• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
The New Digital Disorder
 

The New Digital Disorder

on

  • 1,359 views

The original title of this presentation was: A short introduction on the third order of orders, tagging, collaboration and the crowd, search engine power and catalog failure, distributed resources and ...

The original title of this presentation was: A short introduction on the third order of orders, tagging, collaboration and the crowd, search engine power and catalog failure, distributed resources and centralized registries. It isa brain dump triggered by reading: Everything is Miscellaneous by David Weinberger and the presentation brims with citations from his book, read more at: http://www.everythingismiscellaneous.com/

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,359
Views on SlideShare
1,358
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    The New Digital Disorder The New Digital Disorder Presentation Transcript

    • Hosted by Additional Sponsors: June 2008 Metadata DWG –  The 3rd order of orders 66th OGC Technical Committee   Potsdam, Germany Arnulf Christl June 02, 2008
    • Agenda • Introduction • Scope of this presentation • Three levels of order • Physical objects, catalogs, and digital data • OGC CSW • The Dewey Decimal Library Classification System • Why Categories Fail • Extracting Knowledge from Miscellany Copyright: WhereGroup GmbH & Co. KG. Licensed under GNU FDL http://www.gnu.org/licenses/fdl.txt   and CreativeCommons 3.0 ShareAlike Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 2
    • Introduction The original title of this presentation was:  A short introduction on the third order of orders, tagging,  collaborative methodology, search engine power and failure,  distributed resources and centralized registries  It was nothing but a brain dump triggered by reading:  Everything is Miscellaneous by David Weinberger. This  presentation brims with citations from his book. http://www.everythingismiscellaneous.com/ Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 3
    • Scope of this presentation This presentation shows how meta and data have merged  in the digital realm. Services, clients, software and  architecture are all in place, we have: Structured, Ordered, Categorized, Hierarchical, Meta Data But still we fail to get it to the people! Web 2.0, social networks, tag clouds and the like add value by exposing data and allowing dynamic creation of Knowledge from Data. Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 4
    • Three Levels of Order In a nutshell the book states that: ● The 1st order of orders is about physical things. ● The 2nd order of orders is categories and hierarchies as  implemented by library card catalogs. ● The 3rd order of orders is emerging right now and it  completely redefines our perception of meaning itself.  Meta data catalogs are stuck right there in the second level  of orders. Opening them to the miscellany of the third order  of orders will make them so much more useful. Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 5
    • The 1st Order of Order: Atoms Physical things (atoms) occupy space. This creates a set of  clear rules how to order (and find) things: ● One thing can only be at one location at a time ● One location can only be occupied by one thing ● One thing can hide another one that is behind  ● The number of accessible things is physically limited. In this context space is the limiting factor. The organization of  the 1st order of orders is an art of its own. An office  equipment store uses a different system than a car dealer or  a gas station. All are specialized to their products.  Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 6
    • The 2rd Order of Orders: Catalogs When book printing became commonplace it was suddenly  possible to aggregate knowledge on papers between two  covers and put them in a shelf. Thus knowledge became  physical – with all its limitations.  ● Catalogs helped democratize knowledge by putting  meta data on a card making it much more findable. ● The limited space of a catalog card entry (a few lines)  and the physical space books occupy are natural  physical boundaries to this system.  Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 7
    • The 3rd Order of Orders – Digital Data The great advantage of digital data bears heavy on all our  concepts of matter: ● Information is most valuable when it is thrown into a big,  digital pile to be filtered and organized by users  themselves ● Instead of relying on experts, groups of users are  inventing their own ways of discovering data ● Smart companies do not treat information as an asset  to be guarded, but let it loose to be "mashed up",  gaining market awareness and customer loyalty. Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 8
    • Catalogue Services – Web Catalogs list objects by putting them in a neutral order and  list them in categories. The order typically is:  ● Alphabetical or numerical order (start at one end and  stop at the other). No preferences, no bias, neutral. ● Hierarchies are managed in trees (catalogs) with  branches (categories) and leaves (items). Meaning. Catalogs overcome the inaccessibility of the information  contained in books by exposing much better accessible meta  data. The lines of text on a catalog card are limited and for  better accessibility it gets organized in categories. Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 9
    • Trees, Categories and Hierarchies In the 19th century Melvil Dewey created the three digit  Dewey decimal library catalog numbering system with 9 top  level categories. ● 100s philosophy and psychology (which in that time  were considered to be the foundation of knowledge) ● 200s religion (which in this mindset gave truth) ● 300s social sciences ● 400s language ● 500s natural sciences and math Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 10
    • Categories Fail ● 600s technology and applied science ● 700s arts and recreation ● 800s literature and rhetoric ● 900s geography, history and biography It is still being used today but in many places it is misleading  if not embarrassingly wrong. While "Ural­Altaic, Paleosiberian  and Dravidian" are a top level category (494) the language  spoken by 1.2 billion Chinese is not. It can be changed but –  who decides? Dublin Core, ISO Application Profile, All Fail. Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 11
    • Recap our Traditional View of Knowledge Our traditional view of knowledge goes like this: 1. There is only one reality and only one knowledge. If two  have a different view, one is right, the other is wrong.  2. Knowledge is unambiguous. If something is unclear we  have not understood it.  3. Because knowledge is so big we need experts to filter  and keep bad information away from us. 4. Experts achieve their positions by working their way  through institutions. Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 12
    • New Properties, New Strategies,  New Knowledge The potential miscellany of our digital data has tremendous  power. But to unleash this power it requires us to review our  strategy of knowledge: 1. Filter on the way out not the way in. 2. Put each leaf on as many branches as possible. 3. Everything is meta data and everything can be a label. 4. Give up control. Don't start to argue why this does not work.  Think what good it can do. Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 13
    • New Properties, New Strategies,  New Knowledge The potential miscellany of our digital data has tremendous  digital power. But to unleash this power it requires us to review our  review   t strategy of knowledge: a n  a g   n  g 1. Filter on the way out not the way in. o t  e d   a  & t e 2. Put each leaf on as many branches as possible. possible  d 3. Everything is meta data and everything can be a label. 4. Give up control! Don't start to argue why this does not work.  work Think what good it can do. Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 14
    • Now What? As so often these days, we will not know what happens when  we do that. But as every other so often we will be surprised  at what can be done.  Wikipedia and OpenStreetMap are just flimsy examples  compiled by civilians.  Imagine to what power these technologies and concepts  would rise if they were let loose in the hand of  experts and professionals! Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 15
    • Discussion Thank you for your attention. Copyright: WhereGroup GmbH & Co. KG. Author: Arnulf Christl  WhereGroup GmbH & Co. KG This  presentation  is  dual  licensed  under  GNU  FDL  and  Siemensstr. 8 Creative Commons 3.0 Share Alike. Choose the one that fits  53121 Bonn your needs best. The presentation master, cover pages and  Germany last  page  (this  one)  are  what  the  GNU  FDL  refers  to  as  http://www.wheregroup.com/  invariant sections. Please do not modify these pages without  getting  written  permission  by  the author.  Find  the full  text  of  the GNU FDL at: http://www.gnu.org/licenses/fdl.txt  Helping the World to Communicate Copyleft © 2008, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., All Rights Reserved. Geographically 16