La Linea: the story of (de-) hypification

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This presentation shows my idea about combining sudden hypes and Guerrilla Marketing with building an authentic (non hype) reputation. It shows my quest for combining fun and impact with authenticity, transparency and operational excellence. In other words: bridging the gap between hype and identity. The whole presentation is a personal fetish of lines and graphs, La Linea would be proud of me :-) It starts super simple and ends complex. It explains a lot about Life Cycle Analysis in communication and marketing. It is super visual without much text. Have fun!

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La Linea: the story of (de-) hypification

  1. 1. la linea the story of (de-) hypification: bridging the gap between hype and identity © TOTAL IDENTITY 2010 Total Active Media Martijn Arts
  2. 2. Total Identity Activities Areas Positioning Consultancy Profiling Design Publishing Founded Interaction 1963 TOTAL DESIGN PR Campaign 2000 changed name TOTAL IDENTITY Earnings 2005 10,7 mln Group 2006 11,9 mln TOTAL IDENTITY 2007 14,2 mln - Amsterdam 2008 13,4 mln - The Hague TOTAL ACTIVE MEDIA Network partners ALLCOMMUNICATION Antwerp SOFTWARE Bolzano Bremen Dubai © TOTAL IDENTITY No staff 112 Hamburg Lisboa Madrid Taipei 2
  3. 3. Martijn Arts Lives in Amsterdam Born in 1973 MsC Delft Tech. University marts@totalactivemedia.nl Total Active Media Managing Director. Total Identity Shareholder Board of directors Social Networks LinkedIn © TOTAL IDENTITY Hyves Twitter (arts118) 3
  4. 4. I love lines and graphics... © TOTAL IDENTITY
  5. 5. And I know someone... © TOTAL IDENTITY
  6. 6. Who loved lines too... © TOTAL IDENTITY
  7. 7. He created a character in 1969 called La Linea. BRUNETTO DEL VITA presents: LA LINEA di O.CAVANDOLI © TOTAL IDENTITY
  8. 8. And who better than La Linea... © TOTAL IDENTITY
  9. 9. Can explain my newest little theory © TOTAL IDENTITY
  10. 10. A theory that starts with a line. © TOTAL IDENTITY
  11. 11. And ends in a graphic. © TOTAL IDENTITY
  12. 12. So here it comes. © TOTAL IDENTITY
  13. 13. La Linea presents my line. © TOTAL IDENTITY
  14. 14. © TOTAL IDENTITY A time line .
  15. 15. With another axis in reach. © TOTAL IDENTITY
  16. 16. In early days, a news event was spread only via word of mouth. The reach was limited. reach event time © TOTAL IDENTITY
  17. 17. As time went by, more and more means of communication were introduced. A news event had more reach and faster at it’s peak of reach. community local reach event time © TOTAL IDENTITY
  18. 18. More and more reach because of printed media, mail services and telegraph. The reach went beyond communities. Mass media was introduced. large audiences community local reach event time © TOTAL IDENTITY
  19. 19. Mass media like radio and television made it possible to reach almost everyone within a short period. everyone large audiences community local reach event time © TOTAL IDENTITY
  20. 20. The resulting graph is exactly the same as is used in life cycle analysis. This can be used to describe the different types of people to target in communication. everyone large audiences community local event innovators early adopters early majority late majority laggards 2,5% 13,5 % pragmatists conservatists 16 % 34 % 34 % © TOTAL IDENTITY Life Cycle Analysis
  21. 21. Mass media became so expensive that a clear gap was introduced between local and community news and broadcasted news. everyone large audiences community local event innovators early adopters early majority late majority laggards 2,5% 13,5 % pragmatists conservatists 16 % 34 % 34 % © TOTAL IDENTITY A gap appears between local and public
  22. 22. Two separate forms of communication were introduced: local and community communication and broadcasting and mass media. With a big gap in between. everyone corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local event innovators early adopters early majority late majority laggards 2,5% 13,5 % pragmatists conservatists 16 % 34 % 34 % © TOTAL IDENTITY Broadcast gap
  23. 23. This gap is now fillled in by online channels. A local event can become world news based on uniqueness, impact and creativity in communication. everyone corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local event innovators early adopters early majority late majority laggards 2,5% 13,5 % pragmatists conservatists 16 % 34 % 34 % © TOTAL IDENTITY Bridging the gap making use of online channels
  24. 24. Creativity in online communication results in more use of blogs, guerrilla techniques and viral spreading using social media. And the good think is...This theory also holds for organizations! The term ‘event’ can be used for a news event, a live event or gathering but also and organization. The only thing that changes is everyone the timeframe and corporate perspective. large audiences targeted community focus groups local organisation guerrilla social media campaign post campaign niche blogs event innovators early adopters early majority late majority laggards 2,5% 13,5 % pragmatists conservatists 16 % 34 % 34 % © TOTAL IDENTITY
  25. 25. What happens now is that the public changes. More and more people are used to a changing environment. More and more (young) people adapt to the ever changing input by becoming more adoptive and innovative. This results in changing use of modern AND traditional forms of commmunication. everyone corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local organisation guerrilla social media campaign post campaign niche blogs event innovators early adopters majority late majority laggards pragmatists conservatists © TOTAL IDENTITY Changing public more dynamic and innovative
  26. 26. (a lot more) Than half of the public is more and more used to a changing environment. And they expect brands and organizations to change accordingly. While remaining recognizable and authentic... everyone corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local organisation guerrilla social media campaign post campaign niche blogs event innovators early adopters majority late majority laggards pragmatists conservatists © TOTAL IDENTITY Change is the new equilibrium for a future audience
