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Charter for Involvement Evaluation Report June 2012

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Members of the National Involvement Network (NIN) have been working with ARC Scotland and Evaluation Support Scotland to evaluate what difference the Charter for Involvement has made to peoples lives. …

Members of the National Involvement Network (NIN) have been working with ARC Scotland and Evaluation Support Scotland to evaluate what difference the Charter for Involvement has made to peoples lives. Here is their final report.


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  • 1. “ The Charter is a brilliant template for organisations “ on the inclusion journey Charter for InvolvementEvaluation Report June 2012“ I would like tosit at the top tableand speak about “ how my life is changing Supported by The NationalInvolvement Network Charter for Involvement
  • 2. National Involvement NetworkAbout the Charter forInvolvement The Charter for Involvement was written by a group of people who use services in Scotland called the National Involvement Network. There are 13 statements in the Charter that say how we want to be involved in how the organisations that support us are planned and run. It was published in 2009. People who are in charge of 22 support organisations have since committed their organisation to putting the Charter statements and principles into action.For more information about the Charter for Involvement and theNational Involvement Network please visit the ARC Scotland websitewww.arcuk.org.uk/scotland or phone us on 0131 663 4444Talking about this Evaluation Report:National Involvement Network MeetingJune 20122 Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012
  • 3. National Involvement NetworkAbout the Evaluation4 members of the National Involvement Network carried out this evaluation.We wanted to find out what difference the Charter for Involvement has made topeople’s lives. It has taken us over a year to do this evaluation. Here are someof our comments: “I used to panic in a room with lots of people. Now I can sit in a room and listen to what people say” “Things don’t need to be difficult to get your point across. It will let folk see that people with learning disabilities are not stupid and can say what they want very clearly” “I feel more confident, being able to sit and talk to people without having help. I would never have been able to do that before”The main differences we hope that the Charter is making topeoples lives are (these are called ‘outcomes’):3 We are more active in making the organisations that support us better3 We are more able to make decisions about our lives3 We are more skilled and confident in speaking up for ourselves and othersCharter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012 3
  • 4. National Involvement NetworkWe sent questionnaires to the chief executives of the organisations that have‘signed up’ to the Charter to find out if these things are happening. Chiefexecutives are the people who run organisations. We got 14 responses to thisand wrote an ‘interim report’.We then met 46 people who get support from 7 different voluntaryorganisations to find out what they think. All of the organisations supportedpeople with learning disabilities.We made it clear to everyone that we were evaluating the Charter not theorganisation.The Charter Evaluation group are:Heather Davidson Magnus McIvor Lynnette Linton Caroline GrayWe would like to thank the following for their help, advice and support in thewriting of this report. Geeta Patel (Garvald Edinburgh), Gillian Barclay (HanselAlliance), James Fletcher (ARC Scotland). Thanks also to Graeme Reekie fromEvaluation Support Scotland who advised us as to how the report should look,Lindsay Graham who attended the interviews with us and FAIR for the pictures.All of your support was very much appreciated.4 Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012
  • 5. National Involvement NetworkWhat we learned(our conclusions)The Charter has helped people who get support to be more involved.The differences we hoped for have happened for at least 1,750people.People who get support and chief executives are positive about the differencethat the Charter has made. People who get support are usually more positivethan the chief executives. They give similar examples about how the Charterhas helped. But there are differences too. People who get support are lesssure about how much the Charter has helped them to be involved in choosingtheir staff than chief executives. People who get support often spoke aboutfeeling more listened to and respected because of the Charter.We learned which statements in the Charter are helping to make a bigdifference (for example We want to be at the HEART of any plans aboutOUR lives). We also learned there are statements we need to be clearer about(for example We want to be involved with our Boards and ManagementCommittees).We got lots of good comments about the Charter, and ideas for how we canimprove it. These are at the end of this report.Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012 5
