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Stress Management

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  • 1. 1 CHAPTER - 1 INTRODUCTION
  • 2. 2 INTRODUCTION: 1.1 IMPORTANCE OF THE STUDY 20TH century has been regarded as the period of incredible change in human history. Philosophers and scientists have been various names to this period. Peter Drucker has called it “The Age of Discontinuity”, John Galbraith has called it “The Age of Future Shock” and Hari Albrecht called it “The Age of Anxiety”. Stress has become the 21 century buzz word, from the high pervading corporate echelons to the bassinets of teaching infants’ nurseries we find this world liberally used. Stress is part of modern life. Various events in life cause stress, starting with the birth of a child and enduring with the death of a dear one. Urbanization, industrialization and the increase scale of operations in society are some of the reasons for rising stress. It is an inevitable consequence of socio-economic complexity and to some extent, its stimulant as well. People experience stress as they can no longer have complete control over what happen in their lives. The telephone goes out of order, power is shut down, water supply is disrupted, children perform poorly at school etc, we feel frustrated and then stressed. The word stress is derived from a Latin word “stringere”, meaning to draw tight. From the view point of physical sciences, the phenomena of stress are evident in all materials when they are subjected to “force, pressure, strain or strong-front”. Every material steel, rock or wood has its own limit up to which it can withstand stress without being damaged. Similarly human beings can tolerate certain level of stress. Stress is highly individualistic in nature. Some people have high levels of stress tolerance for stress and thrive very well in the face of several stressors in the environment. In fact, some individuals will not perform well unless they experience a level of stress which activates and energizes then to put forth their best results. For every individual there is an optimum level of stress under which he or she will perform to full capacity. If the stress experience is below the optimum level, then the individual gets bored, the motivational level of work reaches a low point and it results to
  • 3. 3 careless mistakes, forgetting to do things and thinking of things other than work during work hours and also leads to absenteeism which may ultimately lead to turnover. If on the other hand, stress experience is above the optimum level, it leads to too many conflicts with the supervisor or leads to increase of errors, bad decisions and the individual may experience insomnia, stomach problems, and psychosomatic illness. The present world is fast changing and there are lots of pressures and demands at work. These pressures at work lead to physical disorders. Stress refers to individual’s reaction to a disturbing factor in the environment. It is an adaptive response to certain external factor or situation or what can be called environmental stimuli as reflected in an opportunity, constraint, or demand the outcome of which is uncertain but important. In short stress is a response to an external factor that results in physical, emotional, behavioral deviations in a person. Stress is an all pervading modern phenomenon that takes a heavy toll of human life. Different situations and circumstances in our personal life and in our job produce stress. Those can be divided into factors related to the organization and factors related to the person which include his experience and personality traits. Job related factors are work overload, time pressures, poor quality of supervision, insecure political climate, role conflict and ambiguity, difference between company values and employee values. Person related factors are death of spouse, or of a close friend, family problems, change to a different line of work, prolonged illness in the family, change in social activities, eating habits, etc., Personality traits are ‘Type A’ personality. They are impatient, ambitious, competitive, aggressive, and hardworking. They set high goals and demands of themselves and others. And they are particularly prone to stress inducing anticipatory emotions such as anxiety.
  • 4. 4 REMEDIES TO REDUCE STRESS There are two major approaches to reduce stress. They are, • Individual approaches • Organizational approaches INDIVIDUAL APPROACHES An employee can take individual responsibility to reduce his/her stress level. Individual strategies that have proven effective include, implementing time management techniques, increasing physical exercise, relaxation training, and expanding the social support network.  Time management Many people manage their time very poorly. Some of well known time management principles include, o Making daily list of activities to be accomplished o Scheduling activities according to the priorities set o Prioritizing activities by importance and urgency o Knowing your daily cycle and handling the most demanding parts of your job.  Physical exercise Practicing non-competitive physical exercises like aerobics, race walking, jogging, swimming, and riding a bi-cycle.  Relaxation training Relaxation techniques such as meditation, hypnosis and bio-feedback. The objective is to reach in state of deep relaxation, where one feels physically relaxed, somewhat from detached from the immediate environment. Fifteen or twenty minutes a
  • 5. 5 day of deep relaxation releases tension and provides a person with a pronounced sense of peacefulness.  Social support Having families, friends or work colleagues to talk provides an outlet, when stress levels become excessive. So expand your social support network that helps you with someone to hear your problems. 1.2 ORGANIZATIONAL APPROACHES Several of the factors that cause stress particularly task and role demands and organizations structure are controlled by management. As such they can be modified or changed. Some of the strategies that management want to consider include improved personal self section and job placement, use of realistic goal setting, redesigning of jobs, improved organizational communication and establishment of corporate wellness programmes. Certain jobs are more stressful than others. Individual with little experience or an external lower of control tend to be more proven to stress. Selection and placement decisions should take these facts into consideration. Goal setting helps to reduce stress. It also provides motivation. Designing jobs to give employees more responsibility, more meaningful work, more autonomy, and increased feedback can reduce stress, because these factors give the employee greater control over work activities and lessen dependence on others. Increasingly formal organizational communication with employees reduces uncertainly by lessency role ambiguity and role conflict. Wellness program, say, employee counseling form on the employee’s total physical and mental condition. They typically proud work ships to help people quit smoking, control alcohol usage, eat better and develop a regular exercise program. Another remedy for reducing stress is cognitive restructuring. It involves two step procedures. First irrational or maladaptive thought processes that create stress are identified. For example Type A individuals may believe that they must be successful
  • 6. 6 at everything they do. The second step consists of replacing these irrational thoughts with more rational or reasonable ones. One important remedy to reduce stress is the maintenance of good sleep. Research conducted on laboratory specimen to have met with startling discoveries. Sleep starved rats have developed stress syndrome. The amount of sleep one requires varies from person to person and is dependent on one’s lifestyle. The American National Sleep Foundation claims that a minimum of eight hours of sleep is essential for good health. Generally studies shows that young adults can manage with about 7-8 hours. After the age of 35, six hours of sleep is sufficient whereas people over 65 years may just need three or four hours. 1.3 INDUSTRY PROFILE In India, the software boom started somewhere in the late 1990s. Most of the Indian software companies at that moment offered only limited software services such as the banking and the engineering software. The business software boom started with the emergence of Y2K problem, when a large number of skilled personnel were required to fulfill the mammoth database-correction demand in order to cope up with the advent of the new millennium. ITES, Information Technology Enabled Service, is defined as outsourcing of processes that can be enabled with information technology and covers diverse areas like finance, HR, administration, health care, telecommunication, manufacturing etc. Armed with technology and manpower, these services are provided from e-enabled locations. This radically reduces costs and improves service standards. In short, this internet service provider aims in providing B2B e-commerce solutions. OBJECTIVE OF ITES ITES was formally known as IndoNet. The main objectives of ITES are:
  • 7. 7 • Enabling business strategy. • Achieving an organization’s business goals. INDIA’s POTENTIAL The country’s strength in the form of low staff costs, a large pool of skilled, English speaking workforce, conducive policy environment and Government support has made India a popular choice for customers seeking outsourced services. Indian Government is making assiduous effort for prompting ITES. The country is well positioned to derive benefits from the ITES market and become a key hub for ITES service. ITES SERVICES ITES offers different services integrated in a single delivery mechanism to end users. The profile of the Indian IT Services has been undergoing a change in the last few years, partly as it moves up the value chain and partly as a response to the market dynamics. Ten years ago, most US companies would not even consider outsourcing some of their IT projects to outside vendors. Now, ten years later, a vast majority of US companies use the professional services of Indian Software engineers in some manner, through large, medium or small companies or through individuals recruited directly. The market competition is forcing organizations to cut down on costs of products. The professional IT services on the other hand are becoming increasingly expensive. The offshore software development model is today where onsite professional services were ten years ago. There is a high chance (almost a mathematical certainty), that in less than ten years, the vast majority of IT services (software development being just one of them) from developed countries, will be, one, outsourced and two, outsourced to an offshore vendor. Despite the global economic slowdown, the Indian IT software and services industry is maintaining a steady pace of growth. Software development activity is not confined to a
