The 10th floor of 2 Nationwide Plaza and the entrance to WCOL (Now, after Clearchannel bought Nationwide Communications an...
The lobby of WCOL<br />
The studios and engineering are down the hallway<br />
In the garage under Nationwide Plaza, the WCOL van and the WNCI van are housed. The WCOL van is getting a refit with new e...
Here is the before shot. Everything has been removed except for the Caterpillar battery and mast. The battery is used to p...
The old rack is sitting in the shop and we are stripping the equipment from it.<br />
The WCOL engineering shop. The back wall is full of patch panels for the studios.<br />
This workstation is my little corner of the station.<br />
The van after Kevin, my boss finished carpeting it.<br />
Phase 1: moving the old equipment to the new rack and adding some of the new gear at the top.<br />
Wiring it all up.<br />
The rack is reinstalled in the side cargo door of the van for easy access.<br />
My new components replace the old equipment.<br />
A radio, wireless mic, feedback filter, audio mixer, and a jack panel that I built. My power control panel below that alon...
The remote broadcast transmitter, blank panels and a storage drawer for cables, mics, etc.<br />
In the van, promotions gear including the table, prize wheel, and a 2-wheeler.<br />
The van at a promotional appearance<br />
The antenna is not on the mast yet.<br />
Getting their boots shined courtesy of the station<br />
The AM transmitter site and backup FM site<br />
The gray storage shed, the block fallout shelter, and at the back the transmitter building. WCOL was once a civil defense ...
The transmitters: 1000W AM on the left in black, backup AM next to it. On the right of the doorway, the backup FM and a ra...
In the middle of the room, more audio equipment in 3 racks. Power panels on the back wall.<br />
In the bomb shelter, an antique audio board from the 60s<br />
Dixie and Skip making an appearance at Jeffersonville Outlet Mall<br />
Posing with the winners<br />
At Channel 10's transmitter building, the main transmitter for WCOL in black. The copper pipe at the top is actually the a...
A closer look at the transmitter. Because of the cooling fan, it looks and sounds more like a furnace than a transmitter<b...
Supporting equipment includes redundant Studio Transmitter Links (dark grey boxes) and audio processing and filtering equi...
Inside the STL. This box gets the signal sent from the studio downtown and feeds it to the transmitter.<br />
Channel 10's tower has 9 radio stations and 3 TV stations on it. These "pipes" are waveguides that combine the signals and...
More of the combiner<br />
This is the gangway at the bottom of the tower. It has a 3 person elevator going up the middle of the tower. Notice the st...
Looking up at the top of the tower.<br />
Photo from a staff party.<br />
WRFD radio and WCOL struck a deal where they moved into our site and rented space. This is the beginning of installing the...
Here's the other part of their transmitter.<br />
working on the install<br />
Unloading the rest of it.<br />
The transmitter assembled in place.<br />
The inside of the beast.<br />
That brown thing at the bottom is the power transformer! It is wired with car jumper cable sized wring.<br />
Back at the studio, we installed the Emergency Alert System boxes. The government replaced the old Emergency Broadcast Sys...
Here are the two boxes, one with printer paper coming out of the front.<br />
A typical studio<br />
An appearance with Alabama<br />
Everyone wanted pictures with the band<br />
Dixie and John-Boy Crenshaw<br />
The Van that I rebuilt<br />
The crowd coming to see Alabama<br />
Putting in the new AudioVAULT automation system. Two servers in the left hand rack (WCOLA & WCOLB) will hold our music and...
Note the nice clean wiring in the racks<br />
The same studio from before with the computer on the "dentist arm" as Skip would call it.<br />
A magazine was doing a story on our new system, I was asked to stand in for a lighting test for the photographer.<br />
Remote broadcast from Polaris<br />
The Van, mast up and on the air.<br />
More work at the backup site. These are the waveguides running to the tower.<br />
The base of the tower. The tower has a charge of 12,000 volts and you are not allowed within 20 feet when it is on the air...
Electrical work for WRFD<br />
Refitting to old bomb shelter to become a backup studio after we were forced to evacuate Nationwide Plaza because of a bom...
We mounted a dehumidifier to the wall so we could drain it through a tube in the bomb shelter wall that was meant to be us...
Replacing that antique audio board with current technology. The old board went to a museum.<br />
Electrical is done for WRFD<br />
Installing two VHS HiFI VCRs with two 6 hour tapes of emergency programming for each station (the FM and the AM).<br />
The WRFD transmitter completed<br />
A dial in audio interface that I built at the station.<br />
A program switch box that I built used for taking control of the stations from the transmitter site.<br />
A peek inside at the wiring<br />
A remote control for the same box<br />
An upgraded version of the remote van controls.<br />
The wiring in the power control box<br />
A closer look.<br />
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Greg Ardrey at WCOL radio, 1996 1997

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Greg Ardrey at WCOL radio, 1996 1997

