Social style self perception workshop

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  • Welcome participants and stress the importance of active participation
    Briefly review the history of SOCIAL STYLE
    Cite the proven effectiveness of increased Versatility (e.g., Sales and Management studies)
    Additional information and statistics can be obtained from The SOCIAL STYLE Profile – Technical Report
  • Today, I want to use this time together to give you some tools that can help you to be more effective immediately and improve your long-term effectiveness.
     
    Going through this session you will:
    • Gain a working understanding of the SOCIAL STYLE Model
    • Determine your SOCIAL STYLE based on completing a self-perception questionnaire
    • Increase your understanding of their behavior and how others tend to view people with your Style
    • Learn some ways to use your SOCIAL STYLE in order to be more productive with others
    In our experience it’s critical that individuals understand their own behavior and how it affects others. So we’re going to do an exercise that will hopefully provide you with valuable insights about yourself. You’re each going to complete a self-profile of your SOCIAL STYLE. With that knowledge as a foundation, we’ll then look at how you can work more effectively with others.
  • So that we are all using terms that mean the same thing, here are some basic definitions as they are used in Style Awareness session.
    Behavior is what you say (verbal) and do (non-verbal).
    Interpersonal Behavior is what you say and do when interacting with one or more people.
    SOCIAL STYLE is a particular pattern of actions that others can observe and agree upon for describing one’s behavior.
    Personality is the combination of ideas, values, hopes, dreams, attitudes, abilities, as well as the behavior that others can observe that encompasses everything a person is.
    Emphasize that SOCIAL STYLE and Personality are not the same thing.
  • “SOCIAL STYLE is determined by observable behaviors—that is, the actual things that we “say and do.” These are objective and quantifiable, and descriptions of them by different observers do not vary widely.”
     
    Review the different types of behavior shown on the slide and in the Self-Perception Guide.
  • Now, let’s walk through the SOCIAL STYLE model because it sets the stage for our discussion of improving your interpersonal effectiveness.
     
    There are three parts to the SOCIAL STYLE Model. The first is known as the Assertiveness scale and it refers to whether a person tends to ask or tell in their interactions with others. Those that tell more than others fall on the right half of the scale with those that ask on the left.
     
    In this context, assertiveness is not related to what you might consider assertiveness training such as being forceful. Rather it’s simply whether a person tends to ask more or tell more in their interactions with others.
  • The second scale is the Responsiveness scale. This measures how a person displays their emotions and feelings when working with others. The top end is for those that tend to control their emotions, while the bottom end is for those that show their feelings or emote.
  • By putting the Assertiveness and Responsiveness dimensions together we end up with the SOCIAL STYLE Model. The model is comprised of four quadrants and four distinct SOCIAL STYLES.
    Starting in the upper right, people who are Control Responsive and Tell Assertive are the Driving style.
    People who are Tell Assertive and Emote Responsive have an Expressive Style.
    The Amiable Style people are Ask Assertive and Emote Responsive and the Analytical Style people are Control Responsive and Ask Assertive.
    At this point, it’s important to note that there is no good or bad style.
  • Now before we see how to deal with each Style, let’s find out what Style each of you are.
    Let’s score your own questionnaires. (FOLLOW BULLETS)
    (After scoring is complete, ask the following question.)
    Anyone surprised? Any questions or concerns?
    (SHOW OF HANDS FOR EACH STYLE)
    The SOCIAL STYLE Self-Perception Profile reflects how you see yourself. Keep in mind, that others may see you differently. To identify the extent of any differences, a Multi-Rater Profile, which allows others to complete a similar questionnaire about you, is required. TRACOM’s research indicates that as many as 50% of those who complete Self-Perception Questionnaires differ in their perceptions from their reference groups (such as co-workers) who complete a Multi-Rater Profile about them.
    The format of this session didn’t allow for a full multi-rater profile, but if anybody is interested in completing one, give me your card or send me an e-mail and I’ll arrange for you to complete an online profile.
  • Discuss Key Reminders per bullet points. Ask if there are any questions.
    Your challenge: Take the initiative to establish and build effective relationships with others.
  • Now, let’s look at the things you can do to improve the effectiveness of your interactions with others. There are four steps.
    Know Yourself: Know the impression you make on others, and how your behavioral preferences can cause tension for others
    Control Yourself: Take action to ensure that your Style preferences do not interfere with your interpersonal effectiveness
    Know Others: Observe others' behaviors to learn their Style and associated behavioral preferences
    Do Something For Others: Take action to accommodate the other person’s Style to help make interpersonal communication effective for them
  • While identifying your SOCIAL STYLE can help you understand your behavioral preferences, by itself, knowing your Style doesn’t necessarily help you be more effective. As I’ve said, there is no good or bad Style. What is important is how you use your Style when working with others. That’s where Versatility, the third major component of the SOCIAL STYLE Model, comes in. Versatility is the overall impact that you have on others in the area of Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback.
    Unlike Style, there is good and “not-so good” Versatility or as you see here, high and low Versatility.
    When you behave in a way that makes others comfortable with your behavior, your Versatility increases. When you do things for your own comfort or benefit, your Versatility decreases.
  • Before we discuss Versatility, I’d like you to score your Versatility Self-Perception Questionnaire.
     
