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Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5
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Baseline documentation foothills land trust 5 of 5

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  1. Baseline Documentation Report and MonitoringTemplates: Recommendations for FLTJune 2010Prepared by Tracy Lee and Kim Good Prepared for:
  2. Baseline Documentation Report and Monitoring Templates:Recommendations to FLTJune 2010Prepared by Tracy Lee and Kim GoodMiistakis Institutec/o EVDS – University of Calgary2500 University Drive NWCalgary, ABT2N 1N4Phone: (403) 220-8968Email: institute@rockies.caWeb: www.rockies.ca
  3. TABLE OF CONTENTSIntroduction ..................................................................................................................................................................... 1Baseline Documentation Report (BDR) ...................................................................................................................... 1 Who should prepare the BDR?................................................................................................................................ 2 Components of a BDR ............................................................................................................................................... 2Monitoring Reports ........................................................................................................................................................ 2 Frequency of Monitoring .......................................................................................................................................... 2 Who should prepare monitoring reports? ............................................................................................................. 3 Components of a monitoring report........................................................................................................................ 3 Development of a Volunteer Monitoring Program............................................................................................... 3Recommendations.......................................................................................................................................................... 4 Appendix 1: FLT Baseline Documentation Report template............................................................................... 5 Appendix 2: FLT Monitoring Template ................................................................................................................. 11FLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations i
  4. INTRODUCTIONThe purpose of this report is to recommend procedures and templates for FLT Baseline DocumentationReports and Monitoring Reports. The Baseline Documentation Report and Monitoring Report areimportant components of a land trust’s stewardship, enforcement and legal defense platform.A Baseline Documentation Report (BDR) is a record of the current condition of the property as agreed toby the land trust and landowner at the signing of the conservation easement (CE). It therefore representsa legal document that must hold up in court. In addition, it is used as the basis for monitoring the propertyand for developing management plans to help uphold the conservation value of the easement.Developing standard operating procedures around the BDR is beneficial for land trust-landownerrelations, as well as reducing the risk of violations and enforcement on the conservation property.Monitoring reports enable the land trust to document changes and/or threats to the conservation valueof the property overtime. Monitoring frequently is important for building and maintaining landownerrelations, detecting and addressing early violations and establishing a record of due diligence for theland trust should the CE be challenged in court. Establishing procedures and templates for monitoring isan important component of a land trust’s legal defense.A number of manuals/modules dedicated to baseline documentation reporting and monitoring werereviewed to develop a set of recommendations for FLT. Some of the documents included: 1. Doscher, P., B. Lind, E. Sturgis and C. West. 2007. Determining Stewardship Costs and Raising and managing Dedicated Funds. The Land Trust Alliance. 2. Heidenreich, B. Draft 2009. A Stewardship, Monitoring and Costing Guide for Natural Heritage Conservation Agreements. Ontario Heritage Trust and Ontario Land Trust Alliance. 3. Michalsky, S. 2010. Baseline Documentation Report Training Module. Alberta Land Trust Alliance. 4. Michalsky, S. 2010. Stewardship Monitoring Training Module. Alberta Land Trust Alliance. DOCUMENTATIONBASELINE DOCUMENTATION REPORT (BDR)The baseline documentation report (BDR) provides a snap shot of the biophysical condition of a propertysubject to a conservation easement and represents an agreement between the land trust and landowner.It serves as a basis for monitoring compliance and to inform the enforcement process and/or defense ofthe CE in court. The BDR states the purpose of the conservation easement and documents theconservation value of the property, current land uses, biophysical conditions and potential threats at thetime of securement.FLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 1
