EAD at Metro 09-25-13

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Introduction to Encoded Archival Description at the Metropolitan Library Council, NYC. EAD 2002

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  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/carowallis1/2314716161/sizes/m/in/photostream/Will be available on slideshare – many links on images and in text in the later portion of the presentation
  • https://secure.flickr.com/photos/cordlesscorey/3365173969/sizes/m/in/photostream/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/e_ubon/4312466853/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • Familiar with html? Similar (tags aka mark-up), but data structure, not displayXML (eXtensible Markup Language): set of rules for structuring data via markup
  • DTD and schema define the buckets; the list of tags in the tag library (we’ll see later) is defined here. Move to schema is coming; more flexible; not something you need to know right awayhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/linneberg/4481309196/sizes/m/in/photostream/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnkay/3539126525/sizes/m/in/photostream/Note that it is hierarchical – nested. Parent elements apply to child elements.
  • Encoding standards are rules for defining buckets; content standards are rules for the information insidehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/linneberg/4481309196/sizes/m/in/photostream/Xml, EAD, MARC are ways to structure your data, they are not the same as the descriptive data such as the finding aid, the catalog record, etc.
  • http://www.archivists.org/glossary/term_details.asp?DefinitionKey=66http://www.flickr.com/photos/osuarchives/3427510628/sizes/m/in/photostream/
  • EAD cookbook
  • An EAD-encoded finding aid is split into info about institution/FA (metametadata) and info about materials (the finding aid)
  • id.loc.gov<p> to structure text
  • So-called “empty element” – all the data is within the tag
  • Looking at the real thing
  • Extremely unlikely you will be asked to type it all out by hand. Temples, programs, guidance.
  • Software is free (like kittens, not like beer) Designed by archivists: interface is intuitive Manages most common archival processes Designed for metadata standardsOutput – html, eadBuilt on a database (MySQL)
  • “ICA-AtoM is web-based archival description software that is based on International Council on Archives ('ICA') standards. 'AtoM' is an acronymn for 'Access to Memory'.”
  • Basic, powerful XML editor. You can safely ignore about 95% of the buttons and drop-downs, but will do things like suggest valid tags and attributes, close tags, and validate as you go. This is what we use.
  • Software is free (like kittens, not like beer) Designed by archivists: interface is intuitive Manages most common archival processes Designed for metadata standardsOutput – html, eadBuilt on a database (MySQL)
  • http://clir.pacscl.org/2012/03/19/excel-to-xml-the-spreadsheet-from-heaven/
  • http://www2.archivists.org/standards
  • http://www.loc.gov/ead/tglib/element_index.html
  • http://www2.archivists.org/standards
  • XSLT (Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations) is a declarative, XML-based language used for the transformation of XML documents. Here, the EAD tag processinfo is converted into HTML.
  • Results returned a correct level of hierarchy, linking back to full finding aid.
  • http://www2.archivists.org/sites/all/files/eadRevisionProgress_2013-08-16.pptx
  • http://www.slideshare.net/mikerush/ead-revision-progress-report-20120808
  • http://www.slideshare.net/mikerush/ead-revision-progress-report-20120808
  • Thirty Years On: SAA and Descriptive Standards
  • Thirty Years On: SAA and Descriptive Standards
  • https://secure.flickr.com/photos/flik/172629460/sizes/z/in/photostream/
  • http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/cph/item/2005681364/resource/
  • XSLT (Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations) is a declarative, XML-based language used for the transformation of XML documents. Here, the EAD tag processinfo is converted into HTML.
  • We’ll be logically consistent, but in real world there are more things to correct and consider.
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/josephroth_07_reel07#page/n563/mode/1up
  • Stylesheet created by Michele Combs of Syracuse.
  • Stylesheet created by Michele Combs of Syracuse.