  27. 27. And it also leads to hypification of communication. Events spread extraordinarily within fast. 48 hrs enormous reach everyone corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local organisation guerrilla social media campaign post campaign niche blogs event innovators early adopters majority late majority laggards % % pragmatists conservatists % % % © TOTAL IDENTITY Hypes spread fast because of social media
  28. 28. But the hype also dies out fast. The damage is than done - sometimes permanently - but focus of within the public is on other hypes. Viral spreading 24 hrs starts to look like a locust plague: it appears, it’s gone demolishes and is gone.... everyone corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local organisation guerrilla social media campaign post campaign blogs event innovators early adopters majority late majority laggards % % pragmatists conservatists % % % © TOTAL IDENTITY And die out... even faster
  29. 29. And the (late) majority and laggards don’t even know that something happened. And are happy (late) majority with that. No need for all that fuss.... and laggards everyone corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local organisation guerrilla social media campaign post campaign blogs event innovators early adopters majority late majority laggards % % pragmatists conservatists % % % © TOTAL IDENTITY while many don’t even know...
  30. 30. A new late majority appears that follow other sources. They do not follow the hypes but rely on more steady sources. Sources that the have commitment and loyalty to: branded sources. Lots of times these sources are ‘old” brands that have earned their trust in the past. everyone corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local organisation guerrilla social media campaign post campaign niche blogs event innovators early adopters majority late majority laggards % % pragmatists conservatists % % % © TOTAL IDENTITY so they fall back on trusted and branded sources
  31. 31. A gap appears between the hype sensitive market and the majority that is left behind. They follow more classical means of communication and are less hype sensitive. This group is not so innovative but gain in strength and influence. They don’t follow hypes directly but slowly adapt to new impulses and remain loyal everyone to brands. corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local organisation guerrilla social media campaign post campaign niche blogs event innovators early adopters majority late majority laggards % % pragmatists conservatists % % % © TOTAL IDENTITY A gap appears early adopters vs. (late) majority
  32. 32. This adoption gap spilts society almost in two: young versus old, sensitive to exposure versus more to themselves, extravert versus introvert, innovative and adaptive versus conservatives. But more and more pragmatists stop following the hypes... everyone corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local organisation guerrilla social media campaign post campaign niche blogs event innovators early adopters majority late majority laggards % % pragmatists conservatists % % % © TOTAL IDENTITY Adoption gap
  33. 33. One approach is to focus on the hype sensitive market. When one hype lifts of you start thinking about the next one. So there it is: the market works from hype to hype. A stressed market that is scattered in effect. Effects that die out soon and cost energy. everyone corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local © TOTAL IDENTITY From hype to hype a strenuous approach
  34. 34. For a dynamic (future?) public this creates a new equilibrium that you could call identity. In literature this is often faslely called “brand flow”. I call this the hypification of a brand. everyone corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local © TOTAL IDENTITY The hype approach working from hype to hype for a hype sensitive audience
  35. 35. My problem with the focus on a hype sensitive public - and the reason why I do not call this “brand flow” - is that you miss a group that is becoming larger and larger. This more conservative public follows classic principles. Maybe in the future everyone is dynamic but not now. So do not leave out this large audience. A new approach is needed. everyone corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local © TOTAL IDENTITY Classic identity approach building up an identity (slowly) for a less hype sensitive public
  36. 36. In stead of focussing on one or the other I advice to combine the two: use hypesensitive means of communication like guerrilla aimed at the right target audience to revitalize the brand and gain impact. Use programatic publishing and durable communication to involve the majority. Be persistent, direct the unexpeted, work in everyone programs corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local © TOTAL IDENTITY Bipolar approach solid reputation management and guerrilla/social media impact
  37. 37. This results in a durable reputation that also makes use of impact caused by hypesensitive campaigns and ‘scoops’. This is depicted by the yellow line. everyone corporate large audiences targeted community focus groups local © TOTAL IDENTITY Bipolar approach solid reputation management and guerrilla/social media impact
  38. 38. The result of a bipolar approach is an organisation that can be op top of things and works and communicates at its best. Itt is an organization or brand in “brand flow”. It follows it’s autheticity but also uses impact (hype) for activating and reactivating the brand. But combining reputation management and impact the organisation rules it’s own everyone fate. corporate So do it! state of “brand flow” large audiences targeted community focus groups resulting communication life cycle local © TOTAL IDENTITY Bipolar approach solid reputation management and guerrilla/social media impact
  39. 39. everyone corporate state of “brand flow” large audiences targeted community focus groups resulting communication life cycle local © TOTAL IDENTITY
  40. 40. I hope Osvaldo Cavandoli is proud of this use of lines... everyone corporate state of “brand flow” large audiences targeted community focus groups resulting communication life cycle local © TOTAL IDENTITY
  41. 41. fine © TOTAL IDENTITY 2010 Total Active Media Total Identity 41 Martijn Arts

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