  5. Who should prepare the BDR?A BDR is a legal document and it is therefore advisable that a qualified professional (or individual withyears of experience) prepare the BDR. It is advisable that FLT keep on file resumes of individuals involvedin preparation of BDR.In addition, it is advisable to include the landowner in the BDR process to help inform components of theBDR and to help establish a positive relationship with the landowner.Components of a BDRThere are specific components that a land trust should include in a BDR. These are listed below; • Location and legal description of property • Clear description of the purpose of the CE or intent of the conservation easement from the landowner and land trusts perspective. • Existing anthropogenic features on the landscape • Land use activities • Hydrological features, vegetation communities, soils and wildlife occurring/using the properties as well as possible threats to these features. • Monitoring recommendations • Signature pageAn annotated FLT BDR template is attached in Appendix 1.MONITORING REPORTSThe purpose of the monitoring report is to determine compliance of clauses in the ConservationEasement (CE) and to ensure that the intent and objectives of the CE are being upheld. The monitoringreport enables the land trust to track the condition of the property over time through comparison with thebaseline documentation report (BDR). It also provides an opportunity for FLT and the landowner to buildon their positive relationship and to review the CE during the monitoring exercise.Frequency of MonitoringThe frequency of monitoring varies between land trusts, but ideally, each property will be visitedannually. If costs are a concern to the land trust, every second year may be acceptable as long as longas there is contact with the land owner in between monitoring years. If monitoring is not handled on anannual basis, undertaking a landowner risk assessment may help a land trust prioritize properties formore frequent monitoring. FLT will develop guidelines as to how often they will monitor a property.A land trust usually monitors during the growing season. However there may be cases where monitoringshould occur during different seasons depending on restrictions in the CE or threats the land trust isconcerned with.FLT will develop guidelines on the timing and frequency of monitoring of properties.FLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 2
  6. Who should prepare monitoring reports?Ideally a monitoring report is carried out by a qualified professional capable of building a trustingrelationship with the landowner. However, small land trusts often depend on volunteer monitors.Therefore, guidelines are required regarding: o A volunteer based monitoring program (see below). o Maintaining a list of volunteers with experience at monitoring. o Pairing less experienced volunteers with more experienced volunteers. o Implementing a policy and / or guidelines on the role of the volunteer to clearly define: • Expectations on communicating with landowners (e.g. do not offer management advice instead bring questions back to the land trust). • Procedure in the case of a potential violation (e.g. who communicates with landowner and how). • Reporting and follow-up procedures.Components of a monitoring reportSpecific components that a land trust should include in a monitoring report include: • Date of inspection • Review of BDR, management plans and past monitoring reports • Address each restriction listed in the CE and monitor for compliance • Recognize and detail violations • Communicate / build positive relationships with the landowner. • Document changes (natural or man-made) to the condition of the property that impact the CEAn annotated FLT Monitoring template is attached in Appendix 2.Development of a Volunteer Monitoring ProgramFLT is a small land trust that currently utilizes volunteers to complete baseline and monitoring reports. Asthe number of conservation easement properties held by FLT increases, there may be a need to increasethe number of dedicated individuals available to monitor properties. FLT should consider developing avolunteer based monitoring program, where the access to qualified dedicated professionals able toassist in monitoring conservation easement properties in increased.The components of the volunteer based monitoring program include: o Clearly define the goals of a volunteer monitoring program (e.g. education, community support, cost effective) o Engage volunteers (e.g. describe how volunteers will be informed of the program and engaged) o Coordinate volunteers o Volunteer insurance (e.g. how are they covered?) o Train volunteers (e.g. workshops, apprentice program, training manuals, workshops) • Expectations and responsibilities of volunteer • Safety concerns • Template reviewFLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 3
  7. Equipment Protocols • Field visit instructions • Communications with landowner • Address violations (their role and responsibility) • Reporting and follow-up o Retain volunteers (e.g. incentive, reward, recognition program) o Evaluate program (e.g. frequency or review, methodology) o tie into the programs goals to measure success o define success o Pilot program – initiate a small scale program (e.g. start with small group of volunteers that have been targeted by the FLT board as good volunteer candidates) to enable FLT to adapt and strengthen the program based on results of pilot program.RECOMMENDATIONS • Review, edit and accept as a standard operating procedure the new FLT BDR template. • Review, edit and accept as a standard operating procedure the new FLT monitoring template. • Develop guidelines around: o the frequency and timing of monitoring; o qualifications of individuals undertaking FLT BDR or monitoring reports; and o response to violations. • Ensure FLT has resume on file of BDR and monitoring volunteers. • Develop an FLT volunteer monitoring program to help build up a pool of volunteers to assist in monitoring.FLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 4
