Joint Information Virtual Exercise 2011

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An exercise guide for regional response agencies participating in the exercise

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Joint Information Virtual Exercise 2011

  1. 1. National Preparedness Month Tweets, Facebook Posts, and Website Text for Public Health NetworksSeptember is National Preparedness Month. As part of the month’s activities, New Hampshire and its PublicHealth Networks are exercising ways to communicate with the public. Social media and other onlineresources, like organization websites, are increasingly important sources of preparedness and emergencyinformation for NH residents. Practicing using these communication channels is an important step towardsbeing ready to use them in an emergency situation.The following document provides weekly recommendations of messages the State, Public Health Networks,partners, and local community groups and members can share with their audience(s) throughout the month.We are asking that all participating partners post at least one message to each of the media channels availableto them (Facebook, Twitter, website). You are welcome to use the recommendations in this document ordevelop your own.Themes: Each week of preparedness has a unique theme, as detailed below. All messaging for each week isrelated to the theme of the week. This way Facebook posts, tweets, and website content can be related andinterconnected. Week Dates Theme 1 9/1-3 General Preparedness 2 9/4-10 Stay 3 9/11-17 Leave 4 9/18-24 Connect 5 9/25-30 VolunteerLinks: You may notice that special URLs are included in almost all of the messages. These URLs are designed tocollect data on how many people click on it. Each week has its own special URL that will link readers to a pageon the Ready NH website. It is important that you keep these links, as is, in your messages.Hashtags: Additionally, the tweets include hashtags (# NPM, #ReadyNH), or tags that allow the public, and us,to search for your message. #NPM is the hashtag that FEMA is promoting for National Preparedness Month.#ReadyNH will be the hashtag that we will be using to monitor Twitter activity in NH around NPM. Pleaseinclude #ReadyNH on all tweets, and #NPM if you have the space.Guidance on how to use Facebook & Twitter to post messages, links, and question polls are included at theend of this document.If you have additional questions, please contact Community Health Institute staff:Alyson Cobb, 573-3319, acobb@jsi.comArielle Slam, 573-3341, aslam@jsi.com (n/a 9/3-9/11) 1
  2. 2. National Preparedness Month- JIVE 2011 W EEK 1 (Please note that tweets may be appropriately adapted for Facebook status updates if you desire additional messages to provide this week.)September is National Preparedness Month, the perfect time for you & your family to prepare! Learn how athttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH #NPM #ReadyNHFor National Preparedness Month, think of neighbors who may need help in a disaster. Learn how to help athttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH #NPM #ReadyNHTalk to your loved ones this month & encourage them to prepare for emergencies. Learn more athttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH #NPM #ReadyNHBusiness: Emergencies don’t wait until after hours. Do you know the emergency plan for your workplace?http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Business #NPM #ReadyNHBusiness: Emergencies don’t wait until after hours. Do you have an emergency plan for your workplace?http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Business #NPM #ReadyNHBusiness: After a disaster, 40% of businesses don’t reopen and 25% more close within 2 years. Planning can help.http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Business #NPM #ReadyNHLINK (http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH): This is National Preparedness Month, the perfect time for you and your family tomake an emergency plan, create a kit, and stay informed! Visit ReadyNH for more information.LINK (http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH): For National Preparedness Month, think of those who might need additional help inan emergency and make a plan to help them out. Visit ReadyNH for more information.VIDEO (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6T480qwMs0): Check out this great video to learn the basics of preparingfor an emergency. Then visit Ready NH to learn more. http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNHQUESTION: How prepared do you feel for an emergency? • Extremely prepared • Well prepared • Sort of prepared • Haven’t startedBusiness: Emergencies don’t wait until after hours. Do you know the emergency plan for your workplace? Learn more athttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_BusinessBusiness: Emergencies don’t wait until after hours. Do you have an emergency plan for your workplace? Learn more athttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_BusinessBusiness: After a disaster, 40% of businesses don’t reopen and 25% more close within 2 years. Planning can help. Learnmore at http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Business. 2