  • http://www.loc.gov/ead/eadschema.html
  • https://secure.flickr.com/photos/loneblackrider/315302588/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • https://secure.flickr.com/photos/elnegro/233434144/sizes/z/in/photostream/
  • http://www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
  • Links are in comments and in slides
  • EAD at Metro 09-25-13

    1. 1. Metropolitan New York Library Council 1
    2. 2. Outline I. The Basics II. Finding Aid III. Implementation Break IV. Exercises 2
    3. 3. Introductions 3
    4. 4. Relax! 4
    5. 5. I. The Basics 5
    6. 6. What is EAD? XML standard for encoding finding aids I. Basics 6
    7. 7. 7 XML standard for encoding finding aids I. Basics - What is EAD? XML (eXtensible Markup Language): a set of rules for structuring data via markup
    8. 8. 8 XML standard for encoding finding aids I. Basics - What is EAD? Tag: <unitdate era=“ce”>2011</unitdate> Attribute: <unitdate era=“ce”>2011</unitdate> Element: <unitdate era=“ce”>2011</unitdate>
    9. 9. Elements and attributes defined by a Document Type Definition (DTD) or a Schema <bioghist> <bionote> 9 I. Basics - What is EAD? XML standard for encoding finding aids
    10. 10. <ead> <eadheader> <titleproper>Guide to the Papers of Joseph Roth </titleproper> </eadheader> </ead> 10 XML standard for encoding finding aids I. Basics - What is EAD?
    11. 11. XML standard for encoding finding aids Defined set of containers for descriptive data EAD : DACS = MARC : AACR2 11 I. Basics - What is EAD?
    12. 12. XML standard for encoding finding aids A description of records that gives the repository physical and intellectual control over the materials and that assists users to gain access to and understand the materials (SAA) Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) 12 I. Basics - What is EAD?
    13. 13. What is EAD? XML standard for encoding finding aids I. Basics 13
    14. 14. What is EAD? EAD encoding is not a substitute for sound archival description! I. Basics 14
    15. 15. A Brief Aside: DACS Describing Archives: A Content Standard “rules to ensure the creation of consistent, appropriate, and self- explanatory descriptions of archival material.” I. Basics 15
    16. 16. I. Basics 16 I. Basics
    17. 17. II. Finding Aid 17
    18. 18. EAD Finding Aid Structure <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE ead SYSTEM "ead.dtd"> or <ead xsi:schemaLocation="urn:isbn:1-931666-22-9 http://www.loc.gov/ead/ead.xsd"> <?xml-stylesheet type="text/xsl" href="lbi2010.xsl"?> II. Finding Aid 18
    19. 19. EAD Finding Aid Structure <ead> <eadheader>Information about repository and finding aid</eadheader> <archdesc>Description of archival materials</archdesc> </ead> II. Finding Aid 19
    20. 20. Common Tags • Structural and content tags <eadheader>Many other tags</eadheader> <date>July 4, 1776</date> II. Finding Aid 20
    21. 21. Common Tags <eadheader> • Finding aid author <titlestmt> <author>Processed by Stanislav Pejša.</author> </titlestmt> II. Finding Aid 21
    22. 22. Common Tags <archdesc> • Minimum required description – “high-level did” <did> <origination>Roth, Joseph</origination> <unittitle>Joseph Roth Collection</unittitle> <unitdate>undated, 1890-2005</unitdate> <abstract>[short descriptive text]</abstract> *…+ II. Finding Aid 22
    23. 23. Common Tags <archdesc> • Minimum required description – “high-level did” <did> *…+ <langmaterial>In German and English</langmaterial> <physdesc>1 linear foot</physdesc> <unitid>AR 10254</unitid> <repository>Leo Baeck Institute</repository> <physloc>V 11/2</physloc> </did> II. Finding Aid 23
    24. 24. Common Tags <archdesc> • Biographical information <bioghist><p>Joseph Roth was one of the most prominent Austrian writers of the first half of the 20th century.</p></bioghist> • Controlled vocabulary <controlaccess> <geogname encodinganalog="651$a" source="lcsh" authfilenumber="n 79040121">Austria</geogname> </controlaccess> II. Finding Aid 24