  • 8. 8 few cities in India. Software development centers, such as Bangalore, Hyderabad, Mumbai, Pune, Chennai, Calcutta, Delhi-Noida-Gurgaon, Vadodara, Bhubaneswar, Ahmedabad, Goa, Chandigarh, Trivandrum are all developing quickly. All of these places have state-of-the-art software facilities and the presence of a large number of Overseas vendors. India’s most prized resource is its readily available technical work force. India has the second largest English-speaking scientific professionals in the world, second only to the U.S. It is estimated that India has over 4 million technical workers, over 1,832 educational institutions and polytechnics, which train more than 67,785 computer software professionals every year. The enormous base of skilled manpower is a major draw for global customers. India provides IT services at one-tenth the price. No wonder more and more companies are basing their operations in India. The industry is in an expansion mode right now, with dozens of new offshore IT services vendors emerging everyday, the industry has a high probability of being subjected to the 80:20 rule in not too distant a future. In perhaps another ten years, 80 percent of all outsourced offshore development work will be done by 20 percent of all vendors, a small number of high quality, trusted vendors. Only a few select countries and only the most professional companies in those countries will emerge as winners. India will definitely be the country of choice for offshore software development. We have the potential to become and remain the country of choice for all software developments and IT enabled services, second only to the USA. The third choice could be far distant. India is among the three countries that have built supercomputers on their own. The other two are USA and Japan. India is among six countries that launch satellites and do so even for Germany and Belgium. India's INSAT is among the world's largest domestic satellite communication systems. India has the third largest telecommunications network among the emerging economies, and it is among the top ten networks of the world. To become a global leader in the IT industry and retain that position, we need to constantly keep moving up the value chain, focusing on finished products and solutions,
  • 9. 9 rather than purely on skill sets and resumes. We need to be able to package our services as products, rather than offering them as raw material. We need to be able to recognize and build up on our strengths and work on our weaknesses. The Indian Information Technology (IT) and IT Enabled Services (ITES) success story and its paradigm changing impact on global service delivery is now a well acknowledged fact. However, much of the success achieved by the sector has been attributed to the meteoric growth in exports – that has overshadowed the latent opportunities unlocked and growth observed in the domestic market over the past few years. Spotlight on the Domestic IT Services Market Opportunity: Domestic demand for IT in India is witnessing a gradual transformation from being predominantly hardware driven towards a solutions oriented approach – resulting in a growing emphasis on services. In fact, revenue growth in the services segment alone has reported faster growth than that for the overall domestic IT market (including hardware, software and services) over the past few years. As depicted in the following chart, this trend is expected to continue over the forecast period. Growth of IT Spending in India
  • 10. 10 The liberalization of Indian economic policy, de-regulation of key sectors and progressive moves towards further integrating India with the global economy has been a key driver of increased IT adoption in the country. This is best reflected in the fact that most indigenous players in telecom and banking, two key sectors with significant multinational corporation (MNC) participation, have significantly upgraded their levels of IT adoption to offer best-in-class services comparable to those offered by the global competition and these two sectors together account for approximately 35-40 percent of the domestic spend on IT services. Similar competitive pressures in other more recently deregulated service sectors such as airlines and insurance, and the uptake in the manufacturing and industrial sectors; and the several large e-governance initiatives launched by the government under the National E- Governance Plan (NEGP) are expected to provide sustained growth in domestic demand for IT services over the next few years. Over the next five years, domestic spending on outsourced IT services is projected to more than double, from INR 103 billion in 2004 to over INR 238 billion in 2009. Five Year Revenue Forecasts for Key Service Lines in the Domestic Market (INR Million)
  • 11. 11 Systems integration and network integration make up a high growth-large size category within the IT services engagements. These services will continue to be prime drivers of the domestic IT services market in the enterprise segment due to the increasing growth in the enterprise application implementation and increased demand for network integration from telecom & banking verticals. 1.4 RESEARCH PROBLEM/OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY PROBLEM DEFINITION Identifying the kind of stress employee’s at different stage in the corporate ladder faces in IT/ ITES and to check if they are mentally fit to face these problems. Primary objective: • To undergo an in-depth study about the stress among the employees of IT/ITES sector. Secondary objective: • To identify the factors causing stress among the employees. • To find out the level and kind of stress among the employees of different age groups.
  • 12. 12 • To study about the effects of stress on employees in IT/ITES sector. • To identify the coping strategies to manage stress. SCOPE The scope of this thesis would be to identify the stress the employees at different levels face in the organization and how much mentally they are fit to face this kind of stress. To learn the ways the organization deals to handle the kind of stress the employees face. To know how the organization gets affected due to the stress faced by the employees. The study also emphasis on how women get stressed and how they handle the stress and stay mentally fit. JUSTIFICATION Today in this recession period employees are not mentally prepared for the pressure in the company. So they stress themselves too much and suffer in the organization. Through my thesis I am going to find out what are causes of stress employee’s face and how far they are mentally fit to face these stress which would enrich my knowledge and help in my career. 1.5 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY • One of the most important limitations was the time period. The time period was not sufficient. • The other limitation was the non-cooperative nature of the people to give information and interviews. • An important limitation was the area of the study which covers only Chennai wherein market information collected cannot be a final key.
  • 13. 13 • The employees were not willing to disclose their views openly. • Sample for the study taken is of only 100 consumers. This can also act as a constraint in the study. • The investigator intended to cover only few areas of stress relevant to the proposed study. 1.6 BENEFITS TO THE STUDY i. To Self- • Knowledge earning. • Gaining practical exposure to Overcome Stress during work time. • Gain knowledge to follow tactics to get relief from Stress level during Work hours. ii. To company- • This report will be beneficial for companies and Employer too because from this report they will get an idea to keep the Employee Satisfaction & motivated by lowering the stress level. • From this report they will get the knowledge about required changes in their strategies and to overcome stress level.
  • 14. 14 CHAPTER - 2 LITERATURE SURVEY
  • 15. 15 2.1 REVIEW OF LITERATURE According to Mr. Madhup Johri, Assistant Director, IPM Meerut in his articles “Stress management strategy and techniques” he has pointed out Stress is a part of day-to-day living of every individual. The college students may experience stress in meeting the academic demands, people on the job, business men may suffer stress to reach office in time and to complete the projects on time and even the house hold ladies may experience stress in managing the home affairs and to look for the maid servant. The reasons for the stress differ from person to person. The stress people experience should not be necessarily treated as harmful. An optimum amount of stress can always act as an energizer or motivator and propel people to apply the efforts and complete the work. But a high level of Stress can be a serious threat to the personality traits of the Individual and can cause physiological and social problems. Source: http://www.humanlinks.com/manres/articles/stress_management.htm
  • 16. 16 According to Mr.Chris latter in his article “How to overcome stress in IT sector” he has pointed out that when we really start to learn how to overcome stress, we realize that it is mainly a choice that we make every day. You either decide to allow stress to affect you or you don't. While some may be more in the habit of doing this than others, everyone can overcome it. If you catch yourself getting stressed again, just think about this and you will more often than not feel better. Your stress will slowly but surely begin to subside. Relax your by taking brake or you can chat with your friends that allows to free your mind and continue the work. In IT sector there is more work pressure so you need to manage by following some tactics. Source: http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Overcome-Stress!&id=2086194 According to Mr.Bhatt in his articles “A study of general role stress among IT/ITES sector” he has pointed out that IT/ITeS industry in India got tremendous boost in the past decade due to factors like liberalization and globalization of the Indian economy coupled with favorable government policies. This sector of the sunshine industry brought a new work environment and sea changes in the employment trends. Service providers characterized this sector by adhering to strict deadlines set by their customers, working in different time zones, interdependency in teams, multitasking, increased interaction with offshore clients and extended work hours. IT/ITeS professionals are constantly working and they feel more pressurized in their work so company should take initiatives to make the employee retention by providing suitable facilities to overcome stress in their environment. Source: http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G1-179978543.html A review on the previous studies on stress among the employees is necessary to know the areas already covered. This will help to find our new areas uncovered and to study them in depth. The earlier studies made on stress among the employees are briefly reviewed here.
