MARINE POLLUTION <ul>A PRESENTATION  BY ARVIND KRISHNAA J </ul>CSE A II YEAR SSN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
WHAT IS POLLUTION  ?? <ul>Pollution is the introduction of contaminants into an environment that causes instability, disor...
TYPES OF POLLUTION <ul><li>AIR POLLUTION
WATER POLLUTION
SOIL POLLUTION
MARINE POLLUTION
NOISE POLLUTION
THERMAL POLLUTION </li></ul>
WHAT IS MARINE POLLUTION  ?? <ul>Direct or indirect introduction of substances or energy into the marine environment ,  re...
MARINE POLLUTION
CAUSES OF MARINE POLLUTION <ul><li>Most sources of marine pollution  </li></ul><ul>are  land based . The pollution  often ...
SOURCES   (contd) <ul><li>Many potentially toxic chemicals adhere
to tiny particles which are then taken up by
plankton and benthos animals, most of
which are either deposit or filter feeders.
In this way, the toxins are concentrated
upward within ocean food chains.
Many particles combine chemically in a manner highly
depletive of oxygen, causing estuaries to become anoxic. </li></ul>
SOURCES   (contd) <ul><li>Pollution from ships
Ships can pollute waterways and oceans in many ways. Oil spills can have
devastating effects. While being toxic to marine life, polycyclic aromatic
hydrocarbons (PAHs), the components in crude oil, are very difficult to clean
up, and last for years in the sediment and marine environment. </li></ul>
SOURCES   (contd) <ul><li>Discharge of cargo residues from bulk carriers can pollute ports,
waterways and oceans. In many instances vessels intentionally
discharge illegal wastes despite foreign and domestic regulation
prohibiting such actions. Ships create noise pollution that disturbs
natural wildlife, and water from ballast tanks can spread harmful
algae and other invasive species </li></ul>
SOURCES   (contd) A cargo ship pumps ballast water over the side Invasive species  can take over once occupied areas, faci...
SOURCES   (contd) <ul><li>Plastic debris
Marine debris is mainly discarded human rubbish which floats on, or is suspended in the ocean. Eighty percent of marine de...
SOURCES   (contd) A  mute swan  builds a nest using plastic garbage. Discarded  plastic bags ,  six pack rings  and other ...
SOURCES   (contd) <ul><li>Many animals that live on or in the sea  consume  flotsam by mistake, as it often looks similar ...
Plastics accumulate because they don't biodegrade in the way many other substances do. They will photodegrade on exposure ...
SOURCES   (contd) <ul><li>In marine environments, photodegraded plastic disintegrates into ever smaller pieces while remai...
Many of these long-lasting pieces end up in the stomachs of marine birds and animals,including sea turtles, and black-foot...
SOURCES   (contd) <ul><li>Plastic debris tends to accumulate at the centre of ocean gyres
Toxic additives used in the manufacture of plastic materials can leach out into their surroundings when exposed to water. ...
Hydrophobic contaminants are also
known to bioaccumulate in fatty tissues,
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Marine Pollution

  1. 1. MARINE POLLUTION <ul>A PRESENTATION BY ARVIND KRISHNAA J </ul>CSE A II YEAR SSN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
  2. 2. WHAT IS POLLUTION ?? <ul>Pollution is the introduction of contaminants into an environment that causes instability, disorder, harm or discomfort to the ecosystem i.e. physical systems or living organisms </ul>
  3. 3. TYPES OF POLLUTION <ul><li>AIR POLLUTION
  4. 4. WATER POLLUTION
  5. 5. SOIL POLLUTION
  6. 6. MARINE POLLUTION
  7. 7. NOISE POLLUTION
  8. 8. THERMAL POLLUTION </li></ul>
  9. 9. WHAT IS MARINE POLLUTION ?? <ul>Direct or indirect introduction of substances or energy into the marine environment , resulting in harm to the living resources , hazards to human health ,hindrance to marine activities, including fishing, impairment of the quality of sea water and reduction of amenities </ul>
  10. 10. MARINE POLLUTION
  11. 11. CAUSES OF MARINE POLLUTION <ul><li>Most sources of marine pollution </li></ul><ul>are land based . The pollution often comes from nonpoint sources such as agricultural runoff and wind blown debris. </ul>
  12. 12. SOURCES (contd) <ul><li>Many potentially toxic chemicals adhere
  13. 13. to tiny particles which are then taken up by
  14. 14. plankton and benthos animals, most of
  15. 15. which are either deposit or filter feeders.