    25. 25. Common Tags <archdesc> • Description of Subordinate Components <dsc> <c01 level="series"> <c02>Folder 1 <c03>Item 1</c03> <c03>Item 2</c03> </c02> <c02>Folder 2</c02> </c01> II. Finding Aid 25
    26. 26. Common Tags <archdesc> • Description of Subordinate Components A Component <c> provides information about the content, context, and extent of a subordinate body of materials. Each <c> element identifies an intellectually logical section of the described materials. The physical filing separations between components do not always coincide with the intellectual separations. From EAD Tag library <http://www.loc.gov/ead/tglib/elements/c.html> II. Finding Aid 26
    27. 27. Common Tags <archdesc> • Description of Subordinate Components <dsc> <c01 level="series"> <did> <unittitle id="serII">Series II: Addenda</unittitle> <unitdate normal="1985/1996">1985-1996</unitdate> </did> <c02>Subordinate elements, such as folders</c02> </c01> II. Finding Aid 27
    28. 28. Common Tags <archdesc> • Description of Subordinate Components <c02> <did> <container type="box">2</container> <container type="folder">1</container> <unittitle>Articles</unittitle> <unitdate>1985-1994</unitdate> </did> </c02> II. Finding Aid 28
    29. 29. Common Tags <archdesc> • Digital Archival Object (<dao>) <c02> <did> *…+ <unittitle>Articles</unittitle> </did> <dao href="http://www.archive.org/stream/josephroth_07_r eel07#page/n218/mode/1up" actuate="onrequest" linktype="simple" show="new"/> </c02> II. Finding Aid 29
    30. 30. Common Tags – Human Readable? <dimensions> II. Finding Aid 30
    31. 31. Common Tags – Human Readable? <dimensions> A subelement of <physdesc> for information about the size of the materials being described; usually includes numerical data. II. Finding Aid 31
    32. 32. Common Tags – Human Readable? <famname> II. Finding Aid 32
    33. 33. Common Tags – Human Readable? <famname> The proper noun designation for a group of persons closely related by blood or persons who form a household. Includes single families and family groups, e.g., Patience Parker Family and Parker Family. II. Finding Aid 33
    34. 34. Common Tags – Human Readable? <revisiondesc> II. Finding Aid 34
    35. 35. Common Tags – Human Readable? <revisiondesc> An optional subelement of the <eadheader> for information about changes or alterations that have been made to the encoded finding aid. II. Finding Aid 35
    36. 36. EAD Finding Aid II. Finding Aid 36
    37. 37. oXygen Setup 37 II. Finding Aid 1. Start the oXygen XML editor program 2. Open “JosephRoth.xml” found in the EAD folder on the desktop
    38. 38. oXygen Setup 38 II. Finding Aid
    39. 39. III. Implementation 39
    40. 40. III. Implementation: Creating EAD 40
    41. 41. III. Implementation: Creating EAD 41 Archivists’ Toolkit Archon ArchivesSpace
    42. 42. ICA-AtoM III. Implementation: Creating EAD 42
    43. 43. oXygen III. Implementation: Creating EAD 43
    44. 44. III. Implementation: Creating EAD 44 NoteTab Dreamweaver EADitor Note Pad
    45. 45. PASCL spreadsheet III. Implementation: Creating EAD 45 “the spreadsheet from heaven”
    46. 46. My Workflow III. Implementation: Creating EAD 46
    47. 47. EAD Tag Library III. Implementation: Creating EAD 47
    48. 48. SAA Standards Portal III. Implementation: Creating EAD 48
    49. 49. III. Implementation: Using EAD 49
    50. 50. Now What? III. Implementation: Using EAD 50
    51. 51. XSLT 51 III. Implementation: Using EAD
    52. 52. Processing documents XML Document [EAD] XSLT Stylesheet XSLT Processor [Saxon, Xalan or other program, which can be built into oXygen ] HTML Document [Webpage or online finding aid] Text Document [csv (can be opened in Excel] XML Document [New EAD document, MaRCXML] The “Original Document” Not Changed The “Final or Output Document” New File III. Implementation: Using EAD