  • 17. 17 The research study of Jamal. M* finds that job stressors were significantly related to employees’ psychosomatic problems, job satisfaction, unproductive time at the job, and absenteeism. Type A behavior was found to be an important moderator of the stress outcome relationship. Brief. A. P. and J. M. Atieh*, argues that it is not safe to assume that job conditions that have an adverse impact on affective reactions to the job will also have a negative impact on overall subjective well-being. Fienmann views stress as a psychological response state of negative effect characterized by a persistent and a high level of experienced anxiety or tension. Recent research into the interaction between the mind body show that we may place our body on stress ‘alert’ quite unconsciously, because of our psychological and emotional attitudes to stress. Anticipatory emotions like impatience, anxiety, and anger can produce the same nerve impulses and chemical reactions as being faced with a concrete challenge. So when faced with a stressful situation, we must either use up the energy created by the body to challenge or learn how to “turn off”, the response using a conscious relaxation technique. * Jamal M. “Job stress-prone Type A behavior, personal and organizational consequences”, Canadian Journal Administration Sciences, 1985. pp 360-74. Brief. A. P and J. M. Atieh, “Studying job stress: Are we making mountains out of molehills?” Journal of occupational behavior, 1987 pp115-26. Hans Seyle, the endocrinologist, whose research on General Adaptation Syndrome (GAS), for the first time, revealed how human beings adapt themselves to emotional strives and strains in their lives. According to him emotional stress occurs in three important stages. 1. Alarm reaction stage 2. Resistance stage 3. Exhaustion stage.
  • 18. 18 Alarm reaction is caused by physical or psychological stressors. Resistances are brought about by ACTH hormone of the body. Exhaustion follows when ACTH dwindles as a result of continual stress. (ACTH-Aprinocorticotropic) According to Stephen .P. Robbins*, stress related headaches are the leading cause of loss of work time in U. S. industry. Cooper and Marshall* visualize stress as characteristics of both the focal individual and his environment. They designate the internal and external consultive forces as ‘pressures’ or ‘stressors’ and the resulting stalk of the organism on stress. CHAPTER - 3 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
  • 19. 19 3.1 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Research is defined as human activity based on intellectual application in the investigation of matter. The primary purpose for applied research is discovering, interpreting, and the development of methods and systems for the advancement of human knowledge on a wide variety of scientific matters of our world and the universe. Research can use the scientific method, but need not do so. Scientific research relies on the application of the scientific method, a harnessing of curiosity. This research provides scientific information and theories for the explanation of the nature and the properties of the world around us. It makes practical applications possible. Scientific research is funded by public authorities, by charitable organisations and by private groups, including many companies. Scientific research can be subdivided into different classifications according to their academic and application disciplines. Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem. The research methodology in the present study deals with research design, data collection methods, sampling methods, survey, analysis and interpretations.
  • 20. 20 APPROACHES TO RESEARCH Descriptive approach is one of the most popular approaches these days. In this approach, a problem is described by the researcher by using questionnaire or schedule. This approach enables a researcher to explore new areas of investigation. 3.2 RESEARCH DESIGN A research design is the arrangement of conditions for collection and analysis of data in a manner that aims to combine relevance to the research purpose with economy in procedure. • A well structured questionnaire is framed. • Data is collected from the employees who work in IT/ITES sector. • Findings are made and necessary suggestions and recommendations are given. 3.3 DATA SOURCES There are two types of data collection namely primary data collection and secondary data collection. PRIMARY DATA The primary data is defined as the data, which is collected for the first time and fresh in nature, and happen to be original in character through field survey. Primary data collection, you collect the data yourself using methods such as interviews and questionnaires. The key point here is that the data you collect is unique to you and your research and, until you publish, no one else has access to it. There are many methods of collecting primary data and the main methods include:
  • 21. 21 • questionnaires • interviews • focus group interviews SECONDARY DATA The secondary data are those which have already been collected by someone else and have been passed through statistical process. The secondary data for this study are already available in the firm's internal records, annual report, broaches, and company's website. In research, Secondary data is collecting and possibly processing data by people other than the researcher in question. Common sources of secondary data for social science include censuses, large surveys, and organizational records (Mintel). In sociology primary data is data you have collected yourself and secondary data is data you have gathered from primary sources to create new research. In terms of historical research, these two terms have different meanings. A primary source is a book or set of archival records. A secondary source is a summary of a book or set of records. Advantages to the secondary data collection method are - 1) it saves time that would otherwise be spent collecting data, 2) provides a larger database (usually) than what would be possible to collect on ones own However there are disadvantages to the fact that the researcher cannot personally check the data so it's reliability may be questioned. 3.4 DATA COLLECTION METHOD The data collection method used in this research is survey method. Here the data are systematically recorded from the respondents. RESEARCH TOOL
  • 22. 22 A structured questionnaire has been prepared to get the relevant information from the respondents. The questionnaire consists of a variety of questions presented to the respondents for their despondence. The various types of questions used in this survey are:  Open ended questions  Closed ended questions  Multiple choice questions SAMPLING-MEANING Sampling is that part of statistical practice concerned with the selection of individual observations intended to yield some knowledge about a population of concern, especially for the purposes of statistical inference. Each observation measures one or more properties (weight, location, etc.) of an observable entity enumerated to distinguish objects or individuals. Survey weights often need to be applied to the data to adjust for the sample design. Results from probability theory and statistical theory are employed to guide practice. The sampling process comprises several stages: • Defining the population of concern • Specifying a sampling frame, a set of items or events possible to measure • Specifying a sampling method for selecting items or events from the frame • Determining the sample size • Implementing the sampling plan • Sampling and data collecting • Reviewing the sampling process SAMPLE UNIT The employees of IT/ITES sector are the sample unit in the survey.
  • 23. 23 SAMPLE SIZE The sample size chosen for this study is 100. TYPE OF SAMPLING The sampling type is non-probability which involves deliberating selections of particular units constituting a sample, which represents the universe. STRATIFIED SAMPLING: Stratum means a layer population from which samples are to be selected may contain a number of layers from each layer a few samples are selected that is why this method is called stratified sampling. 3.5 EVALUATING AND ANALYZING THE DATA. This step includes editing, coding, tabulation and processing of collected data. The Schedules are required to be edited during the field survey for necessary corrections. After the survey was complete they are required to be checked again for completeness, accuracy and uniformity. The next step was coding. Different categories were identified into which responses are classified. Then tabulation was done. Data was sorted into different categories and numbers of cases that belong to those categories were counted.