  3. 3. National Preparedness Month- JIVE 2011 W EEK 1 PHN and Partners’ WebsitesThis September will mark the ten year anniversary of the September 11th attacks and we ask you to take time toremember those lost as well as time to make sure you are prepared for future emergencies. National PreparednessMonth has been held each September since 2004 to increase preparedness in the U.S. It is a time to prepare yourselfand those in your care for an unexpected emergency.This September, please prepare and plan for emergencies of all types that may cause you to: • Have to stay in your home for three days without access to electricity, water, stores, and other local services • Have to leave your home quickly • Have to connect with your friends and family when communications systems may be down or overloadedFor more information on how to prepare for an emergency, whether you need to stay, leave, or connect, visit ReadyNH(link to: http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH).This September will mark the ten year anniversary of 9/11 and we ask you to take time to remember those lost as wellas time to make sure you are prepared for future emergencies. National Preparedness Month has been held eachSeptember since 2004 to increase preparedness in the U.S. It is a time to prepare yourself and those in your care for anunexpected emergency.We all know that emergencies can happen unexpectedly. In the past few years, New Hampshire has experienced a widerange of disasters including floods, snow and ice storms, tornadoes, tropical storms, and pandemic influenza.This September, please prepare and plan for emergencies of all types that may cause you to: • Have to stay in your home for three days without access to electricity, water services, access to stores, and other local services • Have to evacuate your home quickly • Have to get in touch with your friends and family when some communications systems may be down or overloaded.Learn more about what you should do to prepare for an emergency by exploring the site! 3
  4. 4. National Preparedness Month- JIVE 2011 W EEK 2 (Please note that tweets may be appropriately adapted for Facebook status updates if you desire additional messages to provide this week.)Be prepared for a disaster- keep enough supplies in your home to last for 3 days. For more info, go tohttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Stay #NPM #ReadyNHDid you know every home should have 3 gallons of water per person to be prepared? Go tohttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Stay to learn more. #NPM #ReadyNHIn an emergency, you may have to stay in your home for several days. Learn how to prepare athttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Stay #NPM #ReadyNHBusiness: What if a disaster struck during work? Prepare your office in case you need to stay there.http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Stay #NPM #ReadyNHLINK (http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Stay): During an emergency, you may have to stay in your home for several dayswithout access to electricity, water, or other services. Learn how to prepare for this situation at ReadyNH.QUESTION: Thinking back to past emergencies, what was the one thing you wished you had in your emergency kit thatyou didn’t have? • Flashlight • Radio • Batteries/Charger • Food and water • Medication • Emergency contact numbers • Blankets and extra warm clothing • Can opener • OtherBusiness: What if a disaster struck during work hours? Prepare your office in case you need to stay there until theemergency passes. http://1.usa.gov/ReadyNH_Stay 4
  5. 5. National Preparedness Month- JIVE 2011 W EEK 2 PHN and Partners’ WebsitesSeptember is National Preparedness Month. In order to be prepared for an emergency, it is important that you are ableto stay in your house for up to three days without access to electricity, water, or other services.To learn more about what you should do to prepare to stay in your home during an emergency, go to Ready NH (link to:http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Stay)In order to be prepared for an emergency, it is important that you are able to stay in your house for up to three dayswithout access to electricity, water, or other services.STAY refers to situations such as heavy storms where it is safer for people to remain in their homes than it is to gooutside. Sometimes you may just have to stay in your home for several hours or perhaps a day to give public workscrews the time to clear roads and highways. Sometimes you may need to stay in your home for three days, or evenlonger, while waiting for