  16. 16. In this way, the toxins are concentrated
  17. 17. upward within ocean food chains.
  18. 18. Many particles combine chemically in a manner highly
  19. 19. depletive of oxygen, causing estuaries to become anoxic. </li></ul>
  20. 20. SOURCES (contd) <ul><li>Pollution from ships
  21. 21. Ships can pollute waterways and oceans in many ways. Oil spills can have
  22. 22. devastating effects. While being toxic to marine life, polycyclic aromatic
  23. 23. hydrocarbons (PAHs), the components in crude oil, are very difficult to clean
  24. 24. up, and last for years in the sediment and marine environment. </li></ul>
  25. 25. SOURCES (contd) <ul><li>Discharge of cargo residues from bulk carriers can pollute ports,
  26. 26. waterways and oceans. In many instances vessels intentionally
  27. 27. discharge illegal wastes despite foreign and domestic regulation
  28. 28. prohibiting such actions. Ships create noise pollution that disturbs
  29. 29. natural wildlife, and water from ballast tanks can spread harmful
  30. 30. algae and other invasive species </li></ul>
  31. 31. SOURCES (contd) A cargo ship pumps ballast water over the side Invasive species can take over once occupied areas, facilitate the spread of new diseases, introduce new genetic material, alter underwater seascapes and jeopardize the ability of native species to obtain food.
  32. 32. SOURCES (contd) <ul><li>Plastic debris
  33. 33. Marine debris is mainly discarded human rubbish which floats on, or is suspended in the ocean. Eighty percent of marine debris is plastic - a component that has been rapidly accumulating since the end of World War II. The mass of plastic in the oceans may be as high as one hundred million metric tons </li></ul>
  34. 34. SOURCES (contd) A mute swan builds a nest using plastic garbage. Discarded plastic bags , six pack rings and other forms of plastic waste which finish up in the ocean present dangers to wildlife and fisheries.Aquatic life can be threatened through entanglement, suffocation, and ingestion. Fishing nets usually made of plastic, can be left or lost in the ocean by fishermen. Known as ghost nets , these entangle fish , dolphins , sea turtles , sharks , dugongs , crocodiles , seabirds , crabs , and other creatures, restricting movement, causing starvation, laceration and infection, and, in those that need to return to the surface to breathe, suffocation.
  35. 35. SOURCES (contd) <ul><li>Many animals that live on or in the sea consume flotsam by mistake, as it often looks similar to their natural prey.Plastic debris, when bulky or tangled, is difficult to pass, and may become permanently lodged in the digestive tracts of these animals, blocking the passage of food and causing death through starvation or infection
  36. 36. Plastics accumulate because they don't biodegrade in the way many other substances do. They will photodegrade on exposure to the sun, but they do so properly only under dry conditions, and water inhibits this process. </li></ul>
  37. 37. SOURCES (contd) <ul><li>In marine environments, photodegraded plastic disintegrates into ever smaller pieces while remaining polymers, even down to the molecular level. When floating plastic particles photodegrade down to zooplankton sizes, jellyfish attempt to consume them, and in this way the plastic enters the ocean food chain.