    (After scoring is complete, ask the following question.)
     
    Is anyone surprised? Are there any questions or concerns?
     
    The Versatility Self-Perception score reflects how you see yourself. Keep in mind that others may see you differently.
  • Versatility is not a behavior itself, but an effect your behavior has on others. Versatility is made up of four components: Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback. 
    Image is your dress, grooming, appearance, and even your work area. Image is particularly important early in a relationship. 
    Presentation is your ability to communicate effectively. Organizing ideas, speaking clearly, and using appropriate language.  
    Competence is your mastery of skills and knowledge appropriate to the given situation. Creativity, flexibility, timeliness, and conscientiousness contribute to competence.
    Most important is Feedback. Do you use clear and accurate verbal and non-verbal feedback to promote mutual understanding? By checking for understanding and being sensitive to others’ needs, you increase your Versatility. 
    While Image is important early on, over the long-term, Competence and Feedback are the most important components of Versatility. 
    Note that pages 20-24 in the Self-Perception Guide contain additional information on the components of Versatility and space for beginning a personal action plan. See Optional Exercises if time allows to include this exercise in your Self-Perception session.
  • Exercise: Identify the Facilitator’s Style
    Purpose
    The purpose of this exercise is to give the participants practice in identifying Styles.
    Recommended Time:
    Ten minutes
    Materials Needed
    Skills Guide Card. (Note: this is an optional resource. Contact TRACOM for ordering information.)
    Directions
    Pass out the Skills Guide Cards and give participants a minute or so to review the Style characteristics in an attempt to identify your Style.
    Require participants to mention at least two behaviors along each scale that you have exhibited in class to support their conclusion.
    Tell the participants that the Skills Guide Card can be used as a quick reference to identify their co-workers’ Styles.
  • Style Observation Rules
    Purpose
    The purpose of this exercise is to familiarize participants with the six rules for identifying another person's SOCIAL STYLE.
    Recommended Time:
    Ten minutes
    Materials Needed
    Handout: Style Observation Rules (See Self-Perception Resource CD-ROM.)
    Directions
    Pass out the handout: Style Observation Rules and give participants a minute or so to review the six rules.
    Explain why the Style Observation Rules are important:
    The more accurately you are able to observe your colleagues’ Styles, the better you will be able to adapt your behavior and “Do something for others” (the fourth of the four steps for improving your interpersonal effectiveness) and earn the support and respect of others.
    It is important to understand that observing other’s behavior in order to determine their style is not an automatic or mechanical process. Just like any other skill, it takes practice.
    It helps to keep in mind the six rules to aid you in this process.
    Ask participants if they have any questions about the rules.
    Tell the participants that the handout can be used as a quick reference when identifying their co-workers’ Styles.
  • Optional Exercise: Style Forum
    Purpose
    The purpose of this exercise is to give participants an opportunity to describe what it is about the opposite SOCIAL STYLE position that creates tension for them when working with people of that Style and to develop insights into how to be more productive with a person who has that Style.
    Recommended Time
    30 minutes
    Materials needed
    None
    Directions
    Break participants into groups by SOCIAL STYLE position with a maximum of six per group.
    Give each group 10 minutes to discuss and develop a list of behaviors that the opposite SOCIAL STYLE position manifests to create tension that leads to unproductive relationships.
    After each group has developed its list, ask the Amiable and Driving Styles to get together to share their lists. Ask the Expressive and Analytical Styles to do the same thing. Each Style should spend five to ten minutes sharing its list and answering clarifying questions. Caution the groups that this is not a time to get defensive.
    After each group has heard the others’ list, the original groups should get together by themselves to discuss what they can do to interact better with the opposite Style (e.g., those with Expressive Styles would develop a list of what they could do to make the relationship more productive with Analytical Styles). As each group shares its list of what it could do better, the opposite Style group should provide feedback and suggestions as to how appropriate the lists are.
    After all groups have shared their information with the opposite Style, the whole class discusses what has been learned.
    At the conclusion of the exercise, each group should have valuable information as to how to behave more appropriately with the diagonal Style. In addition, after the general class discussions, each style should have valuable information for working with each of the other SOCIAL STYLE positions.
  • Developing Actions Toward Others Using the “Improving Personal Effectiveness with Versatility” Guide
    Purpose
    The purpose of this exercise is for participants to learn about Style preferences as they relate to the ABCs of Style and to develop an actionable list of what they can do to improve their interpersonal relationship with a person of their choosing.
    Recommended Time
    40 minutes
    Materials Needed
    One Improving Personal Effectiveness with Versatility guide per participant (Note: this is an optional resource. Contact TRACOM for ordering information.)
    Flipchart
    Directions
    Set up the exercise (3 minutes)
    Ask participants to think of a person with whom they work and with whom they would like to have a better working relationship. Note: there is no need to name them.
    Ask participants to think about what the probable Style of that person is based on things they have observed this person saying and doing.
    Divide the participants into four groups separated by the Style of the person they are thinking about.