power to be restored.Any time power is knocked out during a storm there is the possibility that it could be out for a long time. Utilities beginrestoration work immediately, but a widespread outage could take a long time to fix, especially for people who are inisolated areas.The ice storm in December 2008 knocked out power to more than half the state and some people were without powerfor two weeks. New Hampshire residents need to be prepared for that kind of storm as well.In winter storms, people who have secondary heat sources, such as wood or gas stoves, may be able to continue to stayin their homes. Others may need to stay at local shelters.People using electric generators for their homes should have them properly installed and vented. Never operate agenerator in an enclosed area and never use an outdoor heating appliance indoors. Both will produce deadly carbonmonoxide.To learn more about what you should do to prepare to stay in your home during an emergency, review the “stay”checklist in this brochure. (link to: http://www.nh.gov/readynh/documents/readynh_stay_leave_connect.pdf) 5
  6. 6. National Preparedness Month- JIVE 2011 W EEK 3 (Please note that tweets may be appropriately adapted for Facebook status updates if you desire additional messages to provide this week.)Items often forgotten in emergency go kits: medicine, cell charger, cash. For a full go kit list-http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Leave #NPM #ReadyNHIn an emergency, you may have to leave your home quickly. Learn how to prepare for evacuation athttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Leave #NPM #ReadyNHHow quickly can you get out of your home in an emergency? Speed up with a go kit. Learn how athttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Leave #NPM #ReadyNHBusiness: Hold regular fire drills at work to make sure everyone knows the plan. For more evacuation info, go tohttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Leave #NPM #ReadyNHLINK (http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Leave): During an emergency, you may have to leave your home quickly. You canprepare for evacuation by making an emergency go kit. Learn how at ReadyNH.QUESTION: Which of these preparedness steps have you taken in case you need to quickly evacuate your home? • Reviewed how to quickly leave your home with your children • Established a meeting place in your neighborhood • Established a meeting place outside of your neighborhood • Established an out-of-state contact • Created a phone list • Taught your friends and family members with cell phones to text • Packed a go-kit with supplies you would need while away from your home • Stored important documents in a location away from your homeBusiness: When was the last time you held a fire drill at the office? Hold one during September in honor of NationalPreparedness Month to make sure everyone knows the plan. Learn more about planning for evacuation athttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Leave. 6
  7. 7. National Preparedness Month- JIVE 2011 W EEK 3 PHN and Partners’ WebsitesSeptember is National Preparedness Month. In order to be prepared for an emergency, it is important that you are ableto leave your home quickly and safely in the event of an emergency.To learn more about what you should do to prepare to evacuate in your home during an emergency, go to Ready NH.(link to: http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Leave)In order to be prepared for an emergency, it is important that you are able to leave your home quickly and safely.LEAVE refers to the need to evacuate because in an emergency it may be dangerous to stay at home. This is not an easything to do. Many people don’t want to evacuate, but when local officials say its time to leave, dont argue with them.Your life is in danger.Having a go kit will make evacuation easier. Instructions about where to go will be provided by local officials. But you willneed to bring a change of clothing, personal hygiene items, prescription medications, and toys and other supplies forinfants and young children.Remember that fire is still the most common form of emergency in any household. Make an evacuation plan with routesout of the house and a place to meet at a safe distance from the house. That way you can make sure everyone got outsafely. Many fire deaths occur because someone re-enters a burning building to search for a missing person or pet. Noone should ever go back inside a burning building.To learn more about what you should do to prepare to evacuate your home during an emergency, review the “leave”checklist in this brochure. (link to: http://www.nh.gov/readynh/documents/readynh_stay_leave_connect.pdf) 7
