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Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
Design Thinking in the Art Room
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Design Thinking in the Art Room

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Design Thinking Ignite presentation for NAEA14

Design Thinking Ignite presentation for NAEA14

Published in: Education
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  • 1. DESIGN THINKING IN THE ART ROOM AMY BONNER OLIVERI ALLENDALE COLUMBIA SCHOOL
  • 2. Design thinking is a methodology for creative problem solving. You can use it to inform your own teaching practice, or you can teach it to your students as a framework for real-world projects. https://dschool.stanford.edu/groups/k12/ What is Design Thinking? #DTK12
  • 3. https://dschool.stanford.edu/groups/k12/wiki/6c04c/Visual_Resources.html DESIGN THINKING A visual guide
  • 4. DESIGN CHALLENGE BUILD A CHAIR FOR A LOWER SCHOOL CLASSROOM USING ONLY CARDBOARD AND PACKING TAPE https://dschool.stanford.edu/groups/k12/wiki/613e8/Creating_Design_Challenges.html
  • 5. Students will empathize with the Lower School students by observing, engaging, and immersing. Students will interview each class group to find out what their ultimate needs and wants are. EMPATHY AND INTERVIEW
  • 6. Students will utilize information gained in the interview phase to create a character composite. Students will observe each classroom for 5-10 minutes at different times of day (before school, break, lunch, end of school). During observation students will take notes, photos, and observations about the room and how it is used. OBSERVATION
  • 7. Students will rapidly test ideas, models, concepts, using white copy paper. Students will work to generate many ideas and think divergently. RAPID PROTOTYPE
  • 8. 1. Let your user experience the prototype. Show don’t tell. Put your prototype in the user’s hands (or your user in the prototype) and give just the minimum context so they understand what to do. Don’t explain your thinking or reasoning for your prototype. 2. Have them talk through their experience. For example, when appropriate, as the host, ask “Tell me what you are thinking as you are doing this.” TESTING PROTOTYPES WITH USERS
  • 9. 3. Actively observe. Watch how they use (and misuse!) what you have given them. Don’t immediately “correct” what your user tester is doing. 4. Follow up with questions. . This is important; often this is the most valuable part of testing. “Show me why this would [not] work for you.” “Can you tell me more about how this made you feel?” “Why?” Answer questions with questions (i.e “well, what do you think that button does”). TESTING PROTOTYPE WITH USERS
  • 10. BUILDING
  • 11. TESTING
  • 12. TESTING THROUGHOUT THE BUILD PROCESS
  • 13. Kindergarteners come in to learn about the building process in a studio art class. They are overheard later in the week outside a different Upper School classroom saying, “Shhhh, be quiet, they’re making chairs in there.” SHARING THE PROCESS
  • 14. CRITIQUE
  • 15. CRITIQUE
  • 16. Shared with permission from the artist http://roryosullivan.com/ Student: “Mrs. Oliveri, I learned so much from this project.” Oliveri: “What did you learn? Student: “I learned how NOT to build a chair.”
  • 17. RESOURCES Go to www.artwitholiveri.com for this presentation and a list of links to help you get started with Design Thinking Thank You, Amy Oliveri @artwitholiveri #dtk12chat

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