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  • 1. WRA 110.742<br />Week 6: 16 February 2010<br />
  • 2. Welcome Dr. Geissler!<br />The Rhetorical Situation Room: Purpose, Audience, Context<br />Activity: Analyzing a sample student essay<br />Wrap-up<br />Today’s agenda<br />
  • 3. writing =composing=making<br />By the way<br />
  • 4. A crash course in rhetoric<br />WRAC= Writing, Rhetoric, & American Cultures<br />Why do you think these things would be grouped together? <br />So…what is rhetoric? <br />
  • 5. What is Rhetoric, Anyway?<br />Rhetoric is the faculty of observing in any given case the available means of persuasion.<br />Aristotle, On Rhetoric, Book 1, Ch. 1<br />
  • 6. “Every time we use language--in speech or in writing--we engage in a rhetorical act. <br />Another way of saying this would be that all communication is rhetorical. <br />Whenever we use language, we have an intention--a message to communicate or a goal to achieve. <br />All of us behave rhetorically every time we use language.”<br />LeTourneau University, “Introduction to Rhetoric”<br />
  • 7. All Texts Have aPurpose<br />All texts are composed with a purpose, even if that purpose is simply personal entertainment. The purpose is what the text is supposed to do.<br />The text accomplishes its purpose by means of persuasion. <br />All texts can be rhetorical (persuasive with a purpose) because of the way we interact with (read & compose) them.<br />
  • 8. Let’s do this first one together.<br />What’s the purpose?<br />
  • 9. All Texts Have An Audience<br />The audience is who the text is composed to persuade.<br />Audiences are never full, whole, completely real people. They are aspects of people.<br />i.e. I read your blog posts in my “writing teacher aspect” and not in my “daughter aspect” or my “person concerned with social justice aspect” or my “zombie movie fan aspect.”<br />The writer or rhetor(one who “does” rhetoric) composes a text by considering the best ways to persuade the audience. These are called rhetorical strategies.<br />
  • 10. Spend 10 minutes writing about your specific audience for your project.<br />Who is your audience? <br />What aspect(s) of them will you be addressing?<br />What aspect(s) of yourself will you be presenting?<br />Who is your audience?<br />
  • 11. All Texts Have a Context<br />Context is the situation in which the text is composed and in which it is received (read) by the audience.<br />Many things affect context: <br />the culture in which the text is composed and received, <br />the time period in which the text is composed and received, <br />the way the text is delivered,<br />current events, <br />etc. etc. etc…<br />
  • 12. Spend 10-12 minutes writing about the specific context for your project. Answer these questions:<br />What about your culture/your audience’s culture do you think will have an impact on the way you write your text, and how your audience will read it?<br />What about this particular time period/current events/”zeitgeist” do you think will have an impact on the way you write your text, and how your audience will read it?<br />How will your audience actually get their eyes on your text? Be specific and realistic about this. Think about how YOU get your reading materials.<br />What’s the context?<br />
  • 13. Next challenge: How do we turn all of this brainstorming into specific rhetorical strategies (things you can do with your writing) that accomplish your goals?<br />Let’s look at how one successful student writer did it.<br />Go to your MSU Google Docs account and find “SampleStudentEssay2.pdf”. There’s a link to it on today’s post on our website too.<br />Flip it and reverse it<br />
  • 14. Carefully read the sample student essay.<br />In your peer review groups, identify the AUDIENCE, and CONTEXT for this essay. <br />THEN, show that you’ve correctly identified these things by identifying particular rhetorical strategies (things the student does with her writing) as proof.<br />Rhetorical strategies<br />
  • 15. Repent! The Draft is Near!<br />I’m going to change your weekend homework slightly so stay tuned.<br />Next week: More MLA Idol fun, so bring your McGraw-Hill handbook<br />Don’t forget to schedule conferences with me—the F2F conference deadline is approaching<br />Grades are on their way (I promise)<br />Breathe.<br />Wrap-up<br />

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