A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />ARGEMIRO AMAYA BUELVAS<br ...
A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />DEFINING CONCEPTS<br />1. ...
A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Reading is...<br />“the ac...
A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Reading is...<br />“the ab...
A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />we read  for...<br />“Ther...
Reading for information (in order to find out something or in order to do something with the information you get)” Grellet...
A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Reduce the confusion while...
A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Reduce the confusion while...
SKILLS VS STRATEGIES<br />Skill<br />Strategy<br />- Observable behaviours (answers to questions, answers on tests, skills...
A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Metacognition <br />Accord...
A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Metacognition <br />Metaco...
A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Metacognition <br />Two di...
METACOGNITIVE SKILLS<br />
A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Reference Guide to Reading...
 Scanning
Topics vs Main Idea
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1st reading strategies

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1st reading strategies

  1. 1. A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />ARGEMIRO AMAYA BUELVAS<br />Especialista en ELT<br />C. Magister in Education<br />
  2. 2. A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />DEFINING CONCEPTS<br />1. What reading is.<br />2. Why we read.<br />3. Skills Vs Strategy<br />4. Metacognition <br /> – Metacognitive Process<br /> _ The Importance and dimensions of Metacognitive ability<br />5. Reference Guide to Reading Strategies<br />6. Exercise – SKIMMING<br />
  3. 3. A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Reading is...<br />“the action or skill of reading” (Concise Oxford English Dictionary, 2008, p.1196).<br />“the skill or activity of getting information from books” (Cambridge International Dictionary of English, 1995, pp. 1178-1179).<br />“reading” is the construction of meaning from print<br />(Torgensen, Wagner &Rashotte, 1999).<br />
  4. 4. A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Reading is...<br />“the ability to comprehend the thought and feelings of others through the medium of written text” (The Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, 1994).<br />Gibson and Levin (1975) assume that “reading is extracting information from text”.<br />“Understanding a written text means extracting the required information from it as efficiently as possible” Grellet (1981)<br />
  5. 5. A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />we read for...<br />“There are two main reasons for reading:<br /><ul><li>Reading for pleasure.
  6. 6. Reading for information (in order to find out something or in order to do something with the information you get)” Grellet (1981)</li></li></ul><li>A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />“Many students enter higher education underprepared for the reading demands that are placed upon them. When pressed to read, they often select ineffective and inefficient strategies with little strategic intent (cf. Saumell et al., 1999;Wade et al., 1990;Wood et al., 1998). Often this is due to their low level of reading strategy knowledge and lack of metacognitive control (Dreyer, 1998;Strydom, 1997;Van Wyk, 2001). Another reason might be their inexperience coming from the limited task demands of high school”.<br />
  7. 7. A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Reduce the confusion while offering an analysis that highlights the commonalities and distinctiveness of each term.<br />Skills are...<br />“Reading skills are automatic actions that result in decoding and comprehension with speed, efficiency, and fluency and usually occur without awareness of the components or control involved”.<br />“Reading skills operate without the reader’s deliberate control <br />or conscious awareness”. <br />
  8. 8. A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Reduce the confusion while offering an analysis that highlights the commonalities and distinctiveness of each term.<br />Strategies are...<br />“Reading strategies are deliberate, goal-directed attempts to control and modify the reader’s efforts to decode text, understand words, and construct meanings of text”.<br />“Strategies are conscious, controllable processes used to self-regulate reading for the purpose of attaining a specific cognitive goal (e.g., see Alexander et al., 1998; Pressley, 2000; Trabasso & Bouchard, 2002).<br />”. <br />
  9. 9. SKILLS VS STRATEGIES<br />Skill<br />Strategy<br />- Observable behaviours (answers to questions, answers on tests, skills list, and taxonomies).<br />- A conscious plan under the control of the reader.<br />- Product- oriented. <br />- Generally thought to be unobservable.<br />- Process-oriented.<br />- Instructions focus on ways to help students understand what they read.<br />
  10. 10. A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Metacognition <br />According to O'Malley, et al., "students without metacognitive approaches are essentially learners without direction or opportunity to review their progress, accomplishments, and future directions" (1985, p. 561).<br />
  11. 11. A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Metacognition <br />Metacognition is "cognition about cognition," or "thinking about thinking.”<br />“an awareness of what skills, strategies, and resources are needed to perform a task effectively; and the ability to use self-regulatory mechanisms to ensure successful completion of a task” (p. 345) . <br />Metacognitive instruction about how and why to use strategies can be quite effective (NICHD, 2000).<br />
  12. 12. A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Metacognition <br />Two dimensions: <br />(1) knowledge of cognition <br />(2) regulation of cognition (Flavell, 1978). <br />The first aspect of metacognition, "knowledge about cognition," includes three components <br />"declarative," "procedural," and "conditional" (Paris, Lipson, and Wixson, 1983).<br />.<br />
  13. 13. METACOGNITIVE SKILLS<br />
  14. 14. A MODELING OF READING STRATEGIES INTO THE READING PROCESS FROM A METACOGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE<br />Reference Guide to Reading Strategies<br /><ul><li>Skimming
  15. 15. Scanning
  16. 16. Topics vs Main Idea
  17. 17. Finding Details
  18. 18. Finding The Main Idea
  19. 19. Inferencing
  20. 20. Supporting Main ideas
  21. 21. Patterns of Organization
  22. 22. Understanding Facts and Opinions
  23. 23. Drawing Conclusions.</li></li></ul><li>Reading: THE TOLL HOUSE INN: SITE OF AN AMERICAN INVENTION<br />Reading Strategy: SKIMMING<br />
  24. 24. THANK YOU. I DO APPRECIATE YOUR INTEREST.<br />
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