  • 6. National Involvement NetworkWhat people told usAll of the Charter statements shown in this report are marked with a... Charter StatementWe have written two separate reports that give more detail about whatchief executives and people who get support told us. You can see these atwww.arcuk.org.uk/scotland or call 0131 663 4444 and we will send you acopy.6 Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012
  • 7. National Involvement Network Outcome: We are more active in making the organisations that support us betterQ1. How much differencehas the Chartermade to how yourorganisation is run? Chief executives People who use services 15 35 14 13 30 12 11 25 10 9 20 Number of people Number of people 8 7 15 6 5 4 10 3 2 5 1 A lot Some A little None / A lot Some A little None / Not sure Not sure Answers given Answers givenCharter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012 7
  • 8. National Involvement Network “We already had a level of involvement and aspiration to improve this. The Charter has acted as a catalyst for this” “The Charter has helped because our involvement is in writing and to see it on paper makes us proud”Chief executives and people who get support agree the Charter has madea difference. Most people who get support think that the Charter has mademore difference than chief executives do. Some people in charge told us that: • They are only just starting to improve involvement (3 organisations) • They already had good levels of involvement (4 organisations).Even so, both groups used the same examples of what differences havehappened: We want to be involved with our Boards and Management Committees: People who use services and chief executives agree that there CharterStatement are better links between people who use services and Management Boards. More people who get support are taking part in Board meetings, but not many organisations are doing this. We want to be involved in writing policies that affect us: People who use services and chief executives agree that there Charter is improved involvement of people in writing policies. TheseStatement include; Safeguarding, Involvement, Volunteers, Holidays, Recruitment, Support Plans and Complaints Procedures.8 Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012
  • 9. National Involvement Network We want to be involved in making policies that affect us easier to understand: CharterStatement More policies are written using easy read or put on a DVD. We want to be involved in choosing our support workers and other staff: CharterStatement People who use services and chief executives agree that people are more involved in choosing staff. There is more information about this later in this report (see question 4). We want to be involved in evaluating the service we use: CharterStatement More organisations are involving the people that they support in evaluating what they do, such as setting up evaluation groups, supporting people to use the Charter and getting involved with staff appraisals. We want to give information and training to staff at all levels: CharterStatement People who use services and chief executives agree that more people have been supported to get skills to train staff. More people are involved in training staff, but not everyone who gets support wants to do this.Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012 9
  • 10. National Involvement NetworkQ2. How much do youthink the people thatget support should beinvolved in how theorganisation is plannedand run? Chief executives People who use services 15 35 14 13 30 12 11 25 10 9 20 Number of people Number of people 8 7 15 6 5 4 10 3 2 5 1 A lot Some A little None / A lot Some A little None / Not sure Not sure Answers given Answers given10 Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012
  • 11. National Involvement Network “I want to be right in the middle of making decisions” Nearly all chief executives and people who use services agree that people should be involved a lot in how organisations are planned and run. We can’t be sure that people think this way because of the Charter. But a big part of the Charter is that organisations should work with the people they support to produce an action plan for involvement, and 10 of the 14 organisations had done this. People in four of the groups that we met with want to be more involved. Others were unsure about how much more involvement they wanted.Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012 11
  • 12. National Involvement Network Outcome: We are more able to make decisions about our livesQ3. How much do you think theCharter has helped you tobe at the HEART of any plansabout your life? Chief executives People who use services 15 35 14 13 30 12 11 25 10 9 20 Number of people Number of people 8 7 15 6 5 4 10 3 2 5 1 A lot Some A little None / A lot Some A little None / Not sure Not sure Answers given Answers given12 Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012
  • 13. National Involvement Network “The Charter has helped me do more on my own” “We are rolling out person centred plans for everyone in the organisation who wants one” We want to be at the HEART of any plans about OUR lives: CharterStatement Chief executives seem less sure than people who use services that the Charter has made a lot of difference, but most agree that some difference has been made. Again, 3 organisations said they were already doing this. People who get support and chief executives agree that people are more involved in their plans and more plans are made in an accessible way, for example using DVDs and pictures. There are also better easier to understand support plan policies. We think it is interesting that lots of people who get support said that they felt more listened to and respected because of the Charter. Some people gave examples of having more choice in their lives. In some cases this has led to them having more independence, for example moving home, getting support to find work and being more involved in their local community.Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012 13
