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The wine to pair with turkey
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The wine to pair with turkey

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I would avoid any bold reds, unless the meal features some form of red meat. That means leave the Cabernet Sauvignon in the cellar for a more opportune time. …

I would avoid any bold reds, unless the meal features some form of red meat. That means leave the Cabernet Sauvignon in the cellar for a more opportune time.

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  • 1. www.gourmetrecipe.com "Which wine goes with turkey" is a question that comes up often during the holiday season. My personal choice would be a delicious bottle of Pinot Gris. However, your guests might be with the best strate red wine to a white. I'll list a couple of alternatives below, and let you make your own decision. There are, of course, many wine selections that will go with turkey and traditional holiday meals. If your guests prefer white wines, then Pinot Gris would be the natural choice for a match with turkey. There are many good ones, and you should be able to find a bottle or two at your supermarket in the $10 - $15 range. Another white wine that would win your guests over is a bottle of Viognier, which might be a little harder to find than the Pinot Gris, but is a crisp alternative to the ever-boring Chardonnay. If you usually like wine with a little sweetness, try a White Zinfandel. If you think you'd like to try a dessert wine, you might look for a sparkling Early Muscat or a bottle of Vin Glace made with Pinot Gris grapes. The Vin Glace will usually come in the 375 ml bottle. If your guests prefer red wines, consider a Pinot Noir to go with your turkey. It will have a richer fruit flavor than most white wines, but will match up well with the meal. Pinot Noir is traditionally very smooth, so it will not overwhelm the taste of the food. Look for a bottle from Oregon, California, or France in the $15 - $20 range. Serve Pinot Noir very lightly chilled (about 60 degrees Fahrenheit). Put the Pinot Noir in the refrigerator for about 20 minutes before serving, and you will bring out the fruit flavors and will remove the alcohol taste that can overwhelm when served at room temperature. I would avoid any bold reds, unless the meal features some form of red meat. That means leave the Cabernet Sauvignon in the cellar for a more opportune time.

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