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The Metaphors We Manage By

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A presentation to the \"New Media, New Audiences\" conference in Dublin, Ireland, November 25, 2008

A presentation to the \"New Media, New Audiences\" conference in Dublin, Ireland, November 25, 2008

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  • 1. The Metaphors  We Manage By Andrew Taylor, Director Bolz Center for Arts Administration www.bolzcenter.org Wisconsin School of Business University of Wisconsin­Madison ataylor@bus.wisc.edu
  • 2. presented November 25, 2008 at the  “New Media, New Audiences” conference  in Dublin, Ireland hosted by  The Arts Council / An Chomhairle Ealaíon www.artscouncil.ie
  • 3. Here’s the Plan • Short introduction • Metaphors and models • Three premises • Two problematic metaphors for the arts: • Container | Boundary • Production | Consumption • So what?
  • 4. Here’s the theory... • Technology does not create anything new. • It just reveals dynamics that were always  there, but latent or obscured.
  • 5. Who is this guy?
  • 6. Models & Metaphors  (three premises)
  • 7. premise 1: We engage the world through models and metaphors.
  • 8. We can’t have the world in our head.
  • 9. So we create little simulations, models, and metaphors.
  • 10. case in point: the door handle
  • 11. case in point: the door handle
  • 12. case in point: the door handle
  • 13. case in point: the door handle
  • 14. case in point: the door handle
  • 15. case in point: the door handle
  • 16. premise 2: Our models are always wrong.
  • 17. Framing & Selective Abstraction (you can’t have the world  in your head...remember?)
  • 18. “All models are wrong... some models are useful.” George Box
  • 19. premise 3: Structures, even mental  ones, inNluence behavior.
  • 20. “We shape our buildings,  and afterwards our  buildings shape us.” Winston Churchill
  • 21. “I thought this was about  cultural management and  new technologies.” someone in the room
  • 22. The Box Ofice
  • 23. Metaphor: A Bank Teller Window
  • 24. re‐conceived...but not much...
  • 25. ...even when banks have moved on.
  • 26. Does this metaphor inluence behavior... of audiences, staff, management? What models does it reinforce?
  • 27. The Three Premises • We engage the world through models and metaphors. • Those models are always wrong  (but often useful). • Structures, even mental ones,  inluence behavior.
  • 28. Container | Boundary
  • 29. Canvas Theater Auditorium Museum Compact Disc The Container The Arts Organization Gallery DVD Festival Grounds Pub / Bar
  • 30. Canvas Theater Auditorium Museum Compact Disc The Container The Arts Organization Gallery DVD Festival Grounds Pub / Bar
  • 31. Canvas Theater Auditorium Museum Compact Disc The Container The Arts Organization Gallery DVD Festival Grounds Pub / Bar
  • 32. Canvas Theater Auditorium Museum Compact Disc The Container The Arts Organization Gallery DVD Festival Grounds Pub / Bar
  • 33. A useful iction.
  • 34. Box OfNice Rental Gate Purchase The Boundary Bouncer Donor’s Circle Toll Skybox
  • 35. Extracting value at the boundary
  • 36. Building new boundaries
  • 37. Who chooses? Who beneits? Who pays?
  • 38. YouTube pays sync rights on behalf of its users (on­line rights in UK are up 40%)
  • 39. Production | Consumption
  • 40. Presenter Education Producer Production | Consumption Outreach Audience Development
  • 41. Consider a meaningful arts moment of your own.
  • 42. All meaning is co‐created or co‐produced.
  • 43. “Without an act of  recreation the object is  not perceived as a work of art.” John Dewey, Art as Experience, 1934
  • 44. So what?
  • 45. What do we do when  “traditional” boundaries & thresholds move or dissolve?
  • 46. What if all value is co‐created?
  • 47. What if our current management metaphors are no longer useful? (they were always wrong, but usefully so)
  • 48. Two metaphors to chew on...
  • 49. Honey Mushroom (Armillaria ostoyae)
  • 50. “...museums’ collections and  acquisitions, while remaining  in the direct ownership of individual  institutions, could also be viewed as  contributing to the nation’s  ‘public collection’ as a single resource  under the custodianship of many  individual museums.” UK Dept. for Culture, Media, and Sport “Understanding the Future,” 2005 
  • 51. Lightening in a Field John Dewey, Art as Experience
  • 52. What would an arts ecology look like that embraced those  two metaphors?
  • 53. Who better than the arts to discover that ecology?
  • 54. What’s the next useful iction?
  • 55. Andrew Taylor www.artfulmanager.com ataylor@bus.wisc.edu

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