  8. Appendix 1: FLT Baseline Documentation Report template Foothills Land Trust CE Baseline Annotated TemplateThe baseline documentation report (BDR) provides a snap shot of the biophysical condition of a property subject toa conservation easement and represents an agreement between the Land Trust and landowner. It serves as abasis for monitoring compliance and to inform the enforcement process and/or defense of the CE in court. TheBDR states the purpose of the conservation easement and documents the conservation value of the property,current land uses, biophysical conditions and potential threats at the time of securement.1.0 BACKGROUNDThe background section of the BDR provides general information on the property, landowner and individualpreparing the baseline, as well as a legal description of property and reference to the CE.The majority of landowners are knowledgeable about their land and buildings. Maintaining strong land ownerrelations is a priority stewardship goal for any land trust. Thus it is advisable to involve the landowner in the BDR.This can be done by having the landowner participate in the field visit and/or through an interview process (Seesuggested questions in Appendix 2). 1.1. Property Name • Name of CE property (used to refer to easement by FLT) 1.2. Property Contact • Owner name • Contact Person (if different from above) • Contact information including phone number, fax number, email and mailing address 1.3. Baseline Prepared by The BDR is a component of legal defense. FLT should keep on file the resume of the volunteer or contractor who prepared the BDR. The BDR should include a brief statement of the qualifications of the volunteer/contractor who prepared the BDR such as relevant training, professional designation, and years of experience. • Name of individual completing baseline • Date(s) of field visit • Contact information including phone number, email and mailing address • Statement of qualifications/expertise 1.4. Legal Description Refer to land titles for legal description, but also provide details for areas (zones) that are exempt from CE clauses and/or where permissions need to be granted from the land trust. • Legal Description (ATS) (LLD or LSD. • Area of CE (acres, hectares) • Area (acres, hectares, m3) of take-out parcels • Area descriptions (location using local landmarks, GPS waypoints (nad83).FLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 5
  9. • Relevant title encumbrances (refer to land title) Appendix 1 Copy of the Land title(s) after CE is registered Appendix 2: Potential questions to ask landowner/land manager to inform baseline report 1.5. Conservation Easement Reference Statement Refer back to the CE (may include the date CE was signed) and provide a brief history of donation of CE, indicate if CE is donation, split receipt, paid and/or an Ecological Gift under Environment Canada’s Ecological Gift Program. • Provide a reference to the conservation easement agreement, • Date it was signed, • Description of donation/acquisition of property. 1.6 Partnership Approach • Describe the link between the FLT mission statement and the land owner’s interest in placing a CE on the property. • Attach the Letter of Intent from the landowner2.0 PURPOSE OF CEThe purpose of the CE states the intent of the conservation easement and the common purpose of the CE from thelandowner and land trust perspectives. In this section, regional and local conservation values that the CE protectsare highlighted. There is debate around focusing the purpose on regional or local conservation values, because ofinstances whereby documentation is considered either too vague or too specific in describing the purpose. Clarityis important when describing the conservation value and a land trust needs to consider landscapes as dynamicentities and that a CE is for perpetuity. For example, describing the purpose of a CE in protecting habitat for anendangered species could be problematic in court if the species becomes extirpated from the region. In addition,the language linking the CE and BDR must be consistent.The reader of the BDR should understand the reason the landowners and land trust have entered into a CE. Forexample, is there a common purpose or shared conservation values? Attaching a letter of intent from thelandowner and referring to the FLT mission statement, if appropriate, will help readers to understand the intent ofthe CE. Context 2.1 Regional Context A regional context will be provided by highlighting the general conservation values (e.g. species at risk, ecological systems/landscapes of interest, Ecologically Significant Areas) of the property in relation to the MD of Foothills and lands adjacent and/or nearby the CE (e.g. other government or privately protected lands). 2.2 Local Context Context Highlight specific natural features of the landscape, including any specific sensitive ecosystem types or features found on the property. Insert Map 1 – Surrounding context - include roads, rivers and streams, protected areas, other parcels of interest (as detailed in regional context)FLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 6
  10. 3.0 Anthropogenic Features and Land Use ActivitiesA BDR documents the current condition of the land at the time of signing. To monitor for compliance, allanthropogenic features occurring on the CE property will be documented. This section will be tied into the CErestrictions and will include a list of features to be grandfathered into the CE. If a planned feature does not yetexist on the property, it should be stated as such in the BDR. All features will be mapped and photographed toprovide clarity to the baseline and the purpose of the structures will be explained. Existing 3.1 Existing Anthropogenic features (Grandfathered into CE) • Provide a written description (include purpose of feature), map (UTM (using GPS unit) and photograph (include UTM (using GPS unit) of photo, direction of photo (using compass directions) and photo description) all existing human made features on the landscape. • Some features to consider based on FLT