Investing in Leadership: Planning For Succession 8 29 08

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Every nonprofit arts organization will face a leadership transition one day. Are you prepared? Learn the key elements of planning for a successful leadership transition.

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  • Investing in Leadership: Planning For Succession 8 29 08

    1. 1. Investing in Leadership: Planning for Succession www.artsalliance.org
    2. 2. Planning for Succession <ul><li>Introductions </li></ul><ul><li>Name </li></ul><ul><li>Affiliation </li></ul><ul><li>What brought you to this session today? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you hope to learn? </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>Why is succession planning important? </li></ul><ul><li>Laying the foundation for leadership transition </li></ul><ul><li>Conducting the search </li></ul><ul><li>Special issues </li></ul><ul><li>Available resources </li></ul>Planning for Succession
    4. 4. Job Satisfaction Findings <ul><li>ED sources of satisfaction: </li></ul><ul><li>Mission </li></ul><ul><li>Relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Engagement w/art </li></ul><ul><li>ED sources of dissatisfaction: </li></ul><ul><li>High importance </li></ul><ul><li>Org’s finances </li></ul><ul><li>Stress/long hours </li></ul><ul><li>Funding req’ts/audiences </li></ul><ul><li>Unhappy with staff </li></ul><ul><li>Low importance </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict with Board </li></ul><ul><li>Low compensation </li></ul><ul><li>Isolation </li></ul>Succession: Arts Leadership for the 21 st Century <ul><li>EL sources of satisfaction: </li></ul><ul><li>Artistic reputation </li></ul><ul><li>Art/community/mission </li></ul><ul><li>Relationships </li></ul><ul><li>EL sources of dissatisfaction: </li></ul><ul><li>High importance </li></ul><ul><li>Org’s finances </li></ul><ul><li>Stress/long hours </li></ul><ul><li>Unhappy with mgmt </li></ul><ul><li>Low compensation </li></ul><ul><li>Low importance </li></ul><ul><li>Funding/program req’ts </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict among staff </li></ul><ul><li>Personnel problems </li></ul>
    5. 5. ED Turnover Timeline 27% of ED plan to retire after current position. 70% of non-retiring ED plan to leave current job within 5 years.
    6. 6. EL Turnover Timeline 91% of ELs plan to leave current job within 5 years.
    7. 7. Succession Readiness 76% of nonprofit arts orgs have no succession plan in place.
    8. 8. <ul><li>Illinois Arts Alliance </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership publications and programs </li></ul><ul><li>Succession: Arts Leadership for the 21 st Century (2002) </li></ul><ul><li>Planning for Succession: A Toolkit for Board Members and Staff of Nonprofit Arts Organizations (2003) </li></ul><ul><li>Filling the Gap: The Interim Executive Director Solution (2005) </li></ul><ul><li>Working Easier: A Toolkit for Board Members and Staff of Nonprofit Arts Organizations (2005) </li></ul><ul><li>Executive Compensation for Illinois Nonprofit Arts Leaders (2005) </li></ul><ul><li>Peer Coaching Circles (launched 2005) </li></ul><ul><li>Mentor Connection Service (launched 2006) </li></ul>
    9. 13. Laying the Foundation for Transition <ul><li>To prepare for succession, organizational leaders should: </li></ul><ul><li>Develop an emergency transition plan </li></ul><ul><li>Foster a culture of evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Make leadership development a priority </li></ul><ul><li>Plan for the transfer of knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Make a dry run: test and evaluate the system before you need it. </li></ul>
    10. 14. The Emergency Transition Plan <ul><li>Who will take the executive director’s place? </li></ul><ul><li>Who will handle the work of the person(s) filling in for the executive director? </li></ul><ul><li>How much authority will the interim executive director have? </li></ul><ul><li>If that authority will be more limited than that of the current executive director, what controls will be put into place? </li></ul><ul><li>Who needs to be informed and how and when will each person or institution be notified? </li></ul><ul><li>Who is authorized to speak on behalf of the organization? </li></ul><ul><li>What financial systems need to be instituted? </li></ul><ul><li>How will the interim executive director and the board get the critical information they need to run the organization? </li></ul><ul><li>At what point, and how, will the board initiate a formal search for a new executive director? </li></ul>
    11. 15. Laying the Foundation for Transition <ul><li>To prepare for succession, organizational leaders should: </li></ul><ul><li>Develop an emergency transition plan </li></ul><ul><li>Foster a culture of evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Make leadership development a priority </li></ul><ul><li>Plan for the transfer of knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Make a dry run: test and evaluate the system before you need it </li></ul>
