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LEWIS SYMBOLS AND THE OCTET              RULE The electrons involved in chemical bonding are the valence  electrons   in...
Lewis structures       Lewis (American chemist) proposed that a covalent        bond is formed when 2 neighbouring atoms...
Lewis electron-dot symbols for elements in Periods 2 and 3.• Lewis generalized the bonding behaviour into the Octet Rule w...
THE OCTET RULE Atoms often gain, lose, or share electrons to achieve the  same number of electrons as the noble gas close...
THE OCTET RULE Atoms often gain, lose, or share electrons to achieve the  same number of electrons as the noble gas close...
Three Types of Chemical                   Bonding1. Metal with nonmetal:       electron transfer and ionic bonding2. Nonme...
IONIC BONDING Ionic substances generally result from the interaction of  metals (left side of the periodic table) with no...
 The formation of Na+ from Na and Cl- from Cl2 indicates  that an electron has been lost by a sodium atom and gained  by ...
IONIC BONDING Ionic substances generally result from the interaction of  metals (left side of the periodic table) with no...
COVALENT BONDING The vast majority of chemical substances do not have the  characteristics of ionic materials. G. N. Lew...
Covalent bond formation in H2.
Formation of Covalent bond in H2   Point 1 : Atoms are far apart   Point 2 : Distance between nuclei decreases, each   ...
 The vast majority of chemical substances do not have the  characteristics of ionic materials. G. N. Lewis reasoned that...
 The formation of covalent bonds can be represented with  Lewis symbols. The formation of the H2 molecule from two H ato...
 The vast majority of chemical substances do not have the  characteristics of ionic materials. G. N. Lewis reasoned that...
 For nonmetals, the number of valence electrons in a neutral  atom is the same as the group number. Therefore, one might...
BOND POLARITY AND ELECTRONEGATIVITY Bond polarity is a measure of how equally or unequally the  electrons in any covalent...
 Bond polarity is a measure of how equally or unequally the  electrons in any covalent bond are shared. A nonpolar coval...
 We can use the difference in electronegativity between two  atoms to gauge the polarity of the bond the atoms form.  Con...
 In LiF the electronegativity difference is very large, meaning  that the electron density is shifted far toward F. The ...
DRAWING LEWIS STRUCTURES1. Sum the valence electrons from all atoms.2. Write the symbols for the atoms, show which atoms a...
Draw the Lewis structure for phosphorus trichloride, PCl3.
FORMAL CHARGE The formal charge of any atom in a molecule is the charge  the atom would have if all the atoms in the mole...
1. Formal charges in all three structures sum to -1 , the overall charge of   the ion.2. The dominant Lewis structure gene...
RESONANCE STRUCTURES Sometimes we encounter molecules and ions in which the  experimentally determined arrangement of ato...
 To describe the structure of ozone properly, we write both  resonance structures and use a double-headed arrow to  indic...
• In writing resonance structures, the same atoms must  be bonded to each other in all structures, so that the  only diffe...
EXCEPTIONS TO THE OCTET RULE The octet rule has its limitation in dealing with ionic  compounds of the transition metals....
EXCEPTIONS TO THE OCTET RULE The octet rule has its limitation in dealing with ionic  compounds of the transition metals....
Odd Number of Electrons Vast majority of molecules and polyatomic ions,   the total number of valence electrons is even,...
Less than an Octet of Valence Electrons A second type of exception occurs when there are fewer  than eight valence electr...
• which has only six electrons around the boron atom.• The formal charge is zero on both B and F   • could complete the oc...
Less than an Octet of Valence Electrons A second type of exception occurs when there are fewer  than eight valence electr...
More than an Octet of Valence Electrons The third and largest class of exceptions consists of  molecules or polyatomic io...
Chemical bonding sk0023
Chemical bonding sk0023
Chemical bonding sk0023
Chemical bonding sk0023
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Chemical bonding sk0023

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  1. 1. LEWIS SYMBOLS AND THE OCTET RULE The electrons involved in chemical bonding are the valence electrons  in the outermost occupied shell. The American chemist G. N. Lewis (1875–1946) suggested a simple way of showing the valence electrons in an atom and tracking them during bond formation  as either Lewis electron-dot symbols or simply Lewis symbols. The Lewis symbol for an element consists of the element’s chemical symbol plus a dot for each valence electron. Sulfur has electron configuration [Ne]3s23p4  Six valence electrons.