  1. 1. The 10th floor of 2 Nationwide Plaza and the entrance to WCOL (Now, after Clearchannel bought Nationwide Communications and WNCI/WCOL this facility houses WHOK/Q-FM96)<br />Greg Ardrey at WCOL Radio, 1996-1997<br />
  2. 2. The lobby of WCOL<br />
  3. 3. The studios and engineering are down the hallway<br />
  4. 4. In the garage under Nationwide Plaza, the WCOL van and the WNCI van are housed. The WCOL van is getting a refit with new equipment.<br />
  5. 5. Here is the before shot. Everything has been removed except for the Caterpillar battery and mast. The battery is used to provide power to remote broadcast equipment.<br />
  6. 6. The old rack is sitting in the shop and we are stripping the equipment from it.<br />
  7. 7. The WCOL engineering shop. The back wall is full of patch panels for the studios.<br />
  8. 8. This workstation is my little corner of the station.<br />
  9. 9. The van after Kevin, my boss finished carpeting it.<br />
  10. 10. Phase 1: moving the old equipment to the new rack and adding some of the new gear at the top.<br />
  11. 11. Wiring it all up.<br />
  12. 12. The rack is reinstalled in the side cargo door of the van for easy access.<br />
  13. 13. My new components replace the old equipment.<br />
  14. 14. A radio, wireless mic, feedback filter, audio mixer, and a jack panel that I built. My power control panel below that along with electronics to control raising the mast, a shore power relay and fuses. This connects to the big cat battery shown earlier.<br />
  15. 15. The remote broadcast transmitter, blank panels and a storage drawer for cables, mics, etc.<br />
  16. 16. In the van, promotions gear including the table, prize wheel, and a 2-wheeler.<br />
  17. 17. The van at a promotional appearance<br />
  18. 18. The antenna is not on the mast yet.<br />
  19. 19. Getting their boots shined courtesy of the station<br />
  20. 20. The AM transmitter site and backup FM site<br />
  21. 21. The gray storage shed, the block fallout shelter, and at the back the transmitter building. WCOL was once a civil defense primary station and had a real fallout shelter. The walls and ceiling are 2 feet thick dirt and concrete.<br />
  22. 22. The transmitters: 1000W AM on the left in black, backup AM next to it. On the right of the doorway, the backup FM and a rack full of supporting equipment.<br />
  23. 23. In the middle of the room, more audio equipment in 3 racks. Power panels on the back wall.<br />
  24. 24. In the bomb shelter, an antique audio board from the 60s<br />
  25. 25. Dixie and Skip making an appearance at Jeffersonville Outlet Mall<br />
  26. 26. Posing with the winners<br />
  27. 27. At Channel 10's transmitter building, the main transmitter for WCOL in black. The copper pipe at the top is actually the antenna cable, called a waveguide.<br />
  28. 28. A closer look at the transmitter. Because of the cooling fan, it looks and sounds more like a furnace than a transmitter<br />
  29. 29. Supporting equipment includes redundant Studio Transmitter Links (dark grey boxes) and audio processing and filtering equipment.<br />
  30. 30. Inside the STL. This box gets the signal sent from the studio downtown and feeds it to the transmitter.<br />
  31. 31. Channel 10's tower has 9 radio stations and 3 TV stations on it. These "pipes" are waveguides that combine the signals and block them from feeding back on each other before they go up the tower.<br />
  32. 32. More of the combiner<br />
  33. 33. This is the gangway at the bottom of the tower. It has a 3 person elevator going up the middle of the tower. Notice the stairs above the gangway to get an idea of the scale.<br />
  34. 34. Looking up at the top of the tower.<br />
  35. 35. Photo from a staff party.<br />
  36. 36. WRFD radio and WCOL struck a deal where they moved into our site and rented space. This is the beginning of installing their transmitter. This is part of it.<br />
  37. 37. Here's the other part of their transmitter.<br />
  38. 38. working on the install<br />
  39. 39. Unloading the rest of it.<br />
  40. 40. The transmitter assembled in place.<br />
  41. 41. The inside of the beast.<br />
  42. 42. That brown thing at the bottom is the power transformer! It is wired with car jumper cable sized wring.<br />
  43. 43. Back at the studio, we installed the Emergency Alert System boxes. The government replaced the old Emergency Broadcast System with the Emergency Alert System.<br />
  44. 44. Here are the two boxes, one with printer paper coming out of the front.<br />
  45. 45. A typical studio<br />
  46. 46. An appearance with Alabama<br />
  47. 47. Everyone wanted pictures with the band<br />
  48. 48. Dixie and John-Boy Crenshaw<br />
  49. 49. The Van that I rebuilt<br />
  50. 50. The crowd coming to see Alabama<br />
  51. 51. Putting in the new AudioVAULT automation system. Two servers in the left hand rack (WCOLA & WCOLB) will hold our music and commercial library. The music will no longer be played from CD or Cart machines.<br />
  52. 52. Note the nice clean wiring in the racks<br />
  53. 53. The same studio from before with the computer on the "dentist arm" as Skip would call it.<br />
  54. 54. A magazine was doing a story on our new system, I was asked to stand in for a lighting test for the photographer.<br />
  55. 55. Remote broadcast from Polaris<br />
  56. 56. The Van, mast up and on the air.<br />
  57. 57.
  58. 58. More work at the backup site. These are the waveguides running to the tower.<br />
  59. 59. The base of the tower. The tower has a charge of 12,000 volts and you are not allowed within 20 feet when it is on the air.<br />
  60. 60. Electrical work for WRFD<br />
  61. 61.
  62. 62. Refitting to old bomb shelter to become a backup studio after we were forced to evacuate Nationwide Plaza because of a bomb scare at the federal building.<br />
  63. 63. We mounted a dehumidifier to the wall so we could drain it through a tube in the bomb shelter wall that was meant to be used to sample outside radiation levels with a Geiger counter.<br />
  64. 64. Replacing that antique audio board with current technology. The old board went to a museum.<br />
  65. 65.
  66. 66.
  67. 67. Electrical is done for WRFD<br />
  68. 68. Installing two VHS HiFI VCRs with two 6 hour tapes of emergency programming for each station (the FM and the AM).<br />
  69. 69. The WRFD transmitter completed<br />
  70. 70. A dial in audio interface that I built at the station.<br />
  71. 71. A program switch box that I built used for taking control of the stations from the transmitter site.<br />
  72. 72. A peek inside at the wiring<br />
  73. 73. A remote control for the same box<br />
  74. 74. An upgraded version of the remote van controls.<br />
  75. 75. The wiring in the power control box<br />
  76. 76. A closer look.<br />

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