    12. 16. The Succession Plan <ul><li>Stems from an up-to-date strategic plan. </li></ul><ul><li>Answers the following questions: </li></ul><ul><li>What will your search committee look like and how will it operate? </li></ul><ul><li>How will the staff be involved in the search process? </li></ul><ul><li>How will the current executive director be involved in the search process? </li></ul><ul><li>Will you use an interim executive director? </li></ul><ul><li>Will you use a search firm or outside consultant? </li></ul>
    13. 17. The Search Process <ul><li>Appoint a search committee and clarify its mandate </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a search timeline </li></ul><ul><li>Identify key competencies for the new staff member </li></ul><ul><li>Update the job description </li></ul><ul><li>Create a communications plan </li></ul><ul><li>Announce the opportunity and recruit candidates </li></ul><ul><li>Fill the vacancy on an interim basis (if necessary) </li></ul><ul><li>Screen candidates </li></ul><ul><li>Select candidates and negotiate an agreement </li></ul><ul><li>Manage the transition </li></ul>
    14. 18. Transition Committee <ul><li>Size </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Large enough to be diverse, small enough to be manageable </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Composition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge of, involvement with, commitment to organization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Balance of skills, contacts, points of view </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to work together effectively </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to dedicate necessary time </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Tasks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How will the committee keep the board abreast of its progress? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How many candidates will the committee present to the board? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Staffing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who will ensure the committee’s work gets done expeditiously? </li></ul></ul>
    15. 19. Developing a Communications Plan A good plan includes strategies for how , when and where to communicate: <ul><li>Departing executive’s plans for the future </li></ul><ul><li>Composition, mandate and timeline of search committee </li></ul><ul><li>Job announcement and qualifications </li></ul><ul><li>Progress updates from search committee </li></ul><ul><li>Selection of a successor (with background information on their experience and qualifications) </li></ul><ul><li>Successor’s vision for the organization </li></ul>
    16. 20. Barriers to Greater Involvement of Young African Americans as Arts Organization Leaders <ul><li>Overall organizational development </li></ul><ul><li>Perception of low status and low pay </li></ul><ul><li>Schism between generations and subtle discrimination </li></ul>
    17. 21. Suggestions for Change <ul><li>Create executive apprenticeship opportunities within your organization for existing staff and for other organizations’ existing staff </li></ul><ul><li>Aggressively recruit young African Americans from both colleges and arts management programs, as well as from the local artist community </li></ul><ul><li>Develop and enforce term limits and mandatory sabbaticals for existing leaders, and use young African Americans as “acting” staff when possible. </li></ul>
    18. 22. Succession Planning for Founders <ul><li>Talk to the founder about succession </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How long do you see yourself running this organization? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do you want the organization to survive beyond your tenure? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Help the founder plan for retirement by contributing to a retirement plan </li></ul><ul><li>Recruit board and staff with the potential to assume greater responsibility </li></ul><ul><li>Honor the founder </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Name a building or space in their honor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Establish an award or scholarship named for the founder </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create an honorary position </li></ul></ul>
    19. 23. Succession Planning Resources <ul><li>www.ArtsAlliance.org </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning for Succession: A Toolkit for Board Members and Staff of Nonprofit Arts Organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Filling the Gap: The Interim Executive Director Solution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Coming soon: Human Resources toolkit for small & midsize organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>www.BoardSource.org </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Drucker Foundation Self-Assessment Tool Set </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hiring the Chief Executive </li></ul></ul><ul><li>www.ArtsBiz-Chicago.org </li></ul><ul><ul><li>smARTscope assessment tool </li></ul></ul>
    20. 24. Investing in Leadership: Planning for Succession www.artsalliance.org

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