  2. 2. Lewis structures  Lewis (American chemist) proposed that a covalent bond is formed when 2 neighbouring atoms share an electron pair   A single bond, a shared electron pair (A:B) is denoted as A B  A double bond, two shared electron pairs (A::B) is denoted as A B  A triple bond, three shared pairs of electron (A:::B) is denoted as A B  An unshared pair of valence electrons on an atom (A: ) is called lone pair  Do not contribute directly to bonding  But can influence shape of molecule and chemical properties11/15/2012 3
  3. 3. Lewis electron-dot symbols for elements in Periods 2 and 3.• Lewis generalized the bonding behaviour into the Octet Rule where the rulesstate when atoms are bond, they lose, gain or share electrons to attain a filledouter level of eight (or two) electrons
  4. 4. THE OCTET RULE Atoms often gain, lose, or share electrons to achieve the same number of electrons as the noble gas closest to them in the periodic table. The noble gases have very stable electron arrangements Because all the noble gases except He have eight valence electrons,  many atoms undergoing reactions end up with eight valence electrons. Octet rule:  Atoms tend to gain, lose, or share electrons until they are surrounded by eight valence electrons.
  5. 5. THE OCTET RULE Atoms often gain, lose, or share electrons to achieve the same number of electrons as the noble gas closest to them in the periodic table. The noble gases have very stable electron arrangements Because all the noble gases except He have eight valence electrons,  many atoms undergoing reactions end up with eight valence electrons. Octet rule:  Atoms tend to gain, lose, or share electrons until they are surrounded by eight valence electrons.
  6. 6. Three Types of Chemical Bonding1. Metal with nonmetal: electron transfer and ionic bonding2. Nonmetal with nonmetal: electron sharing and covalent bonding3. Metal with metal: electron pooling and metallic bonding
  7. 7. IONIC BONDING Ionic substances generally result from the interaction of metals (left side of the periodic table) with non-metals (the right side) (#excluding the noble gases, group 8A).  Eg: Sodium metal, Na(s), is brought into contact with chlorine gas, Cl2 (g)  The product of this very exothermic  Product : Sodium chloride, NaCl(s): Sodium chloride is composed of and ions arranged in a three-dimensional array
  8. 8.  The formation of Na+ from Na and Cl- from Cl2 indicates that an electron has been lost by a sodium atom and gained by a chlorine atom NaCl is a typical ionic compound Consists of a metal of low ionization energy and a nonmetal of high electron affinity. Transfer of an electron from the Na atom to the Cl atom. Each ion has an octet of electrons, the octet being the 2s22p6 electrons that lie below the single 3s valence electron of the Na atom. We have put a bracket around the chloride ion to emphasize that all eight electrons are located on it.
  9. 9. IONIC BONDING Ionic substances generally result from the interaction of metals (left side of the periodic table) with non-metals (the right side) (#excluding the noble gases, group 8A).  Eg: Sodium metal, Na(s), is brought into contact with chlorine gas, Cl2 (g)  The product of this very exothermic  Product : Sodium chloride, NaCl(s): Sodium chloride is composed of and ions arranged in a three-dimensional array
  10. 10. COVALENT BONDING The vast majority of chemical substances do not have the characteristics of ionic materials. G. N. Lewis reasoned that atoms might acquire a noble-gas electron configuration by sharing electrons with other atoms. A chemical bond formed by sharing a pair of electrons is a covalent bond. The hydrogen molecule, H2, provides the simplest example of a covalent bond.
  11. 11. Covalent bond formation in H2.
  12. 12. Formation of Covalent bond in H2  Point 1 : Atoms are far apart  Point 2 : Distance between nuclei decreases, each nucleus starts to attract the other atom’s electron which lower the potential energy of the system  Point 3: The attractions increase with some repulsions between nuclei and the electrons. ◦ At some internuclear distance, max. attraction is achieved in the face of increasing repulsion. ◦ System has its min. energy  Point 4 : With shorter distance, repulsion will increase with the rise in potential energy.