restrictions; o All building structures and associated infrastructure o Fences (record height and number of wire strands) o Roads and Trails o Soil disturbance (cleared areas) o Mining (sand, rock, gravel piles) o Existing oil and gas infrastructure o Garbage, waste or debris sites o Water systems (irrigation, troughs, wells, dugouts) o Wildlife traps o Areas where chemicals ( pesticides, fertilizers and herbicides) have been applied o May need to consider other features as well depending on specifics of the CE and the property Map 2 – Anthropogenic Features- location within CE of features described above 3.2 Land Use Activity To enable the land trust to assess the level of risk on a property, the BDR will describe the historic and current land uses on the property and on neighboring parcels. For example, are there any areas on or near the property that may be zoned for conflicting activities that might put the conservation values of the property at risk? Does the landowner have existing management plans in place to guide land management (e.g. forestry, grazing)? All current management plans being used by the landowner will be documented. The BDR can inform and guide the development of any future management plans for the property. • Describe historical (if relevant) and current land use activities for the CE and specified areas if applicable. • Current zoning. • Refer to existing management plans. • Highlight land use activities on surrounding parcels. Appendix 3 Existing Management Plans for Property Appendix 4: Photo table of locations, map and photos4.0 Natural FeaturesAll water features should be identified by type (river, stream, pond, lake, and wetland), mapped and photographed.Note if the water features are ephemeral or year round, direction of flow, and activities up stream that may impacthealth.FLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 7
  11. CE clauses that refer to the health or condition of water features may be difficult to measure. The land trust needsto develop protocols for how it will determine if this clause is in compliance. 4.1 Hydrological Features • Provide a written description, map (UTM (using GPS unit) and photograph (UTM (using GPS unit), direction of photo (using compass) and photo description) all existing water features on the CE. • Water features may include: o Rivers, streams o Water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) o Springs 4.2 Water Quality • Note activities occurring on the CE that may impact water health? o Wildlife / stock watering o Trails / roads through water systems o proximity to an agricultural field o Recreational use o Chemical usage o Wildlife presence / absence • Water sampling approaches o Water samples will be taken where a stream enters and exits the property to generate a baseline of water quality. Future monitoring of the effect of activities will refer to the baseline. Map 4 – Water Features- location within CE of features described above 4.2 Vegetation Vegetation communities should be documented on map, with photos and described in the BDR. In addition, threats to the native vegetation should be documented (e.g. invasive species). • Provide a written description (include dominant species, rare and unusual flora, human – made habitat), map (UTM (using GPS unit) and photograph (UTM (using GPS unit), direction of photo (using compass) and photo description) all vegetation communities including natural and human-made on the CE. • Common types of vegetation communities include native grassland, wetland, riparian, croplands, tame forage, aspen and spruce forest. (May be able to use remote sensing or Alberta Vegetation Index or Alberta Plant Community Guides as a starting point). • Document threats to native vegetation communities. • Describe and list invasive species occurring on the CE (document larger patches on map, using UTM (GPS Unit). Map 5 – Vegetation Communities - location within CE of features described above 4.3 Surficial Bedrock Geology and Soils • Identify surface and underlying geology • Use AGRSID to determine soil seriesFLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 8
  12. Map 6 – Soil Series Wildlife4.3 WildlifeIn this section of the BDR describe important wildlife habitat (e.g. ungulate winter range, grizzly bear movementcorridor), species of interest or any other ecological values. Include in this section rare, endangered species(including rank) that may occur on the property. This section may reply heavily on landowner knowledge, localexpert knowledge (local fish and wildlife officers, biologists) or research reports. • List specific habitat occurring on the property for terrestrial or aquatic species and/or species groups of interest • List any important migrating species that use the property as permanent or seasonal habitat or for movement opportunities for specific groups and or species? • Reference other research/reports that document the importance of this area for species groups and/or species. • List any rare or endangered species occurring on the property. Specify rank and if recovery plan is in place.Appendix 3: Photo table of locations, map and photos5.0 Monitoring RecommendationsA BDR should include a series of recommendations about how to monitor the property and to help inform themanagement plans developed by FLT. • List any recommendations for future monitoring (e.g. invasive species of concern, addressing threats outlined in the BDR). • Time of year for monitoring to occur. • How often monitoring should occur • Frequency of using certain types of field methodologies if appropriate to CE clauses or existing management plan (e.g. range health, riparian health) Condition6.0 Owner Acknowledgement of Condition • Include a section for signatures, where FLT and landowners agree to the BDR as accurately representing the current condition of the property. • Date of completion. Appendix 1: Land Title Appendix 2: Landowner Interview –suggested questions to inform BDR a. Length of time as owner of property b. Existing land uses of property (also historical if different) e.g. agriculture, ranching, recreation and forestry) c. Current management regime (Are there any management plans?). d. Are there areas/topics you feel you would like to know more about? e. Discuss anthropogenic features on the landscape and purpose of features. f. Discuss water features on the landscape – location of features g. Do you have invasive species on the property (list species if possible) and discuss location of patches. As well as history (eg. pathways of invasion)FLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 9
