Ministry With The Millennial Generation

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  • Ministry With The Millennial Generation

    1. 1. Ministry with the Millennial Generation
    2. 2. Ministry with the Millennial Generation
    3. 3. Ministry with the Millennial Generation
    4. 4. Ministry with the Millennial Generation
    5. 5. Ministry with the Millennial Generation
    6. 6. Ministry with the Millennial Generation
    7. 7. Ministry with the Millennial Generation
    8. 8. Ministry with the Millennial Generation Born between January 1997 and December 1997 (dates vary) Currently ages 11-31 Also called the Net Generation, IGeneration, Gen Y, ME Generation
    9. 10. Pollanywhere.com
    10. 11. Ministry with the Millennial Generation Today -Characteristics of this generation -Relational and leadership implications -Theological/Faith nurturing implications -Practical Steps and Ideas
    11. 12. Frames Developmental Tasks Postmodern Orientation Generational Characteristics
    12. 13. Frames True Untrue “ Everything exists on a continuum!!!”
    13. 14. Frames Many generational characteristics are, in part, a reaction to the previous generation
    14. 15. APPOINTMENT GAME
    15. 16. This generation grew up with a “baby on board” sign in their mom’s minivan. How do you see that affecting the personality of the kids you work with?
    16. 17. This generation has unprecedented choice and opportunities for customization. How might that affect the way one see’s the world?
    17. 18. This generation is more skeptical of the “sales pitch.” What are the implications of this for ministry?
    18. 19. Talk about one thing that is true in the lives of young people today that is dramatically different that when you were their age
    19. 20. This is the first truly global generation. How might this affect ministry or the way we talk about God’s kingdom?
    20. 21. Christians
    21. 22. Population under the age of 15
    22. 23. This generation has been exposed to many different religions. How do we approach this as Christian leaders? Do you ever “draw a line in the sand?”
    23. 24. Millennials have been “programmed” since they were 3. What are the challenges/benefits for you in ministry?
    24. 25. “ Technology is like the air” What are the benefits of technology for ministry?
    25. 26. video
    26. 28. These were challenges for education. Make 2-3 “posters” to hold up as if we were to make our own video
    27. 29. This has been called the laziest, most narcissistic generation. Agree/Disagree
    28. 30. Millennial are the smartest, most educated, most gifted generation. Pluses? Minuses?
    29. 31. Millennials like and respect their parents. Where are ministry opportunities in this?
    30. 32. Millennials are truly interested in making the world a better place. Are we too late to put this interest in a faith context?
    31. 33. <ul><li>The want freedom in everything they do, from freedom of choice to freedom of expression. </li></ul><ul><li>They love to customize, personalize </li></ul><ul><li>  They are the new scrutinizers </li></ul><ul><li>  They look for corporate integrity and openness when deciding what to buy and where to work </li></ul><ul><li>       </li></ul>Eight Generational Norms
    32. 34. 5. The Net Gen wants entertainment and play in their work, education, and social life        6. They are the collaboration and relationship generation   7. The Net Gen has a need for speed and not just in video games 8. They are the innovators      
    33. 35. <ul><li>The brains of millennials are wired differently than those who grew up in previous generations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>TV-Broadcast </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Internet-Interact </li></ul></ul>
    34. 37. <ul><li>Young people are not multi-tasking, they are switching quickly and holding onto the memory of those activities </li></ul>They may be faster switchers, but can they think? The more you multitask, the les deliberative you become; the less you're able to think and reason out a problem and the more you're willing to rely on stereotypical solutions. You can't think deeply about a subject, analyze it, or develop a creative idea if you're constantly distracted by an email message, a new site, or a cell phone call.”       -Jordan Grafman, Neurologist
    35. 38. <ul><li>They are the collaborators. Online games, commenting on pictures, group projects at school. </li></ul>
    36. 39. <ul><li>Online Discloser: ALL of the “experts” agree that young people are disclosing way too much online </li></ul>
    37. 40. Source: U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention Grown Up Digital pg. 85 +17% 63% Used a condom -7% 36% Was in a physical fight -8% 19% Carried a weapon -11% 29% Rode with someone who had been drinking +16% 90% Used seat belt Rate Changed Since 1990 Current Rate Youth Risk Behavior
    38. 41. <ul><li>Generational Lap: when the child becomes the expert in the family on something very important, i.e. technology, the system dynamics are altered in the relationships </li></ul>
    39. 42. Dad Mother Child Child Child
    40. 43. Child Parent Grandparent
    41. 44. Ministry Implications Work harder than you think you need to on building trust. Be transparent, have a blog and post twice a week.
    42. 45. Ministry Implications Address other religions with respect and knowledge, but be passionate and firm in your own faith in Christ
    43. 46. Ministry Implications Use every means of social media available to you. Facebook, twitter (?), myspace, blogging, youtube.
    44. 47. Ministry Implications Utilize the gifts of your young people in your ministry. They want to be producers, they are confident leaders, and they want to be part of something that makes a difference in their world.
    45. 48. Ministry Implications Engage parents in ministry where appropriate. Kids may be more open to their parent’s being present that you might think.

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