  8. 8. National Preparedness Month- JIVE 2011 W EEK 4 (Please note that tweets may be appropriately adapted for Facebook status updates if you desire additional messages to provide this week.)It may be easier to call long distance in a disaster. Pick an out-of-state family contact. Learn more athttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Connect #NPM #ReadyNHIn an emergency, text messages may go through more easily than cell calls. Learn more athttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Connect #NPM #ReadyNHBusiness: Can you get info to your employees in a disaster? Test your emergency notification procedure for NationalPreparedness Month. #NPM #ReadyNHLINK (http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Connect): During an emergency, you may have difficulty getting in touch with familyand friends. Cell phones may not work. Learn how to prepare for this situation at ReadyNH.QUESTION: How would you keep in touch with friends and family during an emergency? • Phone • E-mail • Visit them • Facebook • TwitterBusiness: LINK (http://www.ready.gov/business): Can you get important information out to your employees during anemergency or disaster? Test your emergency notification procedures for National Preparedness Month. To findresources to improve or develop a plan, visit ReadyBusiness. 8
  9. 9. National Preparedness Month- JIVE 2011 W EEK 4 PHN and Partners’ WebsitesSeptember is National Preparedness Month. In order to be prepared for an emergency, it is important that you are ableto get in touch with your loved ones even if phone lines are down or you are separated.To learn more about how to prepare to connect with loved ones during an emergency, go to Ready NH (link to:http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Connect)People need to stay in touch with family members during disasters. No one will feel secure until everyone is accountedfor. Families should agree ahead of time how to stay in contact. Each person should carry an emergency contact list.A good way to CONNECT during an emergency is to have someone in another state act as the family emergency contact.If family members are separated when an emergency occurs, everyone will know to call the family emergency contact ifthey cant reach each other directly. Sometimes during disasters, local phone circuits are disrupted but long distanceservice is not affected. The out-of-state contact can relay messages to family members.In an emergency, some communication tools may be working while others are not. Be ready to try different ways ofreaching each other. Sometimes you may not be able to place a cell phone call, but you may be able to send a textmessage or access the internet from your phone. Make sure you and all of your family members know how to send andreceive text messages and access the internet on their phones, if possible.Connect also means staying in touch with neighbors and members of your community. By checking on an elderly relativedown the street or volunteering with a community organization, you will be reinforcing New Englands tradition oflooking out for each other and helping to build strong communities.It is also important to pay attention to disaster warnings. The National Weather Service (NWS) provides watches andwarnings for weather-related emergencies. NWS operates a network of VHF radio stations that constantly broadcastlocal weather information. Real-time weather information is also available on the Internet and on the news. Otheremergency information is provided by the Emergency Alert System, which is carried by all broadcast stations in NewHampshire.To start making your family communication plan, use the checklist and template included in this brochure. (link to:http://www.nh.gov/readynh/documents/readynh_stay_leave_connect.pdf) 9
  10. 10. National Preparedness Month- JIVE 2011 W EEK 5 (Please note that tweets may be appropriately adapted for Facebook status updates if you desire additional messages to provide this week.)Volunteer to help your community prepare for and recover from emergencies. Go tohttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Volunteers to learn more about volunteer opportunities. #NPM #ReadyNHGo to <link> to join <name of MRC/CERT/CC> to help your community prepare for and recover from emergencies anddisasters. #NPM #ReadyNHPICTURE (Post a picture of your MRC/CERT/CC): Join <name of MRC/CERT/CC) to help your community prepare for andrecover from emergencies and disasters. For more information, . . .POST: Volunteer to help your community prepare for and recover from emergencies. Go tohttp://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Volunteers to learn more about volunteer opportunities. 10