  • 24. 24 PROCESS FLOW OF THE PROJECT DESIGN OF QUESTIONNAIRE
  • 25. 25 PILOTING BASED ON QUESTIONNAIRE AFTER FEEDBACK REDESIGN THE QUESTIONNAIRE QUALITY CHECK GETTING QUESTIONNAIRE FILLED CORRECTION OF DATA DATA ENTRY DATA CLEANING ANALYSIS FINDINGS, RECOMMENDATIONS & CONCLUSION
  • 26. 26 Digram-1 - P R O C E S S F L O W O F T H E P R O J E C T CHAPTER - 4 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
  • 27. 27 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION 4.1 To the Low level Management TABLE 1 A TABLE SHOWING THE FEELING OF THE PHYSICAL WORKING CONDITION OF THE ORGANIZATION Option No of respondents percentage Highly satisfied 6 20% Satisfied 5 17% Neutral 11 36% Dissatisfied 3 10% Highly dissatisfied 5 17% Total 30 100% CHART 1 A CHART SHOWING THE FEELING OF THE ABOUT THE WORKING CONDITION OF THE ORGANIZATION
  • 28. 28 Inference: 20% feel highly satisfied about the working condition of the organization, 17% feel satisfied. 36% feel neutral. 10% feel dissatisfied. 17% feel dissatisfied about the working condition of the organization. TABLE 2 A TABLE SHOWING THE FEELING OF THE PSYCHOLOGICAL WORKING CONDITION OF THE ORGANIZATION Option No of respondents percentage Highly Amicable 4 13% Cordial 1 3% Neutral 7 24% Strained 17 57% Very Poor 1 3% Total 30 100%
  • 29. 29 CHART 2 A CHART SHOWING THE PSYCHOLOGICAL WORKING CONDITION OF THE ORGANIZATION Inference-13% of the respondents feel that the psychological working condition of the organization is highly amicable, 3% of the respondents feels that the psychological working condition of the organization is cordial.24% feels it is neutral, 57% of the respondents feels that the psychological working condition of the organization is strained, and the rest 3% feels it is very poor.
  • 30. 30 TABLE 3 A TABLE SHOWING THE OPINION ABOUT THE TRAINING PROGRAMS CONDUCTED IN THE ORGANIZATION Option No of respondents Percentage Excellent 3 3% Good 4 13% Better 9 30% Bad 5 17% Worse 9 30% Total 30 100% CHART 3 A CHART SHOWING THE OPINION ABOUT THE TRAINING PROGRAMS CONDUCTED IN THE ORGANIZATION Inference- 10% say that the training programs conducted in the organization are excellent.13% of the respondents feels that it is good, 30% of the respondents feels that it
  • 31. 31 is better, 17% of the respondents feels bad about the training conducted in the organization, 30% of the respondents feels that the training programs are worst. TABLE 4 A TABLE SHOWING THE PAY PACKAGES PROVIDED IN THE ORGANIZATION Option No of respondents Percentage Highly satisfied 1 3% Satisfied 6 20% Neutral 5 17% Dissatisfied 15 50% Highly dissatisfied 3 10% Total 30 100% CHART 4 A CHART SHOWING THE PAY PACKAGES PROVIDED IN THE ORGANIZATION Inference- 3% of the respondents feel highly dissatisfied with the pay packages provided in the organization, 50% are dissatisfied with the packages, 17% neither satisfied nor
  • 32. 32 dissatisfied with the packages, 20% of the employees are satisfied with the pay and the rest 3% are highly satisfied with the pay packages provided in the organization. TABLE 5 A TABLE SHOWING THE FEELINGS ABOUT THE JOB Option No of respondents percentage Challenging 2 7% Interesting 1 3% Routine 16 53% Monotonous 9 30% Boring 2 7% Total 30 100 CHART 5 A CHART SHOWING THE FEELINGS ABOUT THE JOB 60% 53% 50% 40% 30% 30% 20% 10% 7% 7% 3% 0% Challenging Interesting Routine Monotonous Boring Inference-7% of the employees feels that the job is challenging, 3% feels the job is interesting, for 53% it is routine, 30% of the respondents feels the job is monotonous, 7% of the employees feel the job is boring.
  • 33. 33 TABLE 6 A TABLE SHOWING THE COMPLETION OF WORK WITHIN SPECIFIED TIME Option No of respondents Percentage Strongly agree 6 20% Agree 4 13% Undecided 14 47% Strongly Disagree 2 7% Disagree 4 13% Total 30 100 CHART 6 A CHART SHOWING THE COMPLETION OF WORK WITHIN SPECIFIED TIME Inference-20% of the employees strongly agrees that they can complete their work within the stipulated time. 13% of them agree that they can, 47% of the employees
  • 34. 34 neither agrees nor disagree, 7% of them strongly disagreed that they can’t, and 13% of the employees disagree that they can complete the work within the stipulated time. TABLE 7 A TABLE SHOWING THE WORK LOAD Option No of respondents Percentage Strongly agree 18 60% Agree 6 20% Undecided 5 17% Strongly Disagree 1 3% Disagree 0 0 Total 30 100 CHART 7 A CHART SHOWING THE WORK LOAD 60% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 20% 17% 10% 3% 0 0% Strongly Agree Undecided Strongly Disagree agree Disagree
  • 35. 35 Inference- 60% of the respondents strongly agree that they are overloaded with work.20% agree that they are overloaded with work. 17% are neutral to the said issue, 3% strongly disagree that they are overloaded with the work. TABLE 8 A TABLE SHOWING THE STESS IN THEIR JOB Options No of respondents Percentage% Yes 30 100% No 0 0 Total 30 100 CHART8 A CHART SHOWING THE STRESS IN THEIR JOB Inference- 100% said they experience stress in their job.
  • 36. 36 TABLE 9 A TABLE SHOWING FACTORS WHICH CAUSE MORE STRESS IN THE JOB Option No of respondents Percentage Roles overload 12 40% Role under load 11 37% Interpersonal relationship 7 23% Total 30 100 CHART 9 A CHART SHOWING FACTORS WHICH CAUSE MORE STRESS IN THE JOB Inference: 40% of the people are overload with stress in the job. 37% of the people are under load with stress in the job. 23% people have interpersonal relationship with the stress in the job.
  • 37. 37 TABLE 10 A TABLE SHOWING THE KIND OF STRESS YOU SUFFER IN YOUR JOB Option No of respondents Percentage Physical 11 37% Mental 11 37% Both 8 26% Total 30 100 CHART 10 A CHART SHOWING THE KIND OF STRESS YOU SUFEER IN YOUR JOB 26% 37% 37% Physical Mental Both Inference: 37% say that they suffer from physical stress from their job.37% say that they suffer from mental stress from their job. 26% say they suffer from both mental and physical stress from their job. TABLE 11
  • 38. 38 A TABLE SHOWING THE LEVEL OF STRESS YOU FEEL IN THE JOB Option No of respondents Percentage Very high 16 53% High 11 37% Moderate 2 7% low 0 0 Very low 1 3% Total 30 100 CHART 11 A CHART SHOWING THE LEVEL OF STESS YOU FEEL IN THE JOB Inference-53% of the employees feels that stress in their job is very high.37% people feel that stress in their job is high. 7% feel it is moderate. 20% feel that stress in their job is low. 3% feel that stress in their job is very low.
  • 39. 39 TABLE12 ATABLE SHOWING PHYSICAL INCONVENIENCE CAUSED DUE TO STRESS Option No of respondents percentage Yes 21 70% No 9 30% Total 30 100 CHART12 ACHART SHOWING PHYSICAL INCONVENIENCE CAUSED DUE TO STRESS Inference- 70% says yes to physical inconvenience caused due to stress.30% say no to physical inconvenience caused due to stress.