    Distribute a copy of Improving Personal Effectiveness with Versatility guide to each participant.
    Ask participants to read about the Style of the person they are thinking of by turning to the appropriate page in their Improving Personal Effectiveness with Versatility guide. (5 minutes)
    Driving Style: Page 5-6
    Expressive Style: Page 7-8
    Amiable Style: Page 9-10
    Analytical Style: Page 11-13
    (write page numbers on the flipchart)
    Answer any questions that participants might have about the information in the guide. Use the flipchart as necessary. (10 minutes)
    Based on what they have read in the Self-Perception Guide, ask participants to develop a list of specific actions that they can take to improve their relationship with this person in each of the ABC areas: Actions toward others, Best use of time, and Customary approach to decision-making. (5 minutes)
    After five or 10, ask participants to share their action items with members of their group and to discuss and fine-tune them based on the input and feedback they receive.
    Suggest that when participants return to work that they carry out the items on their lists. (10 minutes)
  • Developing Actions Toward Others Using the Style Dial
    Purpose
    The purpose of this exercise is to provide participants with a tool for applying Style concepts at work.
    Recommended Time
    30 minutes
    Materials Needed
    One TRACOM Style Dial for each participant (Note: this is an optional resource. Contact TRACOM for ordering information.)
    Flipchart (optional)
    Directions
    Ask participants to think of a person with whom they work and with whom they would like to have a better working relationship. Note: there is no need to name them.
    Ask participants to think about what the probable Style of that person is based on things they have observed this person saying and doing.
    Divide the participants into four groups separated by the Style of the person they are thinking about.
    Distribute a “Style Dial” to each participant. Give participants five minutes to review the dial position of the person they are thinking about.
    Take up to 10 minutes to answer any questions that participants might have about the information on the Style Dial. Use the flipchart as necessary.
    Based on what they have read on the Style Dial, ask participants to list four or five actions that they can take to improve their relationship with this person.
    After five minutes, ask participants to share their action items with members of their group and to discuss and fine-tune them based on the input and feedback they receive.
    Suggest that when participants return to work that they carry out the items on their lists.
  • Strategies for Doing Something for Others Exercise
    Purpose
    The purpose of this exercise is to provide participants with specific strategies for improving their interactions with others
    Recommended Time
    20 minutes
    Materials Needed
    Handout: Strategies for Doing Something for Others (see Self-Perception Resource CD-ROM)
    Flipchart (optional)
    Directions
    Ask participants to think of a person with whom they work and with whom they would like to have a better working relationship. Note: there is no need to name them.
    Ask participants to think about what the probable Style of that person is based on things they have observed this person saying and doing.
    Divide the participants into four groups separated by the Style of the person they are thinking about.
    Distribute “Strategies for Doing Something for Others” information handout.
    Based on what they have read, ask participants to list four or five actions that they can take to improve their relationship with this person.
    After five minutes, ask participants to share their action items with members of their group and to discuss and fine-tune them based on the input and feedback they receive.
    Suggest that when participants return to work that they carry out the items on their lists.
    Review the strategies with participants using the flipchart if needed.
  • Do Unto Others – Accepts/Rejects Card
    Purpose
    The purpose this exercise is to help develop participants’ skills in interacting with people with a Style diagonally opposite to their own.
    Recommended Time
    25 minutes
    Materials Needed
    Do Unto Others – Accepts/Rejects Guide Card (Note: this is an optional resource. Contact TRACOM for ordering information.)
    Flipchart
    Directions
    Distribute a “Do unto others – Accepts/Rejects Guide” card to each participant.
    Divide the participants into four groups by Style.
    Ask each group to do the following: (10 minutes)
    Assume that their group needs to convince a coworker who has a Style diagonally opposite to their own to participate in designing a new company-wide program for acknowledging the contributions of outstanding employees. (i.e. Driving Styles would imagine convincing Amiable Styles)
    Ask participants to use the Accepts/Rejects Guide card to determine how they would approach the person and discuss the project in order to get his or her agreement.
    Have a representative from each group give their solution and have the group with the diagonally opposite Style evaluate the solution. (3 minutes per group)
  • Self-Assessment of Your Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback
    Purpose
    The purpose of this exercise is to help participants better understand their current use of Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback and how that might affect their Versatility score.
    Recommended Time
    20 minutes
    Materials Needed
    Flipchart
    Directions
    Explain the exercise: “To gain a better understanding of your Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback read pages 20-24 in your Self-Perception Guide and answer the questions for each of the four components of Versatility.”
    Give participants approximately 10 minutes to read and answer the questions.
    Take 10 minutes to have participants cite and discuss ways that they identified for themselves for improving their Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback. Write the strategies on the flipchart for all to view.
    Ask participants to add the notes in their Self-Perception Guide good ideas mentioned by others.
  • Social style self perception workshop