  • 14. National Involvement NetworkQ4. (How much) do youthink the Charter hashelped you to be moreinvolved in choosingyour support workerand other staff? Chief executives People who use services 15 35 14 13 30 12 11 25 10 9 20 Number of people Number of people 8 7 6 15 5 4 10 3 2 5 1 Yes No A lot Some A little None / Not sure Answers given Answers given14 Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012
  • 15. National Involvement Network “It’s better since using the Charter, you can choose your own staff” “It hasn’t changed very much – I don’t get to give input” “We did this before the Charter so it has not helped a lot” “The Charter has brought this to the fore and it has been prioritised” We want to be involved in choosing our support workers and other staff: CharterStatement People who use services and chief executives agree that more people are involved in choosing staff. But this time it is people who get support that are less sure about the difference that the Charter has made. We learned that most organisations only have a small number of people who are involved in choosing staff, and they are not always choosing their own staff. Lots of people told us that they want to be involved in choosing staff but don’t get the chance. Also, only two of the groups said that they had a say in who gets the job, most people said that it was up to managers to decide. Only one group said they were involved in writing job descriptions.Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012 15
  • 16. National Involvement Network Outcome: We are more skilled and confident in speaking up for ourselves and othersQ5. How much do you think theCharter has helped youto get more involved incampaigning and speakingup groups? Chief executives People who use services 15 35 14 13 30 12 11 25 10 9 20 Number of people Number of people 8 7 15 6 5 10 4 3 2 5 1 A lot Some A little None / A lot Some A little None / Not sure Not sure Answers given Answers given16 Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012
  • 17. National Involvement Network We want the chance and the choice to get involved in local and national campaigns: CharterStatement This is the question with the biggest differences between the chief executives and people who get support. We heard lots of examples of people who get support getting involved in campaigns and speaking up groups. It may be that the people we spoke to were already the most involved people. Still, we heard good examples of people campaigning out-with the organisation they receive support from, like speaking to councillors and local authorities about things that affect them. Most people felt that the Charter has made some or a lot of difference to this. Most of the people who get support we spoke to knew about the National Involvement Network (NIN) or went to NIN meetings. Most chief executives knew about the NIN meetings too. But they were less sure about what difference the Charter has made to people getting involved in campaigns and speaking up groups apart from this.Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012 17
  • 18. National Involvement NetworkQ6. What do you thinkabout the Charter? Doyou have any ideas tomake it better? We got lots of good comments about the Charter from both groups: “It’s good enough so it’s hard to think of new ideas” “It’s important to tell others about the Charter” “It is a good document model for good practice” “The Charter is a brilliant template for organisations on the inclusion journey”18 Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012
  • 19. National Involvement NetworkWhat we will do nextWe also got ideas for how we can make the Charter better. They are:Make the Charter clearer3 Make the main message in the Charter more clear – that it is about being listened to and respected3 Have stories in the charter that show how people have got involved3 Make it clearer about how people should be involved in choosing their staff3 Make it clearer about how people should be involved in Management Boards and CommitteesMake the Charter easier to understand3 Re-publish the Charter book with fewer words and more pictures3 Make a DVD about the Charter3 Have posters about the CharterGet more people involved in the Charter3 Have more people from rural areas involved in the Charter3 Have more people with different support needs involved in the Charter3 Help big national organisations to get the message about the Charter across to everyone they support and all their staffThe members of the Charter evaluation group have spoken with the otherNIN members about these ideas. NIN members have agreed to work tomake these things happen. Would YOU like to get involved? Please contactus at arc.scotland@arcuk.org.uk or call 0131 663 444.Charter for Involvement • Evaluation Report: June 2012 19