  • 40. 40 TABLE 13 A TABLE SHOWING THE KIND OF INCONVIENIENCE CAUSED IN THEIR JOB Option No of respondents Percentage Headache 14 46% High blood pressure 6 20% Digestive problem 6 20% Hypertension 2 7% Nervousness 2 7% TOTAL 30 100 CHART 13 A CHART SHOWING THE KIND OF INCONVIENIENCE CAUSED IN THEIR JOB Inference-46% say they have headache due to stress in job, 20% have high blood pressure, 20% say they have digestive problem, 7% say they have hypertension due to job stress and 7% feels nervousness while doing job.
  • 41. 41 TABLE14 A TABLE SHOWING PERSONAL COPING STRATEGIES TO MANAGE STRESS Option No of respondents Percentage Yes 22 73% No 8 27% Total 30 100 CHART14 A TABLE SHOWINGPERSONAL COPING STRATEGIES TO MANAGE STRESS 27% 73% Yes No Inference-73% say yes to the coping strategies to manage stress. 27% say no to the coping strategies to manage stress TABLE 15
  • 42. 42 A TABLE SHOWING KIND OF STRATEGIES WHICH PEOPLE IN THE JOB HAVE TO TAKE Option No of respondents percentage Exercise 4 13% Meditation 11 37% Listening music 12 40% Take a walk 2 7% Spend time with children 1 3% Total 30 100 CHART15 A CHART SHOWING KIND OF STRATEGIES WHICH PEOPLE IN THE JOB HAVE TO TAKE Inference 13% said that exercise is a good strategy to reduce stress, 37% said that meditation is a best strategy, 40% said that listening to music is a better way to control stress, 7% said it is walking, 3% say spending time with children. TABLE16
  • 43. 43 A TABLE SHOWING STEPS TAKEN TO MANAGE STRESS 0ption No of respondents Percentage Yes 13 43% No 17 57% Total 30 100 CHART16 A CHART SHOWING STEPS TAKEN TO MANAGE STRESS Inference-43% said that the management is taking steps to manage stress, 57% said that the management is not taking steps to reduce stress. TABLE 17 A TABLE SHOWING THE COMPANY-WIDE PROGRAMS THAT COULD BE ADAPTED TO MANAGE STRESS Option No of respondents percentage Employee counseling 8 27%
  • 44. 44 Effective Training & Development program 12 40% Autonomous work groups 1 3% Health clubs 3 10% Transport subsidy 6 20% Total 30 100 CHART 17 A CHART SHOWING THE COMPANY-WIDE PROGRAMS THAT COULD BE ADAPTED TO MANAGE STRESS 20% 27% 10% 3% 40% Employee counseling Effective Training & Development program Autonomous work groups Health clubs Transport subsidy Inference 27% say employee counseling is the best program that could be adapted to manage stress.40% say training and development program is the best program that could be adapted to manage stress.3% autonomous work groups is the best program that could be adapted to manage stress, 10% say health clubs is the best program that could be adapted to manage stress.20% say health clubs is the best program that could be adapted to manage stress.
  • 45. 45 4.2 To the Mid level Management TABLE 1 TABLE SHOWING THE EXPERIENCE Option No of respondents percentage 3-5 Years 11 22% 5.1-7 Years 12 24% 7.1-9 Years 10 20% above 9 Years 17 34% Total 50 100 CHART 1 CHART SHOWING THE EXPERIENCE
  • 46. 46 Inference:-22% is of 3-5 experience. 24% is of 5.1-7 years of experience.20% is of 7.1-9years of experience. 34%is of above 9 years of experience. TABLE 2 TABLE SHOWING THE MARITAL STATUS OF WORKING PERSONS Option No of respondents Percentage Yes 25 50% No 25 50% Total 50 100% CHART 2 CHART SHOWING THE MARITAL STATUS OF WORKING PERSONS 50% 50% Yes No Inference-50% of the respondents is married and the rest 50% of the respondents are unmarried.
  • 47. 47 TABLE 3 TABLE SHOWING THE EFFECT IN BALANCINGTHE WORK LIFE Option No of respondents Percentage Strongly agree 11 22% Agree 12 24% Neutral 13 26% Disagree 14 28% Strongly disagree 0 0 Total 50 100% CHART 3 CHART SHOWING THE EFFECT IN BALANCINGTHE WORK LIFE
  • 48. 48 Inference-22% of the respondents strongly agree that the marital status has effect in balancing the work life of the respondents, 24% agree the statement, 26% is neutral to the issue, 26% disagree this. TABLE 4 TABLE SHOWING LEVEL OF STRESS IN THE ORGANIZATION Option No of respondents percentage Very Heavy 11 22% Heavy 11 22% Normal 13 26% Low . 14 28% Very low 1 2% Total 50 100 CHART 4 CHART SHOWING LEVEL OF STRESS IN THE ORGANIZATION
  • 49. 49 Inference: 22% of the respondents feel that they experience very heavy stress in the organization, 22% told that it is heavy, for 26% the stress level is normal, for 28% it is low and for the rest 25% of the respondents the level of stress is very low. TABLE 5 TABLE SHOWING THE GROWTH OF STRESS ALONG WITH THE RESPONSIBILITY LEVEL Option No of respondents Percentage Yes 25 50% No 25 50% Total 50 100 CHART5 CHART SHOWING THE GROWTH OF STRESS ALONG WITH THE RESPONSIBILITY LEVEL No Yes 50% 50%
  • 50. 50 Inference-50% people say that the stress grows along with the responsibility level 50% it is not. TABLE6 TABLE SHOWING THE DRIVING FORCE IN THE WORKPLACE Option No of respondents Percentage Strongly agree 15 30% Agree 13 26% Neutral 7 14% Disagree 8 16% Strongly Disagree 7 14% Total 50 100 CHART6 TABLE SHOWING THE DRIVING FORCE IN THE WORKPLACE
  • 51. 51 Inference-30% Strongly agree the fact that stress is the driving force in the organization, 26% agree the fact, 14% neither agree nor disagree to the statement, 16% of the respondents disagree the statement, 14% of the respondents strongly disagree the statement. TABLE7 TABLE SHOWING PERSONAL PROBLEMS AFFECT THE JOB IN WORKPLACE Option No of respondents Percentage Strongly agree 15 30% Agree 13 26% Neutral 8 16% Disagree 7 14% Strongly Disagree 7 14% Total 50 100 CHART7 CHART SHOWING PERSONAL PROBLEMS AFFECT THE JOB IN WORKPLACE
  • 52. 52 Strongly 14% Disagree 14% Disagree 16% Neutral 26% Agree 30% Strongly agree 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% Inference-30% strongly agree that the personal problems affect the job in workplace.26% agree that personal problems affect the work in the work place, 16% of the respondents are neutral to the statement. 14% disagrees and the rest 14% strongly disagree to the point. TABLE 8 A TABLE SHOWING RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MID LEVEL, LOWER LEVEL EMPLOYEES AND THE HIGH AUTHORITIES Option No of respondents Percentage Very good 13 26% Good 12 24% Fair 10 20% Poor 10 20% Very Poor 5 10% Total 50 100 CHART 8
  • 53. 53 A CHART SHOWING RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MID LEVEL, LOWER LEVEL EMPLOYEES AND THE HIGH AUTHORITIES Inference-26% says the relationship between the mid, lower level employees and the high authorities is very good. 24% says the relationship between them and the lower level employees and the high authorities is good.20% says the relationship is fair. 20% says the relationship is poor. 10% says the relationship is very poor TABLE 9 TABLE SHOWING YOUR SATISFACTION LEVEL IN THE CURRENT JOB Option No of respondents percentage Highly Satisfied 13 26% satisfied 14 28% Neutral 13 26% dissatisfied 5 10% Highly Dissatisfied 5 10% Total 50 100 CHART 9 CHART SHOWING YOUR SATISFACTION LEVEL IN THE CURRENT JOB
  • 54. 54 10% 26% 10% 26% 28% Highly Satisfied satisfied Neutral dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Inference-26% are highly satisfied with their current job.28% are satisfied, 26% are neutral on the issue, 10% are dissatisfied by the current job. 10% are highly dissatisfied with their job. TABLE 10 TABLE SHOWING THE STRESS SYMPTOM Option No of respondents percentage Highly Satisfied 13 26% satisfied 14 28% Neutral 13 26% dissatisfied 5 10% Highly Dissatisfied 5 10% Total 50 100 CHART 10