  13. h. Are you aware of any water quality assessments on this property? Are you interested in learning more about water health issues? i. Are there areas where chemical pesticides or fertilizers have been used on the property? If yes, please explain why? j. Please list species you have seen on the property and frequency of sightings? k. Are there things you are concerned about from a stewardship perspective that FLT might be able to assist you with? Appendix 3: Photo Location table, map and photos (with description)Photo # UTM East UTM West Date Map 7 – Photograph locationsDisclaimerThis Baseline Documentation Report Template was created for the Foothills Land Trust and may or maynot be appropriate for all land trust organizations. It is available for any land trust to use and to adapt forits own purposes. Foothills Land Trust is not responsible for any results achieved or decisions madethrough the use of the Baseline Documentation Report Template.FLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 10
  14. Appendix 2: FLT Monitoring Template Foothills Land Trust Conservation Easement Monitoring Annotated TemplateThe purpose of the monitoring report is to determine compliance of clauses in the Conservation Easement (CE) andto ensure that the intent and objectives of the CE are being upheld. The monitoring report enables the land trust totrack condition of the property over time through comparison with the baseline documentation report (BDR). It alsoprovides an opportunity for FLT and the landowner to build on their positive relationship and to review the CEduring the monitoring exercise.The frequency of monitoring varies between land trusts, but ideally each property will be visited annually. If costsare a concern to a land trust, every second year may be acceptable as long as the land trust has contact with theland owner in between monitoring years. If monitoring is not handled on an annual basis, undertaking alandowner risk assessment may help a land trust prioritize properties for more intensive monitoring.1.0 INTRODUCTIONThe introduction section of the monitoring report provides general information on the property, landowner andindividual preparing the monitoring report. 1.6. Property Name • Name of CE property (refer to easement ) • Date CE was signed 1.7. Property Contact • Owner name • Contact Person (if different from above) • Contact info: phone number, email and mailing contact 1.8. Monitoring Conducted by: • Name of individual completing baseline • Dates of site visits • Contact info: phone number, email and mailing contact • Sign declaration from the monitor that the information collected is confidential.***I understand that the knowledge I gain and the information I collect is confidential and belongs to the FoothillsLand Trust and should only be discussed with members of the Foothills Land Trust Board.FLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 11
  15. 2.0 Past Issues and ConcernsThere is a certain amount of preparatory work involved before the site visit. The monitor will review the BDR,management report/plans and past monitoring reports (including all associated photos and maps) to becomefamiliar with the property and past concerns or issues documented on previous site visits. 2.1 List past identified concerns/ areas where attention is suggested • Review baseline report and past monitoring reports to identify issues/concerns • List the issues/concerns and comment on current situation (Has the issue being addressed? How has it been addressed). • If there are no past concerns state in monitoring report. Visit3.0 Site VisitThe site visit is an opportunity for the land trust to build on or maintain its relationship with the landowner, eitherby inviting them to join the site visit and/or by undertaking a landowner interview. The monitor will review eachpermission and restriction (table form in the CE; see below) and document the method used to assess thepermission/restriction and what has changed since the BDR was completed. For example, if the land owner ispermitted to post signage, the measure would be presence/absence; if the landowner has recently placed a sign,indicate “yes” there are changes from the BDR; describe and take a photo to highlight the change. If a restrictionoccurs that is in violation of the CE, a detailed description will be provided below the table.All changes, natural and man-made will be documented even if they do not impact the intent of the CE. 3.1 Landowner Relations • Was the landowner present during the site visit (Yes/No) • Interview the landowner (suggested questionnaire Appendix A) • Identify how long the current owner has owned/lived on the property? 3.2 Monitoring Restrictions Table • Adjust monitoring restrictions table (Table 1) in the site visit section to match list of restrictions in CE. • Measur: Method used to assess restriction (visual observation on site visit, landowner report, document (report, land title), air photo, sample collected and analyzed. • Visual observation of changes since BDR (presence/absence should include a photo)FLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 12