  38. 38. Many of these long-lasting pieces end up in the stomachs of marine birds and animals,including sea turtles, and black-footed albatross. </li></ul>
  39. 39. SOURCES (contd) <ul><li>Plastic debris tends to accumulate at the centre of ocean gyres
  40. 40. Toxic additives used in the manufacture of plastic materials can leach out into their surroundings when exposed to water. Waterborne hydrophobic pollutants collect and magnify on the surface of plastic debris, thus making plastic far more deadly in the ocean than it would be on land
  41. 41. Hydrophobic contaminants are also
  42. 42. known to bioaccumulate in fatty tissues,
  43. 43. biomagnifying up the food chain and
  44. 44. putting pressure on apex predators </li></ul>
  45. 45. SOURCES (contd) <ul><li>Toxins
  46. 46. Apart from plastics, there are particular problems with other toxins that do not disintegrate rapidly in the marine environment. Examples of persistent toxins are PCBs, DDT, pesticides, furans, dioxins and phenols. Heavy metals are metallic chemical elements that have a relatively high density and are toxic or poisonous at low concentrations. Examples are mercury, lead, nickel, arsenic and cadmium.
  47. 47. Such toxins can accumulate in the tissues of many species of aquatic life in a process called bioaccumulation. </li></ul>
  48. 48. EUTROPHICATION <ul><li>Eutrophication
  49. 49. Eutrophication is an increase in chemical nutrients, typically compounds containing nitrogen or phosphorus, in an ecosystem. It can result in an increase in the ecosystem's primary productivity (excessive plant growth and decay), and further effects including lack of oxygen and severe reductions in water quality, fish, and other animal populations. </li></ul>
  50. 50. EUTROPHICATION (contd) <ul><li>The biggest culprit are rivers that empty into the ocean, and with it the many chemicals used as fertilizers in agriculture as well as waste from livestock and humans. An excess of oxygen depleting chemicals in the water can lead to hypoxia and the creation of a dead zone. </li></ul>
  51. 51. EUTROPHICATION (PICTORIAL REPRESENTATION)
  52. 52. Acidification <ul>The oceans are normally a natural carbon sink, absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Because the levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide are increasing, the oceans are becoming more acidic. The potential consequences of ocean acidification are not fully understood, but there are concerns that structures made of calcium carbonate may become vulnerable to dissolution, affecting corals and the ability of shellfish to form shells </ul>
  53. 53. SUMMARY <ul><ul><ul><li>SUMMARY OF CAUSE AND EFFECT </li><ul><li>DISCUSSED SO FAR
  54. 54. NOT DISCUSSED SO FAR </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  55. 55. TYPE PRIMARY SOURCE/CAUSE EFFECT <ul>NUTRIENTS </ul>SEWAGE RUNOFF FROM FORESTRY FARMING AND OTHER LAND USE. ALSO AIRBORNE NITROGEN OXIDES FROM POWER PLANTS,CARS .... CAUSES ALGAL BLOOM IN COASTAL AREAS WATERS. DECOMPOSING ALGAE DEPLETES WATER OF OXYGEN,KILLING OTHER MARINE LIFE.CAN CAUSE ALGAL BLOOM THAT KILLS MARINE LIFE <ul>SEDIMENTS </ul>EROSION FROM MINING,FORESTRY,FARMING,AND OTHER LAND USE;COASTAL DREDGING AND MINING Cloudy water,mpedes photosynthesis below surface waters. Clog gills of fish. Smother and bury coastal ecosystem. Carry toxins and excess nutrients.