  • 55. 55 CHART SHOWING THE STRESS SYMPTOM 10% 26% 10% 26% 28% Highly Satisfied satisfied Neutral dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Inference-26% are highly satisfied with their current job.28% are satisfied, 26% are neutral on the issue, 10% are dissatisfied by the current job. 10% are highly dissatisfied with their job. 4.3 To the top level Management TABLE 1 TABLE SHOWING THE STRESS MANAGEMENT Options No of respondent Percentage % Counseling 0 0 Yoga 4 20%
  • 56. 56 Pranayama 2 10% By Meditating 13 65% By Other ways 1 5% Total 20 100 CHART 1 CHART SHOWING STRESS MANAGEMENT 5% 0 20% 10% 65% Counseling Yoga Pranayama By Meditating By Other ways Inference 65% of the respondents feel that meditating is the best way to manage job stress, 20% of the respondents feels that yoga is the best stress controller, for 10% of the respondents it is pranayama, 5% responded variously. TABLE 2 TABLE SHOWING THE NECESSITY OF STRESS MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME
  • 57. 57 Options No of respondent Percentage % Yes 11 55% No 9 45% Total 20 100% CHART 2 CHART SHOWING THE NECESSITY OF STRESS MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME 55% 60% 45% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Yes No Inference: 55% of the respondents feel that stress management programme is useful for the organization; rest 45% of the respondents feels it is not required. TABLE 3 TABLE SHOWING THE STRESS MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME Options No of respondent Percentage % Yes 18 90% No 2 10%
  • 58. 58 Total 20 100% CHART 3 CHART SHOWING REASONS FOR PREFERING BRANDED RETAIL STORES 10% 90% Yes No Inference: 90% of the respondents told that their organization have stress management programmes, 10% of them said no, they don’t have. TABLE 4
  • 59. 59 TABLE SHOWING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CURRENT STRESS MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME. Options No of respondent Percentage % Strongly agree 38 63% Agree 22 37% Neutral Total 60 100% CHART 4 CHART SHOWING USAGE OF BRANDED PRODUCTS No 37% Yes No Yes 63% Inference 63% of the respondents told that they are using branded goods and 37% said they are not.
  • 60. 60 TABLE 5 TABLE SHOWING THE USAGE OF BRANDED PRODUCTS Options No of respondent Percentage % Personal care products 16 27% Apparels 18 30% Groceries 5 8% Food Products 11 18% Soft Drinks 3 5% All 4 7% Others 3 5% Total 60 100%
  • 61. 61 CHART 5 TABLE SHOWING THE USAGE OF BRANDED PRODUCTS Personal care products 7% 5% 5% 27% Apparels Groceries Food Products 18% Soft Drinks 8% 30% All Others Inference: It is clear that 27% people go for brand in personal care products, 30% in apparels, 8% in groceries, 18% in food products, 5% in soft drinks, 7% of the customers go for all branded goods, and the rest 5% told the mixed answers.
  • 62. 62 TABLE 6 TABLE SHOWING THE TIME SPENT ON PURCHASE Options No of respondent Percentage % Willing to spend time 26 43% Not willing to spend time 34 57% Total 60 100% CHART 6 CHART SHOWING THE TIME SPENT ON PURCHASE
  • 63. 63 Inference: From the research it is known that 43% of the respondents are enjoying the purchase and want to spend more time on purchase and the rest 57% are not willing to spend time but want to purchase TABLE 7 TABLE SHOWING SHOPPING TIME Options No of respondent Percentage % On week days 5 8% Only if time permits 17 28% Definitely on weekends 21 36% Willing to spent on week ends but having no time 17 28% Total 20 100% CHART 7
  • 64. 64 CHART SHOWING SHOPPING TIME Inference: From the research it is clear that 36% of the respondents definitely shop on weekends, 28% go only if time permits, 28% are willing to go on weekends but ends with lapse in time 8% of the respondents go for shopping only on week days. TABLE 8 TABLE SHOWING THE VISIT OF CITI CENTRE, SPENCER Options No of respondent Percentage % Yes 51 85% No 9 15% Total 60 100% CHART 8 CHART SHOWING THE VISIT OF CITI CENTRE, SPENCER
  • 65. 65 15% Yes No 85% Inference: 85% of the respondents visited citi center and Spencer, and 15% of the respondents said no they haven’t. TABLE 9 TABLE SHOWING FREQUENCY OF VISITS OF SHOPPING MALLS Options No of respondent Percentage % Visit regularly 22 37% Visit Occasionally 30 50% Want to visit regularly, but having no time 8 13% Total 60 100% CHART 9 CHART SHOWING FREQUENCY OF VISITS OF SHOPPING MALLS
  • 66. 66 Inference: 58% of the respondents visit the shopping malls occasionally, 37% visit regularly and 13% want to visit regularly but having no time. TABLE 10 TABLE SHOWING PREFERENCE OF SHOPPING MALLS Options No of respondent Percentage % Recreation 6 10% Ambience 5 8% All under one roof 18 30% Quality branded products 12 20% Variety of products 10 17% All the above 9 15% Total 60 100% CHART 10
  • 67. 67 CHART SHOWING PREFERENCE OF SHOPPING MALLS 15% All the above 17% Variety of products 20% Quality branded products 30% All under one roof Ambience 8% 10% Recreation 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% Series1 Inference: From the above chart it is clear that 10% of the respondents prefer them for recreation, 8% for ambience, 30% feels that they are getting all products under one roof, 20% for availability of quality branded products, 17% for variety of goods and the rest 15% feels that they are getting all the benefits. TABLE 11 TABLE SHOWING SPENDING WHILE SHOPPING IS EXPENSIVE BUT REASONABLE Options No of respondent Percentage % Yes 40 67% No 20 33% Total 60 100% CHART 11 CHART SHOWING SPENDING WHILE SHOPPING IS EXPENSIVE BUT REASONABLE
  • 68. 68 Inference: 67% of the respondents said spending while shopping is expensive but reasonable and 33% said it’s not reasonable. TABLE 12 TABLE SHOWING INCOME PER ANNUM Options No of respondent Percentage % < 4 Lakhs 21 35% 4-5 Lakhs 15 25% 5-6 Lakhs 12 20% > 6 Lakhs 12 20% Total 60 100% CHART 12 CHART SHOWING INCOME PER ANNUM
  • 69. 69 Inference: 35% of the total respondents’ total annual income is less than 4 lakhs, 25% between 4 to 5 lakhs, 20% between 5 to 6 lakhs and the rest 20% are getting more than 6 lakhs. 4.4 Retailers TABLE 13 TABLE SHOWING ENRTY BARRIER FOR RETAILERS Options No of respondent Percentage % Stiff competition 16 54% High Taxes 4 13% Government policies & restrictions 7 23% Location constraint 3 10% Total 30 100% CHART 13
  • 70. 70 CHART SHOWING ENRTY BARRIER FOR RETAILERS 60% 54% 50% 40% 30% 20% 23% 13% 10% 10% 0% competition High Taxes Government restrictions Stiff policies & constraint Location Inference: 54% of the respondents feel that stiff competition is the barrier of entry for retailers, 13% high taxes, 23% government policies & restrictions and the location constraint is the main barrier. TABLE 14 TABLE SHOWING KEY FACTORS TO BE CONCENTRATED Options No of respondent Percentage % Location of the shop 12 39% Reference for specific products 2 7% Queue handling in the bill counter 8 27% Frequent price discounts 8 27% Total 30 100% CHART 14
  • 71. 71 TABLE SHOWING KEY FACTORS TO BE CONCENTRATED Inference: 39% feels that location of the shop is the key factor to be concentrated, 7% feels it is reference for specific products, 27% queue handling in the bill counter and 27% feels that it is frequent price discounts. TABLE 15 TABLE SHOWING THE DRIVER FOR INDIAN RETAIL INDUSTRY Options No of respondent Percentage % High income opportunities 11 37% Changing Attitude 7 23% International Exposure 6 20% Necessities to lifestyle 3 10% Market & Government 3 10% Total 30 100%