  16. Table 1: land Owner Rights and Permitted Uses Changes from baseline/last Owners Rights and Permitted monitoring Uses Measur report (Y/N) Describe Photo 5.1 Signs The Owners have the right to post signs. Presence/absence 5.2 Access The Owners can control and restrict access. Landowner interview 5.3 Disposition The Owners have the right to sell, lease, or otherwise convey the land and to mortgage or charge the Owner’s interest in the land. Landowner interview 5.4 Maintenance The Owners can maintain, repair, enhance and replace and existing buildings, Landowner structures, and improvements interview, or access roads observational 5.5 Permitted Construction Landowner The Owners have the right to Interview, build as described in the CE. observational 5.6 Vehicles The Owner has the right to use ATVs and snowmobiles Landowner on designated trails and Interview, fence lines. observational 5.7 Agricultural Activities Landowner The owners can graze or hay interview, the property. observationalFLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 13
  17. Table 2: Restrictions on CE Violation Restrictions Measur (Y/N) Describe Photo 6.1 Destruction of Vegetation Observational No cutting, removal, or evidence of changes destruction of vegetation. to vegetation communities 6.2 Drainage and Diversion of Observational Water Courses evidence of changes No alteration, diversion or to water courses (ie. drainage of water courses. no structural barriers evident) 6.3 Pollution of Water Question in land Courses owner interview and No pollution or degradation of water sample for water courses or water streams at entry and bodies on the property. exit point 6.4 Shoreline Vegetation No destruction of vegetation Observational no or soils on shorelines of evidence of erosion or water courses or water vegetation removal bodies. along shore lines 6.5 Wildlife Disturbance No noise, glare, obstruction or odour which may be reasonably anticipated to disturb wildlife patterns. Observational 6.6 Wildlife Movement No activity which will impede wildlife movement. Observational 6.7 Chemicals and Fertilizers No pesticides including Land owner herbicides, or fertilizers. interviews 6.8 Mining No excavation, dredging, or mining of any sand, gravel, minerals, rock or other materials. Observational 6.9 Resource Extraction No oil and gas exploration unless required by law Presence/absence 6.10 Refuse No dumping of garbage, waste, debris, or refuse Presence/absence 6.11 Hunting and Trapping No hunting, killing, trapping of Observational no animals or birds on the evidence of traps or property. kills 6.12 Construction No building except as allowed by the management plan in the CE. Presence/absence 6.13 Subdivision No application for subdivision. Presence/absenceFLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 14
  18. Changes will be documented using location (GPS waypoints; nad83), photos and specifics on the violation(describe severity and scope) and if it has an impact on the intent of the CE. Where appropriate suggest possibleactions or resolutions. Observations 3.3 Wildlife Observations during site visit or by landowner • List species (flora and fauna) observed by the monitor or landowner since the previous visit. 3.4 Water • Were there any water quality studies/research done on the site • Note the location of water samples • Results of any water quality samples taken 3.5 Document significant changes observed on the property • Natural changes (e.g. water course change due to flooding, fire) • Land use changes • Document changes/violations by using maps, photos (GPS waypoints) and attach in Appendix B.4.0 Agreement Monitoring Report • Sign off by land trust board member and landowner with date of completion. A:Appendix A: landowner InterviewTo help inform information in the monitoring report, suggest interviewing the landowners. l. Length of time as owner of property m. Are the land use activities the same on the property as reported in the Baseline Document Report? n. Changes in management regime (are there any new management plans). o. Are there any significant changes to the landscape as a result of natural causes? (ie fire, flooding) p. Are there any significant changes to the landscape caused by humans? (neighbors, third party) q. Do you have invasive species on the property (list species if possible) and discuss location of patches. r. Are you aware of any water quality assessments on this property? s. Are you aware of areas where chemical pesticides or fertilizers have been used on the property? t. Please list species you have seen on the property and frequency of sightings in the last year? u. Are there things you are concerned about from a stewardship perspective that FLT might be able to assist you with?FLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 15
  19. B:Appendix B: Documented changes since BDR and/or last monitoring period.If the monitor finds evidence of a violation or change of condition since the BDR or monitoring report, it isimportant to document the change using GPS (maps), photos and detailed descriptions. Describe theextent and severity of the impact. There is no need for a conversation with the land owner at this time, anFLT board member will follow up with the land owner once the potential violation has been reviewedinternally.DisclaimerThis Monitoring Report Template was created for the Foothills Land Trust and may or may not beappropriate for all land trust organizations. It is available for any land trust to use and to adapt for its ownpurposes. Foothills Land Trust is not responsible for any results achieved or decisions made through theuse of the Monitoring Report Template.FLT BDR and Monitoring Recommendations 16

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