  56. 56. TYPE PRIMARY SOURCE/CAUSE EFFECT <ul>PATHOGENS </ul>Sewage,lifestock Carry toxins and excess nutrients. Contaminate coastal areas and seafood,causing cholera and typhoid. <ul>PERSISTENT TOXINS </ul>Industrial discharge wastewater discharge from cities, pesticides from farms forests,home use etc.,seepage from landfills Poison or cause disease in coastal marine life especially inear major cities or industry. Contaminate seafood. Fat-soluble toxins bio-magnify in predators and cause complications
  57. 57. TYPE PRIMARY SOURCE/CAUSE EFFECT <ul>RADIOACTIVE SUBSTANCES </ul>Discarded nuclear submarines and military waste ; atmospheric fallout and industrial wastes Hotspots of radioactivity. Can enter food chain and cause disease in marine life. Concentrate in top predators and shellfish, wjich are eaten by people. ` THERMAL Cooling water from power plants and industrial sites Kills coral and other temperature sensitive sedentary species. Displace other marine life
  58. 58. CORAL REEFS are aragonite structures produced by living organisms, found in marine waters containing few nutrients. In most reefs, the predominant organisms are stony corals , colonial cnidarians that secrete an exoskeleton of calcium carbonate . The accumulation of skeletal material, broken and piled up by wave action and bioeroders , produces a calcareous formation that supports the living corals and a great variety of other animal and plant life.
  59. 59. BENEFITS OF CORAL REEFS 1. Makes shore zones safe from waves by making them and breaking them up, and creates quiet water marine habitats for a variety of species. 2. High rates of CaCO 3 production play an important role in global carbon cycle 3. Biodiversity : One quarter of species in ocean live in and around reefs (also see 1 above). This makes them underwater tropical rainforests. Are they in the same state of decline? 4. Medicinal value of reef dwelling biota: some produce compounds active against asthma, heart disease, leukemia, tumors, HIV. Chemicals produced by sea slugs and sponges to repel fish are useful as insecticides. 5. Coral skeletons are being investigated as substrate for bone grafts. 6. Source of food : 10% of global fish catch 7. Economies of tropical countries built on tourism and fishing 8. Fossil reefs on land are a source of building stone, cement
  60. 60. ENDANGERMENT AND DECLINE OF CORAL REEFS 1. Extent of the problem: we are presiding over a major collapse a. Less than 10% of reefs in Indonesia, the Phillipines, Jamaica, among others, are healthy b. In 50 years, 75% of all reefs could be done in 2. Population growth, development of tropical coastline a. Three billion people live in coastal regions – this will double by 2050 b. Development, deforestation of inland areas 1. brings sediment-laden stream waters to coastal ocean 2. brings nutrient-rich waters to coastal ocean: algal blooms can suffocate reefs and lead to proliferation of starfish and urchins that can decimate reefs. 1 and 2 are cause of major declines in reefs in Jamaica, Barbados, Belize 3. Warming of tropical waters: El Nino, global warming Temperature, salinity balance upset led to coral &quot;bleaching&quot; events during 1980’s. Corals expel their zooxanthallae leading to their tissues being transparent instead of colored, leaving their white aragonite (CaCO 3 ) skeletons showing through. Corals can bounce back from these events, but not in the face of other environmental stresses such as poison and sediment and nutrient-rich runoff.
  61. 61. ENDANGERMENT AND DECLINE OF CORAL REEFS (CONTD...) 4. Overfishing of reefs a. Ecosystems thrown off balance: Fish that graze algae growing on reefs are wiped out, algae flourishes and suffocates reef b. Nefarious fishing methods: cyanide, bleach, crowbars, explosive charges. Fishing for food, and exotic aquarius sale more &quot;normal&quot; overfishing with nets, traps, and spearguns. 5. Carbon di oxide increae global warming, and sea level rise potential Note dependence of reefs on temperature, light, which are water depth dependent, and response of reefs to sea level. Note also dependence of reefs on CO 2 levels in the ocean. 6. Accumulated environmental stress Coral polyps deal with sediment, pollution stresses by secreting more mucous protein that coats their outer tissues, which depletes the organism’s metabolic reserves, increasing opportunity for infections.
  62. 63. Marine pollution is part of the problem of too much pollution by humans in general. There are only two ways to remedy this: either the human population is reduced, or the ecological footprint left behind by the average human is reduced. If we do not follow the second way, then the first way may be imposed upon us, as world ecosystems falter and cease to support us.
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