  • 72. 72 CHART 15 CHART SHOWING THE DRIVER FOR INDIAN RETAIL INDUSTRY Market & Government 10% Necessities to lifestyle 10% International Exposure 20% Changing Attitude 23% High income opportunities 37% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% Inference: 37% of the retailers feel that high income opportunities are the major driver for Indian retail industry, 23% changing attitude, 20% international exposure, 10% necessities to lifestyle and the rest 10% feels that Government & market is the key driver. TABLE 16 TABLE SHOWING EFFECT ON SALES DURING FESTIVE SEASONS Options No of respondent Percentage % Yes 29 97% No 1 3% Total 30 100% CHART 16 TABLE SHOWING EFFECT ON SALES DURING FESTIVE SEASONS
  • 73. 73 3% No 97% Yes 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Inference: 97% of the retailers feel that festival seasons affect the sales volume and 3% says ‘NO’ TABLE 17 TABLE SHOWING MANAGEMENT DECISION ON COMPLAINTS Options No of respondent Percentage % Strongly agree 10 33% Agree 4 13% Neutral 3 10% Disagree 5 17% Strongly disagree 8 27% Total 30 100% CHART 17
  • 74. 74 CHART SHOWING MANAGEMENT DECISION ON COMPLAINTS 27% Strongly agree 33% Agree Neutral Disagree 17% Strongly disagree 13% 10% Inference: 33% of the retailers strongly agree that management takes immediate steps to sort out the complaints raised by the customers,13% agree,10% said neutral answer,17% disagree and the rest 27% strongly disagree. Industry Expert TABLE 18 TABLE SHOWING THE REASON FOR SUDDEN BOOM OF RETAIL INDUSTRY Options No of respondent Percentage % Increased purchase behavior of buyers 6 60% Increase in product variety 2 20% Increase in Economies of scale 0 0 Others 2 20% Total 10 100% CHART 18 CHART SHOWING THE REASON FOR SUDDEN BOOM OF RETAIL INDUSTRY
  • 75. 75 20% Increased purchase behavior of buyers 0 Increase in product variety Increase in Economies 20% 60% of scale Others Inference: 60% of the experts feel that increased purchase behaviour of buyers is the main reason for sudden retail boom,20% due to increase in product variety and 10% said mixed answers. TABLE 19 TABLE SHOWING KEY CHALLENGES FACED BY RETAIL SECTOR Options No of respondent Percentage % Location 3 30% Merchandise 1 10% Pricing 2 20% Target Audience 3 30% Scale of Operation 1 10% Total 10 100% CHART 19 CHART SHOWING KEY CHALLENGES FACED BY RETAIL SECTOR
  • 76. 76 Inference: 30% of the experts feel that location is the key challenge faced by the retail sector, 10% feels it is due to merchandise, 20% due to pricing, 30% because of target audience and 10% feels that it is scale of operation. TABLE 19 TABLE SHOWING REAL ESTATE REASON FOR RETAIL BOOM Options No of respondent Percentage % Yes 4 40% No 6 60% Total 10 100% CHART 19 CHART SHOWING REAL ESTATE REASON FOR RETAIL BOOM
  • 77. 77 40% Yes No 60% Inference: 40% of the experts feel that real estate is the major reason for retail boom and 60% disagree this. TABLE 19 TABLE SHOWING THE SHOP LOCATION Options No of respondent Percentage % Investigate alternate trading areas 2 20% Determine the type of desires store location 3 30% Evaluate alternative specific store sites 2 20% Others 3 30% Total 10 100% CHART 19 CHART SHOWING THE SHOP LOCATION
  • 78. 78 Inference: Mixed responses got.
  • 79. 79 CHAPTER - 5 FINDINGS FINDINGS:
  • 80. 80 • Most of the respondents have very less experience of long association with the organization. • Almost all the respondents are neutral with the physical and psychological working condition of the organization, and only fewer respondents are dissatisfied with the psychological working condition of the organization. • The opinion about the training programs conducted by the organization is almost better, according to majority of the respondents. • Almost all the respondents are satisfied with the pay package provided by the organization and nearly half of the respondents feel that they do a routine job. • Most of the respondents agree that they can complete their work within the specified time and some of the respondents are undecided. • Nearly half of the respondents agree that they are overloaded with work. • More than half of the respondents suffer stress in their job. • Among all other factors, role overload cause more stress according to most of the respondents. • Most of the respondents from steels department suffer from physical stress; most of the respondents from accounts department suffer from mental stress, and most of the respondents from civil department suffer from both physical and mental stress. • Most of the respondents feel only moderate level of stress and some of the respondents feel high level of stress in their job. • More than half of the respondents have physical inconvenience due to stress and most of the respondents suffer from headache and high blood pressure. • Almost all the respondents prefer to follow coping strategies personally, to manage stress and they prefer to do meditation and yoga to reduce stress. • Most of the respondents say that the organization does not take suitable steps to manage stress.
  • 81. 81 CHAPTER - 6 SUGGESTIONS SUGGESTIONS
  • 82. 82 Thus from the above findings of the study it can be concluded that youths working at call centers are facing more stress and leading to various health problems. Boys and girls follow various healthy habits to manage their stress and keep their body and soul fit. Some of the suggestions are:  Employees should be provided training in time management techniques so as to avoid last minute rush in accomplishing the given targets which induces stress.  Organizations should provide facilities like gym, yoga, library etc. to relieve the stress.  Employees should be given awareness about healthy food habits and also seen they are accessible to healthy food in the organization round the clock.  Provide good working condition like room lighting, air conditioning, seating etc.  BPOs should have a strong counseling center which provides consultation to the employees for all their problems and grievances.  Many tasks can be delegated to subordinates without losing effectiveness so that we can reduce the overload of work.  Adopt the work to home transition strategy. It means instead of carrying the pressures of the work to home, the suggestion is to start the unwinding process during the work day and enter the home in a relaxed and peaceful mind.  Giving counseling to the employees when they face problems, because counseling is the discussion of a problem that usually has emotional content with an employee in order to help the employee cope within better.
  • 83. 83 CHAPTER - 7 RECOMMENDATIONS RECOMMENDATIONS
  • 84. 84  The organization must introduce Employee Assistance Programmes (EAPs) and stress control workshops accordingly to the level of employees, because there is a strong relation between the level of stress and level of employees. EAP includes counseling employees who seek assistance on how to deal with alcohol and drug abuse, managing personal finances, handling conflicts at the work place, dealing with marital and other family problems, and coping with health problems.  Employees should be given frequent breaks with limited monitoring during breaks.  Companies should encourage final year students to take up training during their studies so that they gain industry exposure and they can share the work of their boss.  Company can take their employees for outdoor visit like hill stations so that they get relief and also motivated.
