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Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth
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Data driven medicine - Perspectives on mHealth

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Presentation in Data Driven Medicine conference, March 2012, Tampere/Finland …

Presentation in Data Driven Medicine conference, March 2012, Tampere/Finland
http://www.datadrivenmedicine.fi/data-driven-medicine/

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
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  • 1. Perspectives on mHealth business development Arto Leppisaari Tampere University of Technology Data‐Driven Medicine 28.3.2012
  • 2. Project FelixResearch‐based business development project Department of Biomedical Engineering Tampere University of Technology Part of the new research group focusing into Personal Health Technologiesfor chronic disease management and prevention
  • 3. ContentmHealth promise on chronic disease challengePersonal health monitoringBehavior changeMass market adoption barriers
  • 4. ”World is ready for mHealth” 77% of the disease burden in Europe are accounted for disorders related to lifestyles 17,000 health and medical apps available 1 billion smartphone users by 2016 for download30% downloads at least one mHealth application 30% of doctors in US are using smartphone or  tablets in daily work 500 mHealth projects ongoing worldwide, showing that‐ costs related to data collection can be reduced by 24%.‐ costs in elderly care can be reduced by 25% Source: “Socio‐Economic Impact of mHealth”, Boston Consulting Group  and Telenor, Research2guidance, WHO
  • 5. 5 Personal Health Monitoring Philips DirectLifeWithings Wellness Diary Weight Activity Daily Activity Weight Blood pressure Exercise Nutrition Sleep … Zeo SportsTracker 2.4.2012
  • 6. Ease‐to‐use connected sensors everywhere169.5 million wearable wireless health and fitness sensors sold in 2017, up from 21 million in 2011.~90% supporting mobile phone connectivity, compared to 5% currently[ABI Research] NFC and Low Energy Bluetooth 4.0 technologies deployed in the majority of smartphones by the end of 2012  Tapping – new, intuitive way to interact  Wearable wireless sensors with long operating times Nike+ Fuelband VTT HearMeFeelMe
  • 7. Data aggregation Open interfaces Connectivity platforms Standard interfacesPersonal Health Record (PHR) Standardised interfaces
  • 8. Quantified SelfIt’s about understanding yourself, who you are, through numbers Compare Share
  • 9. Health outcomes are largely produced by the citizen behaviors Determinants of  health status 70–90% of cardiovascular  disease, type II diabetes and  stroke would be avoided with  Social (15%) healthy lifestyles (Willet, 2002) Environmental (5%) Behavioral (40%) Health Care Lifestyle is very personal and  (10%) impacted by complex  motivational and value‐based Genetic (30%) factors McGinnis et al., Health Affairs 21(2), 2002
  • 10. Knowledge‐behavior gap Most citizen have sufficient information about healthy lifestyles but this information does not transform into behaviors It is unlikely that more information alone would significantly improve the situation Human being is not a rational actor Most of our daily behaviors are automatic decisions
  • 11. “Put hot triggers in the path of  motivated people” B.J Fogg Triggers http://designwithintent.co.uk/ http://persuasive‐patterns.com/
  • 12. Right moment and incentive
  • 13. Easy, fast feedback ‐ deep insights
  • 14. mHealth adoption curve? Get through the day 11% Not right now 24% I need a plan 20% Value Independence 19% In it for Fun 17% Leading the Way 10%Health & Wellness segmentation in US[The Future Company] Diffusion of innovations [Rogers]
  • 15. Healthcare provider role in mHealth mass market adoption Prescription Evidence based Provider engaged Shared cost
  • 16. Case example: Exercise is medicine • Healthcare professional supervised,  evidenced based exercise program for  cardiac prevention and rehabilitation. • Exercises could be done at home, but currently health insurance support only gym training
  • 17. Take away messages Technology infrastucture ready for mHealth To efficiently prevent and manage lifestyle diseases, a  behavioral change is needed. Citizen need to take  responsibility on own health We need solutions that make the healthy choice the easy choice. Persuasive technology as a great tool. Mobile Health need to be incorporated into healthcare  practices in order to create mass market adoption  Making the healthy choice the default choice
  • 18. Tampere University of Technology Personal Health Technologiesfor chronic disease management and prevention Contact us!

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