  13. 13.  The vast majority of chemical substances do not have the characteristics of ionic materials. G. N. Lewis reasoned that atoms might acquire a noble-gas electron configuration by sharing electrons with other atoms. A chemical bond formed by sharing a pair of electrons is a covalent bond. The hydrogen molecule, H2, provides the simplest example of a covalent bond.
  14. 14.  The formation of covalent bonds can be represented with Lewis symbols. The formation of the H2 molecule from two H atoms can be represented as In forming the covalent bond, each hydrogen atom acquires a second electron, achieving the stable, two-electron, noble- gas electron configuration of helium. In writing Lewis structures, we usually show each shared electron pair as a line and any unshared electron pairs as dots. Written this way, the Lewis structures for H2 and Cl2 are
  15. 15.  The vast majority of chemical substances do not have the characteristics of ionic materials. G. N. Lewis reasoned that atoms might acquire a noble-gas electron configuration by sharing electrons with other atoms. A chemical bond formed by sharing a pair of electrons is a covalent bond. The hydrogen molecule, H2, provides the simplest example of a covalent bond.
  16. 16.  For nonmetals, the number of valence electrons in a neutral atom is the same as the group number. Therefore, one might predict that 7A elements, such as F, would form one covalent bond to achieve an octet; 6A elements, such as O, would form two covalent bonds; 5A elements, such as N, would form three; and 4A elements, such as C, would form four.
  17. 17. BOND POLARITY AND ELECTRONEGATIVITY Bond polarity is a measure of how equally or unequally the electrons in any covalent bond are shared. A nonpolar covalent bond is one in which the electrons are shared equally, as in Cl2 and N2. In a polar covalent bond, one of the atoms exerts a greater attraction for the bonding electrons than the other. If the difference in relative ability to attract electrons is large enough, an ionic bond is formed. Electronegativity is defined as the ability of an atom in a molecule to attract electrons to itself. The greater an atom’s electronegativity, the greater its ability to attract electrons to itself. The electronegativity of an atom in a molecule is related to the atom’s ionization energy and electron affinity
  18. 18.  Bond polarity is a measure of how equally or unequally the electrons in any covalent bond are shared. A nonpolar covalent bond is one in which the electrons are shared equally, as in Cl2 and N2. In a polar covalent bond, one of the atoms exerts a greater attraction for the bonding electrons than the other. If the difference in relative ability to attract electrons is large enough, an ionic bond is formed. Electronegativity is defined as the ability of an atom in a molecule to attract electrons to itself. The greater an atom’s electronegativity, the greater its ability to attract electrons to itself. The electronegativity of an atom in a molecule is related to the atom’s ionization energy and electron affinity
  19. 19.  We can use the difference in electronegativity between two atoms to gauge the polarity of the bond the atoms form. Consider these three fluorine-containing compounds: In HF, the more electronegative fluorine atom attracts electron density away from the less electronegative hydrogen atom, leaving a partial positive charge on the hydrogen atom and a partial negative charge on the fluorine atom. We can represent this charge distribution as
  20. 20.  In LiF the electronegativity difference is very large, meaning that the electron density is shifted far toward F. The resultant bond is therefore most accurately described as ionic. The shift of electron density toward the more electronegative atom in a bond can be seen in the results of calculations of electron density distributions.
  21. 21. DRAWING LEWIS STRUCTURES1. Sum the valence electrons from all atoms.2. Write the symbols for the atoms, show which atoms are attached to which, and connect them with a single bond (a dash, representing two electrons).3. Complete the octets around all the atoms bonded to the central atom.4. Place any leftover electrons on the central atom,5. If there are not enough electrons to give the central atom an octet, try multiple bonds.
  22. 22. Draw the Lewis structure for phosphorus trichloride, PCl3.
  23. 23. FORMAL CHARGE The formal charge of any atom in a molecule is the charge the atom would have if all the atoms in the molecule had the same electronegativity (that is, if each bonding electron pair in the molecule were shared equally between its two atoms).
  24. 24. 1. Formal charges in all three structures sum to -1 , the overall charge of the ion.2. The dominant Lewis structure generally produces formal charges of the smallest magnitude3. N is more electronegative than C or S. Therefore, we expect any negative formal charge to reside on the N atom4. The middle Lewis structure is the dominant one for NCS-.