  • 85. 85 CHAPTER - 8 CONCLUSION CONCLUSION
  • 86. 86 Without stress there would be no life at all. We need stress, but not too much stress for too long (distress). Our body is designed to react to two types of stress. Good stress helps keep us alert, motivates us to face challenges, and drives us to solve problems. These low levels of stress are manageable and can be thought of as necessary and normal stimulation. Problems can occur when over activation of the sympathetic system is unnecessary. What we all need is to learn how to approach matters in more realistic and reasonable ways. Strong reactions are better reserved for serious situations. Manageable reactions are better for the everyday issues that we all have to face Thus, it can be safely stated that “Stress Management” has become one of the most critical factors in today’s world also specially in an organization’s working today and it will gain more important as the market becomes more and more competitive. Organization must begin to manage people at work differently, treating them with respect and valuing their contribution. If we enhance the psychological well being and health of the employees, in the coming future the organization would make more revenue as well as employee retention. Because it is said that, “A Healthy Employee is a Productive Employee”
  • 87. 87 CHAPTER - 9 BIBLIOGRAPHY BOOKS
  • 88. 88 1. Ahuja. K.K- “Industrial psychology and organizational behavior”, Khanna publishers, New Delhi, 1991. 2. Biswanath Ghosh- “A new look organizational behavior”, Himalaya Publishing House New Delhi, 1994. 3. Finemann- “A Psychological Model of Stress and its application to managerial unemployment”, Human relations, 1979. 4. Ghosh P.K. and Ghorpade M.B. - “Industrial and Organizational Psychology”, Himalaya Publishing House, Bombay 1991. 5. Kapur S.K, Punia B.K.-“Organizational Behavior and Management”, S.K.Publishers, New Delhi. 6. Laurie J. Mullins – “Organizational Behavior”, Pitman’s publishing Ltd, London, 1990. 7. PaulHersey, Kenneth H. Blanchard, Dewey E. Johnson –“Organizational Behavior”, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd, 1998. 8. Srivastava.A.K, “A study of Roll Stress Mental health relationship a moderator by adopted coping strategies, psychological studies”, 1991. 9. Stephen P. Robbins, “Organizational Behavior”, Prentice Hall, U .K. 1999. JOURNALS AND MAGAZINES 1. Business line, “The stress is beginning to show”, Financial Express published by Hindu, Trivandrum, 1989. 2. Brief A.P. and Atieth J.M., “Studying Job Stress: Are we making mountains out of mole Hills?” Journal of occupational behavior, 1987. 3. Jamal M., “Job Stress-Prone Type A behavior and personal and organizational consequences”, Canadian Journal of Administrative. 4. Dr.Satish Chandra Pandy, “Indian ways of winning Stress”, The Journal of Indian Management and Strategy, 1997. WEBSITES:
  • 89. 89 • www.holisticonline.com – Introduction to stress, type of stressors, depression. • www.stress.about.com – Recent Research Findings: Job Satisfaction vs. Sick Leave and /or Absenteeism • www.mindtools.com – job stress network, stress training. • www.mftrou.com – The 7 best stress management techniques I know! – Motivation At Work: How To Recharge your Work • www.managingstress.com – institution guidance – How to overcome from stress. • www.questia.com • www.ezinearticles.com – Tips to Reduce Your Stress Levels by Ewen Chia Ti Wah – 5 Techniques to Cope With Stress in Your Life by Lynn Zingel – 5 Tips to Reduce Stress & Guilt by Victoria Cook – Stress and How it Effects Different People by Phil Ruebins
  • 90. 90 CHAPTER-10 APPENDICES
  • 91. 91 Questionnaire To the Lower Level Management 1. How do you feel about the physical working condition of the organization? Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly dissatisfied Dissatisfied 2. How do you feel about the psychological working condition of the organization? Highly Amicable Cordial Neutral Strained Very poor 3. What is your opinion about the training programs conducted in the organization? Excellent Good Better Bad Worse
  • 92. 92 4. How do you feel about the pay package provided by the organization? Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly dissatisfied Dissatisfied 5. How do you feel about your job? Challenging Interesting Routine Monotonous Boring 6. Do you agree that you can complete your work within the specified time? Strongly agree Agree Undecided Strongly Disagree Disagree 7. Do you agree that you are overloaded with work? Strongly agree Agree Undecided Strongly Disagree Disagree 8. Do you suffer any stress in your job? Yes No 9. In your accordance which of the following factors cause more stress? Roles overload Role under load Interpersonal relationship
  • 93. 93 10. What kind of stress do you suffer in your job? Physical Mental Both 11. What is the level of stress that you feel in your job? Very high High Moderate Low Very low 12. Do you suffer any physical inconvenience due to stress in your job? Yes No 13. If yes, what kind of inconvenience? Headache High blood pressure Digestive problem Hypertension Nervousness 14. Have you taken any coping strategies personally to manage stress? Yes No 15. What kind of strategies of the following have you taken? Exercise Meditation Listening music Take a walk Spend time with children 16. Does your organization take any suitable steps to manage stress? Yes No
  • 94. 94 17. What type of company-wide programs that are/could be adapted to manage stress? Employee counseling Effective Training & Development program Autonomous work groups Health clubs Transport subsidy 18. Kindly give your suggestions to reduce stress……………………………… MIDDLE MANAGEMENT 1. What is your year of experience? a. 3-5 Years b. 5.1-7 Years c. 7.1-9 Years d. above 9 Years 2. Marital Status. a. Yes b. No 3. Marriage has effect in balancing the work life. a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Neutral d. Disagree e. Strongly Disagree 4. What is your level of stress in the organization?
  • 95. 95 a. Very Heavy b. heavy c. Normal d. Low e. Very low 5. Do you feel the growth of stress along with the responsibility? a. Yes b. No 6. Stress is the driving force in the workplace to achieve. a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Neutral d. Disagree e. Strongly Disagree 7. Personal problems affect the job in workplace. a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Neutral d. Disagree e. Strongly Disagree 8. Relationship between you, the lower level employees and the high authorities. a. Very good b. Good c. Fair d. Poor e. Very Poor 9. What is your satisfaction level in the current job? a. Highly Satisfied b. satisfied c. Neutral d. dissatisfied e. Highly Dissatisfied 10. What is the symptom during stress at workplace?
  • 96. 96 a. Head Ache b. Depression c. Nervousness d. Forgetfulness e. Eating disorders f. No symptoms TOP MANAGEMENT 1. How are employees managing stress? a. Counseling b. Yoga c. Pranayama d. By Meditating e. By other ways 2. Do you think the stress management programmes are essential for employees? a. Yes b. No 3. Do the organization conduct any stress management programme? a. Yes b. No If yes, are the current stress management programmes are effective?
  • 97. 97 a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Neutral d. Disagree e. Strongly Disagree 4. Did team work reduce the stress? a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Neutral d. Disagree e. Strongly Disagree 5. Do the employees feel that there is lack of support from the superior? a. Always b. Sometimes c. Never 6. Do you appreciate the good work of your employees? a. Always b. Sometimes c. Never 7. How do you appreciate your employees’ good work? a. Incentives b. Gifts at special occasions c. writing mails d. Team outings e. Increment in pay 8. Do your employees feel insecure about their jobs at time? a. Always b. Sometimes c. Never 9. Your Suggestions ……………………………….
  • 98. 98 RESPONSE SHEET

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