a dramatic film. Original scene was set in a brothel but the censors forbid it. Deep focus allows clear illumination of entire room. Footlights can be Same set as newspaper office. seen behind the chair. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  60. 60. Flashback 3 Jedediah Leland - Played by Joseph Cotten, Kane’s college friend and the first reporter on Kane’s paper. Leland admires Kane's idealism about the newspaper business when they start working together. However, their principles quickly diverge, and Leland becomes more ethical as Kane becomes more unscrupulous. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  61. 61. The What elements suggest the deterioration of the marriage? Breakfast Scene Saturday, January 30, 2010
  62. 62. The What elements suggest the deterioration of the marriage? Breakfast Scene •Dissolve from Leland to breakfast. Almost a crossfade as from the theatre. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  63. 63. The What elements suggest the deterioration of the marriage? Breakfast Scene •Dissolve from Leland to breakfast. Almost a crossfade as from the theatre. •Tells the story of a marriage. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  64. 64. The What elements suggest the deterioration of the marriage? Breakfast Scene •Dissolve from Leland to breakfast. Almost a crossfade as from the theatre. •Tells the story of a marriage. •Written by Welles. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  65. 65. The What elements suggest the deterioration of the marriage? Breakfast Scene •Dissolve from Leland to breakfast. Almost a crossfade as from the theatre. •Tells the story of a marriage. •Written by Welles. •Notice flash-pan technique to show time elapse. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  66. 66. The What elements suggest the deterioration of the marriage? Breakfast Scene •Dissolve from Leland to breakfast. Almost a crossfade as from the theatre. •Tells the story of a marriage. •Written by Welles. •Notice flash-pan technique to show time elapse. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  67. 67. From a toothache..... Connection to his mother Globe Use of Sparing but effective use of shadow close-up Saturday, January 30, 2010
  68. 68. From a toothache..... Connection to his mother Globe Use of Sparing but effective use of shadow close-up Saturday, January 30, 2010
  69. 69. Flashback 4 Susan Alexander Kane - Played by Dorothy Comingore, Kane’s mistress, who becomes his second wife. When they meet, Susan seems soft and sweet to him, but her true nature turns out to be whiny and demanding. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  70. 70. Contrast Susan’s voice from previous scene. Take notice of other sound elements. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  71. 71. Contrast Susan’s voice from previous scene. Take notice of other sound elements. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  72. 72. Flashback 5 Raymond - Played by Paul Stewart, Kane’s butler at Xanadu. Speaks with Thompson about Rosebud near the end of the film. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  73. 73. Watch for: Depth of staircase, Cockatoo, Globe, Mirrors An ornate doorway frames Kane and is reflected in a mirror. The mirror causes the image to repeat infinitely. Deep focus is used to enhance the repetition, which adds to Kane's loneliness as an old man and to his isolation. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  74. 74. Watch for: Depth of staircase, Cockatoo, Globe, Mirrors An ornate doorway frames Kane and is reflected in a mirror. The mirror causes the image to repeat infinitely. Deep focus is used to enhance the repetition, which adds to Kane's loneliness as an old man and to his isolation. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  75. 75. Single source lighting and creative use of shadows and light inspired an entire genre of films called noir. Framing with doors, windows, or other set elements is a common directorial style today. Deep focus is seldom used in film these days, because it was primarily a device for black and white film, but Toland's work still has plenty of influence on modern cinematography. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  76. 76. In your group: 1) Reflection on the final scene 2) Define the essential relationship between your assigned character and Kane. 3) Recall at least one effective film technique utilized in your assigned character’s flashback. How did it’s use advance the story? 4) Prepare and present a short eulogy that your assigned character might have delivered at Kane’s funeral. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  77. 77. In your group: 1) Reflection on the final scene 2) Define the essential relationship between your assigned character and Kane. 3) Recall at least one effective film technique utilized in your assigned character’s flashback. How did it’s use advance the story? 4) Prepare and present a short eulogy that your assigned character might have delivered at Kane’s funeral. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  78. 78. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  79. 79. In your group: 1) Reflection on the final scene 2) Define the essential relationship between your assigned character and Kane. 3) Recall at least one effective film technique utilized in your assigned character’s flashback. How did it’s use advance the story? 4) Prepare a short eulogy that your assigned character might have delivered at Kane’s funeral. Saturday, January 30, 2010
  80. 80. For next time: 2/8 View The Grapes of Wrath Take Chapter I Quiz on textbook DVD. Email me the results- ascurato@gmail.com No CD? Answer # 3 on p. 18. as it applies to Citizen Kane. Email your answer to me. Read Chapter 2- Thematic Elements p. 20 Choose Maker/Shaker for your report. Saturday, January 30, 2010

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