  25. 25. RESONANCE STRUCTURES Sometimes we encounter molecules and ions in which the experimentally determined arrangement of atoms is not adequately described by a single dominant Lewis structure. Consider ozone, O3, which is a bent molecule with two equal bond lengths Because each oxygen atom contributes 6 valence electrons, the ozone, molecule has 18 valence electrons. This means the Lewis structure must have one O-O single bond and one O=O double bond to attain an octet about each atom: OR
  26. 26.  To describe the structure of ozone properly, we write both resonance structures and use a double-headed arrow to indicate that the real molecule is described by an average of the two: Consider the nitrate ion, NO3 - for which three equivalent Lewis structures can be drawn: Notice that the arrangement of atoms is the same in each structure—only the placement of electrons differs.
  27. 27. • In writing resonance structures, the same atoms must be bonded to each other in all structures, so that the only differences are in the arrangements of electrons.• All three NO3 - Lewis structures are equally dominant and taken together adequately describe the ion, in which all three bond lengths are the same.
  28. 28. EXCEPTIONS TO THE OCTET RULE The octet rule has its limitation in dealing with ionic compounds of the transition metals. The rule also fails in many situations involving covalent bonding. These exceptions to the octet rule are of three main types: 1. Molecules and polyatomic ions containing an odd number of electrons 2. Molecules and polyatomic ions in which an atom has fewer than an octet of valence electrons 3. Molecules and polyatomic ions in which an atom has more than an octet of valence electrons
  29. 29. EXCEPTIONS TO THE OCTET RULE The octet rule has its limitation in dealing with ionic compounds of the transition metals. The rule also fails in many situations involving covalent bonding. These exceptions to the octet rule are of three main types: 1. Molecules and polyatomic ions containing an odd number of electrons 2. Molecules and polyatomic ions in which an atom has fewer than an octet of valence electrons 3. Molecules and polyatomic ions in which an atom has more than an octet of valence electrons
  30. 30. Odd Number of Electrons Vast majority of molecules and polyatomic ions,  the total number of valence electrons is even, and complete pairing of electrons occurs. However, in a few molecules and polyatomic ions, such as ClO2, NO, NO2, and O2- , the number of valence electrons is odd. Complete pairing of these electrons is impossible, and an octet around each atom cannot be achieved. For example, NO contains 5 + 6 = 11 valence electrons. The two most important Lewis structures for this molecule are
  31. 31. Less than an Octet of Valence Electrons A second type of exception occurs when there are fewer than eight valence electrons around an atom in a molecule or polyatomic ion. This situation is also relatively rare (with the exception of hydrogen and helium), most often encountered in compounds of boron and beryllium. As an example, let’s consider boron trifluoride, BF3. Drawing Lewis structures, we obtain the structure
  32. 32. • which has only six electrons around the boron atom.• The formal charge is zero on both B and F • could complete the octet around boron by forming a double bond • In so doing, we see that there are three equivalent resonance structures (the formal charges are shown in red):Each of these structures forces a fluorine atom to share additional electronswith the boron atom, which is inconsistent with the high electronegativity offluorine.In fact, the formal charges tell us that this is an unfavorable situation.
  33. 33. Less than an Octet of Valence Electrons A second type of exception occurs when there are fewer than eight valence electrons around an atom in a molecule or polyatomic ion. This situation is also relatively rare (with the exception of hydrogen and helium), most often encountered in compounds of boron and beryllium. As an example, let’s consider boron trifluoride, BF3. Drawing Lewis structures, we obtain the structure
  34. 34. More than an Octet of Valence Electrons The third and largest class of exceptions consists of molecules or polyatomic ions in which there are more than eight electrons in the valence shell of an atom. Lewis structure for PF5, we are forced to place ten electrons around the central phosphorus atom:• Molecules and ions with more than an octet of electrons around the central atom are often called hypervalent.• Other examples of hypervalent species are SF4, AsF6 – and ICl4- .• The corresponding molecules with a second-period atom as the central atom, such as NCl5 and OF4, do not exist.
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