    1. 1. Session Introduction: Understanding and Using Your SOCIAL STYLEsm © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    2. 2. Objectives • Gain a working understanding of the SOCIAL STYLE Model™ • Determine your SOCIAL STYLE by completing a Self-Perception questionnaire • Increase your understanding of your behavior and how others tend to view people with your Style • Learn some ways to use your SOCIAL STYLE in order to be more productive with others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    3. 3. Behavior & Personality • • Behavior — What you say (verbal) and do (non-verbal) Interpersonal Behavior — What you say and do when interacting with one or more people Observable Behavior Say/Do Personality • • SOCIAL STYLE— A particular pattern of actions that others can observe and agree upon for describing one’s behavior Personality — The combination of ideas, values, hopes, dreams, attitudes, abilities, as well as the behavior that others can observe that encompasses everything a person is © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    4. 4. Observable Behaviors Traits Honest Intelligent Arrogant Motivated Self-Centered Sincere Critical Observable Behavior I like him. He annoys me. She interests me. He irritates me. I distrust her. I hate him. I trust him. Say Do Quiet Slower-paced Facially controlled Monotone voice Indirect eye contact Casual posture Leans back — — — — — — — Judgments Loud Faster-paced Facially animated Inflected voice Direct eye contact Rigid posture Leans forward © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    5. 5. Assertiveness Asks Tells A dimension of behavior that measures the degree to which others perceive a person as tending to ask or tell in interactions with others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    6. 6. Responsiveness Controls A dimension of behavior that measures the degree to which others perceive a person as tending to control or display his or her feelings and emotions when interacting Emotes © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    7. 7. Analytical Style More Controlling + More Asking Controls SOCIAL STYLE Model Amiable Style More Emoting + More Asking Tells Emotes Asks Driving Style More Controlling + More Telling Expressive Style More Emoting + More Telling © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    8. 8. Your SOCIAL STYLE Self-Perception • Tear open the perforation • Transfer response for each question • Add up column totals • Plot your SOCIAL STYLE EXAMPLE: C Analytical Driving T A Amiable Expressive E Remember, your self-perception may differ from others’ views! © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    9. 9. Key Reminders • There is no best SOCIAL STYLE position • Your Style is not your whole personality • Your Style Profile represents a theme in your performance • Your Style has growth actions • Your challenge: Take the initiative to establish and build effective relationships with others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    10. 10. Improving Your Effectiveness with Others Do Something for Others: Once you know what makes another person comfortable, try to accommodate his/her preferences Know Others: Observe others' behaviors to learn about their tension levels, how they respond to your messages, and what you can do to make the interaction more comfortable and effective Control Yourself: Learn to be tolerant of others’ behavior without becoming tense Know Yourself: Know the impression you make on others, how your behavioral preferences can cause tension for others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    11. 11. Versatility Behaviors Seen as Focusing on My Tension Low Versatility Behaviors Seen as Focusing on Others’ Tension High Versatility Versatility — An overall measure of the effect your Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback have on others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    12. 12. Your Versatility Self-Perception • Tear open the perforation • Add up the check marks in the shaded column • Circle the letter of your Versatility score EXAMPLE: If 7 of less=Low (circle the “L”) If 8-14= Medium (circle the “M”) If 15-21=High (circle the “H”) L M H Remember, your self-perception may differ from others’ views! © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    13. 13. Do Something for Others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    14. 14. Identifying the Facilitator’s Style • Purpose: To give you practice in identifying Styles • Directions: – Read the Skills Guide Cards and identify the facilitator’s Style – Identify at least two behaviors along each scale that the facilitator has exhibited in class to support your conclusion © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    15. 15. Style Observation Rules 1. Avoid trying to define a Style too quickly. If you force Style identification too quickly, you might create a self-fulfilling prophecy. Use a suspended reaction to confirm the validity of observations. Avoid taking sides in an interaction: hang back, get out of the picture as much as possible. 