  11. 11. National Preparedness Month- JIVE 2011 W EEK 5 PHN and Partners’ WebsitesSeptember is National Preparedness Month. A key part of New Hampshire’s emergency response is played byvolunteers. You can help your community prepare for, respond to, and recover from emergencies and disasters byjoining <name of MRC/CERT/CC group in region>.To learn more about New Hampshire’s other volunteer programs, go to ReadyNH. (link to:http://1.usa.gov/1ReadyNH_Volunteers)Volunteers are an essential part of New Hampshire’s response in any emergency. Most smaller communities in the statehave fire departments that are staffed by volunteers.Amateur radio operators, the American Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, Medical Reserve Corps units, and Citizen EmergencyResponse Teams are other examples of organizations that rely on volunteers and have important emergency responsefunctions.Planning and training are the keys to making effective use of volunteers during disasters. In order to volunteer during anemergency or disaster, join one of the NH volunteer organizations below!If you are interested in volunteering to help out during a future disaster, the time to join an organization is now! Checkout the links listed below to learn about some of New Hampshire’s volunteer programs. • American Red Cross, New Hampshire Region • American Red Cross, VT and NH Valley • NH Citizen Corps • NH Wing Civil Air Patrol • NH Emergency System for Advance Registration of Healthcare Professionals (ESAR-VHP) • Medical Reserve Corps • Amateur RadioSearch volunteer opportunities near you, with VolunteerNH’s search engine for organizations and volunteeropportunities.Volunteer New Hampshire 11
  12. 12. National Preparedness Month- JIVE 2011 M ISCELLANEOUSAdditional tweets outside of the 5 “themes” are provided below. Feel free to use this in addition to your once a weektweet from each of the 5 categories. (Please note that tweets may be appropriately adapted for Facebook status updates if you desire additional messages to provide this week.)Teach your children how and when to call 9-1-1 or your local emergency medical services number for help. #NPM#ReadyNHHave kids? Ask their school for a copy of their emergency plan for you to keep at home or work. #NPM #ReadyNHPreparedness on a budget: Pick up canned items on sale a few at a time. #NPM #ReadyNHUse #ImPrepared and share what you’ve done to get prepared for emergencies. #NPM #ReadyNHRemember your pets! Be sure to have the supplies your pets need in your emergency kit. More info at ready.gov/pets#NPM #ReadyNHKeep a small emergency kit in your car and at work so you’re prepared at all times. #NPM #ReadyNHConsider purchasing a car cell phone charger to keep your phone going during a power outage. #NPM #ReadyNHTake a minute to check your family’s first aid kit for missing items and add them to your shopping list. #NPM #ReadyNHDo you and your family know the best escape routes out of your house during a fire? More info athttp://1.usa.gov/38esdf #NPM #ReadyNHHow long has it been since you checked your smoke detector batteries? #NPM #ReadyNH 12
  13. 13. National Preparedness Month- JIVE 2011 H OW T O G UIDEHOW TO ADD A LINK ON FACEBOOKSTEP 1. Make sure you are using your business page and NOT your personal profile page. To do so, go to Account (topright hand corner) and select Use Facebook as Page.A screen will pop up. Select the business page youwant and click Switch.STEP 2. Above the status field, click on the tabthat says Link.STEP 2. You will be prompted to attach a link. Doso by pasting the URL into the link box and clickAttach.STEP 3. Once Facebook populates an image or titlefor your link, you can scroll through the thumbnailoptions to select the most appropriate image to beassociated with your link.STEP 4. Add a message to your audience aboutthe link provided. Click Share to post to your wall.ADDING A LINK IN TWITTERPosting a link in Twitter is simple.Simply paste the desired URL towhere you compose a tweet andinclude any message you wantrelated to that URL. Twitter willautomatically shorten the URL foryou to help keep you within the140 character limit for a Tweet. Since the tweets we are providing already have a shortened URL, Twitter may not makeit any shorter than it already is. 13
  14. 14. National Preparedness Month- JIVE 2011 H OW T O G UIDEHOW TO POST A QUESTION ON FACEBOOKSTEP 1. Above your status update field in Facebook,click on the Question button.STEP 2. Type in your question.STEP 3. Click on Add Poll Options. Continue to addoptions until all desired options have been listed. Youmay also add options after the question has beenposted.STEP 4. Click Ask question. Your question is now apublic question that anyone can respond to, or see theresponses to it. You can view your question bynavigating to your wall.Once you post a question, it becomes a public poll.Public users can see and share the question, as well asview the results.If one of your partners plans to post the samequestion, you may want to “Share” their question, by clicking the “Share” button below the question posted on theirwall and selecting “Share: On your page.” This way all responses from agencies that have posted this question arepooled together and you will get a larger number of responses. 14

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