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Blogging: Getting Started
 

Blogging: Getting Started

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Slide show from a presentation given at the 2006 ASBPE National Editorial Conference

Slide show from a presentation given at the 2006 ASBPE National Editorial Conference

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    Blogging: Getting Started Blogging: Getting Started Presentation Transcript

    • Blogging: Getting Started ASBPE National Editorial Conference July 21, 2006 Martha Spizziri Web Editor, ASBPE Blogger, ASBPE Boston Blog [email_address]
    • Background
      • Started as B2B magazine editor in 1984 at Cahners Publishing (now Reed Business Information)
      • Web editor since 1996 – on B2B magazine, then freelance
      • Started a personal blog first, then ASBPE Boston chapter blog
    • Why I Blog
      • Started chapter blog as an experiment to help create community among Boston area editors
        • More two-way communication with members through comments—so bimonthly chapter meetings would not be only forum for area editors to communicate
        • Wanted to post some local business press news (not just chapter news)—quick and easy with blog
        • Other chapter officers can update, communicate with members
        • Potential to make the blog the chapter page (soon to happen)
    • Results of Chapter Blog
      • Not a lot of readers—averages 7 unique visitors a day—but did get some regular readers, and purpose of better engaging local editors was fulfilled
        • Got a much better response to query for volunteers using blog than we ever did just posting it on static web page
        • Chapter board doubled in size after request posted on blog
        • Traffic slowly growing
    • Blogging Tools
      • Easy, free (or cheap) to get started.
      • Many blog tools out there.
      • Three good ones for business:
        • Blogger
        • Typepad (minimal charge)/Moveable Type (free version, but more setup involved)
        • WordPress
    • With Most Blogging Tools, You:
      • Can make the blog private, so you can experiment with it before going live
      • Can get comments automatically e-mailed to you
      • Can upload photos easily onto their space
      • Get a WYSIWYG editor for easy formatting
      • Can keep track of who’s linking to you (trackback/backlinks)
      • Prevent comment spam – either approve comments before they’re posted or use or word verification
      • Post remotely—via email or phone.
      • Easily have multiple people post to the blog
      • Can tweak the existing template (though usually requires some HTML knowledge)
      • Get an XML/RSS feed
    • It Really Is Easy as 1-2-3
    • Blogger Signup -- Step 1
    • Blogger Signup -- Step 2
    • Blogger Signup -- Step 3
    • Blogger Template Used for ASBPE Boston Blog (before customizing)
    • ASBPE Boston Blog Template After Customizing
    • Need to Know HTML/CSS to Edit Template in Blogger …
    • … But Can Edit in WYSIWYG Web Editing App, Then Paste Code Back Into Blogger
    • Blogger Posting Screen
    • TypePad
      • Minimal charge (starts at $4.95/month)
      • If you use one of their standard templates, no need to know HTML—you can add content to template without it
      • Has some bells and whistles—easy ability to add Amazon sales links, minimal traffic stats
      • Some may find that navigating the interface for template changes, extras has a learning curve, but posting is easy, similar to Blogger
    • TypePad Design Screen 1
    • TypePad Design Screen 2
    • TypePad Design Screen 3
    • WordPress
      • Free like Blogger, but like TypePad gives you ability to change template without HTML knowledge
      • Template editing/design options perhaps a bit more intuitive than TypePad
    • A WordPress Template-Design Screen
    • Third-Party Blogging Tools Vs. Company Web Infrastructure
      • Some publishing companies want make their pubs use their web infrastructure for blogs.
      • This could change the game—possibly limiting flexibility and maneuverability, making blog feel more static and like a regular web page. For example:
        • Email or phone posting may not be possible
        • May not be able to have multiple posters
        • May not be able to quickly change template when you want to
        • Blog readers expect changes and activity
        • Blogs using third-party tools can usually be hosted on corporate site
    • Blogging “Accessories”
      • Statistics:
        • StatCounter.com (free; can upgrade to paid version to get more features, history)
        • MyBlogLog.com
      • RSS Readers:
        • FeedBlitz
        • Newsgator
        • Yahoo
        • Google
        • Countless others
    • Blogging “Accessories” (cont’d)
      • Email updates for readers:
        • FeedBlitz
        • Bloglet
      • Third-party Comment Tracking:
        • HaloScan
        • CoComment
      • Search/publicity
        • Technorati, del.icio.us
          • let you assign tags to your blog; people can find your site in keyword search
          • let you see who’s linking to you
    • Upsides of Blogging
      • Forces you to keep up with industry news
      • Dialogue with colleagues
      • Opportunity to share ideas that spark your interest
      • Keeps your publication/organization in front of people’s eyes
    • Downsides of Blogging
      • Can be hard to find the time
      • If you lose momentum, your audience doesn’t grow very fast