2. Get out of the way. Don’t let your feelings interfere. Concentrate on how the other person is acting. Give people a “second chance” to display more behavior. 3. Avoid early “good,” “bad,” or “why” judgments. Describe a person’s actions objectively, in a way that others can readily agree. For example, the observation that “Charlie sat quietly during the meeting and had an expressionless face” can quickly be verified or denied. 4. Separate Style clues from assigned authority or role. Conclusions based on a person’s role are not necessarily true (e.g., all competitive football players have a Driving Style). 5. Observe others under moderate stress to clarify their Style. Watch people “snap back” to old habits when the situation is uncomfortable, and you will be able to make a more accurate observation. 6. Set the stage for the person being observed. If someone is busy reacting to you and your Style, you will find it very difficult to observe that person’s Style. Give people a chance to show their Styles by allowing them time to display their natural behaviors. © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    16. 16. Style Forum • Purpose: To give you an opportunity to describe what it is about the opposite SOCIAL STYLE position that creates tension for you and to develop insights into how to be more productive with a person who has that Style • Directions: – In your assigned group discuss and develop a list of behaviors that the opposite SOCIAL STYLE exhibits that creates tension for you – Share your list with the group of the opposite Style – In your group discuss what you can do to interact better with the opposite Style – Share your information with the opposite Style and the whole class © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    17. 17. Developing Actions Toward Others Using the IPEV Guide • Purpose: To learn about Style preferences as they relate to the ABCs of Style and to develop an actionable list to improve an interpersonal relationship • Directions: – Think of a person you work with. What is their likely Style? – Read about their ABCs of the Style: Analytical Style: Pages 11-13 Amiable Style: Pages 9-10 Driving Style: Pages 5-6 Expressive Style: Pages 7-8 • List specific actions you can take to improve your relationship with this person in each of the ABC areas • In your group, discuss and fine tune your action items • Use your action list when you return to work © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    18. 18. Developing Actions Toward Others Using the Style Dial • Purpose: To provide you with a tool for applying Style concepts at work • Directions – Think of a person your work with. What is their likely Style? – Review the Style Dial position of that person – Ask your facilitator any questions that you have about the information on the Style Dial – List four to five actions that you can take to improve your relationship with this person – Discuss and fine-tune your action items with members of your Style group © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    19. 19. Strategies for Doing Something for Others • Purpose: To provide you with specific strategies for improving your interactions with others • Directions: – Think of a person you work with. What is their likely Style? – Read the “Strategies for Doing Something for Others” handout – List four or five actions you can take to improve your relationship with this person – Discuss and fine-tune your action items with members of your group © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    20. 20. Do Unto Others— Accepts/Rejects Card • Purpose: To help develop your skills in interacting with people with a Style diagonally opposite to yours • Directions: – Review the “Do Unto Others – Accepts/Rejects Guide” card – In your group: Assume that your group needs to convince a co-worker who has a Style diagonally opposite to your own to participate in designing a new company-wide program for acknowledging the contributions of outstanding employees (e.g., Driving Styles would imagine convincing Amiable Styles) – Use the Accepts/Rejects Guide card to determine how they would approach this co-worker and discuss – Have the diagonally opposite Style evaluate your group’s solution © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
    21. 21. Self-Assessment of Your Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback • Purpose: To help you better understand your current use of Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback and how that might affect your Versatility score • Directions – Read pages 20-24 in your Self-Perception Guide and answer the questions for each of the four components of Versatility – Cite and discuss ways that you identified for improving your Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback – Add to the notes in your Self-Perception Guide good ideas mentioned by others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.

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