    53. 53. XSLT Starter Example Original Document XSLT Stylesheet Output Document <book> <title>Hello World Book</title> <date>1997</date> </book> <xsl:stylesheet> <xsl:template match=“book”> The title of my book is <value-of select=“title”>. </xsl:template> </xsl:stylesheet> The title of my book is Hello World Book. III. Implementation: Using EAD
    54. 54. EAD to HTML III. Implementation: Using EAD 54
    55. 55. EAD to HTML with DC III. Implementation: Using EAD 55
    56. 56. EAD to HTML with microdata III. Implementation: Using EAD 56
    57. 57. EAD to PDF III. Implementation: Using EAD 57
    58. 58. EAD to MARC III. Implementation: Using EAD 58
    59. 59. Other Uses • Integration with other standards (e.g. EAC-CPF) • Open Archives Initiative – Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) • EAD consortia • Metadata for digitized collections III. Implementation: Using EAD 59
    60. 60. Other Uses • Flexible search and display III. Implementation: Using EAD 60
    61. 61. The Future of EAD: EAD3 Beta release of EAD revision, August 2013 • Reduce semantic overload • Simplify and standardize links • Reduce mixed content • Add, deprecate, and delete elements • Revision is schema only III. Implementation: Using EAD 61
    62. 62. The Future of EAD: EAD3 III. Implementation: Using EAD 62 EAD 2002: <unitdate>1905-1993</unitdate> EAD3: <unitdatestructured> <daterange> <fromdate>1905</fromdate> <todate>1993</todate> </daterange> </unitdatestructured>
    63. 63. The Future of EAD: EAD3 • October 1, 2013: End of beta comment period • December 1, 2013: Deliver final schema and tag library to the SAA Standards Committee • Winter 2014: Submit new version to SAA Council for adoption, publish after adoption. SAA TS-EAD site III. Implementation: Using EAD 63
    64. 64. The Future of EAD: EAD3 “In an ideal world, EAD and EAC-CPF would be opaque to all but a few expert users, created when needed as secondary outputs from efficient and adaptable software tools with archivist-optimized interfaces.” Thirty Years On: SAA and Descriptive Standards III. Implementation: Using EAD 64
    65. 65. The Future of EAD: EAD3 “This next wave [of archival standards] is going to push beyond online versions of print-based document genres and embrace the Web as the native format for description—dynamic, diverse, and discoverable description.” Thirty Years On: SAA and Descriptive Standards III. Implementation: Using EAD 65
    66. 66. Relax! III. Implementation: Using EAD 66
    67. 67. IV. Exercises 67
    68. 68. Exercise Setup 68 IV. Exercises 1. Start the oXygen XML Editor program 2. Open “JosephRoth.xml” found in the EAD folder on the desktop
    69. 69. Exercise How To 69 IV. Exercises
    70. 70. Exercise How To 70 IV. Exercises
    71. 71. Exercise How To 71 IV. Exercises
    72. 72. Exercise How To 72 IV. Exercises
    73. 73. How does this work? XSLT! 73 IV. Exercises
    74. 74. Exercise How To 74 IV. Exercises 1. Make the change in the XML 2. Hit the red arrow to transform the XML to HTML 3. Examine the HTML in the browser
    75. 75. IV. Exercises Exercise How To - Tips 1. Be very careful with quotation marks and angle brackets <unitdate era="ce">2011</unitdate> 2. Copy and paste carefully - know where the cursor is 3. O/o are not the same as 0 4. Look up while typing
    76. 76. IV. Exercises Exercise How To - Tips Check for error messages
    77. 77. Processing the Joseph Roth Addendum You are a processing archivist at the Leo Baeck Institute. You have been asked to process an addendum to the Joseph Roth Collection, and to update the EAD finding aid accordingly. IV. Exercises 77 Austrian writer Joseph Roth (1894-1939)
    78. 78. Exercise 1: Housekeeping Update the information in the <eadheader> section to reflect your contribution. IV. Exercises 78
    79. 79. Exercise 1: Housekeeping <ead><eadheader><filedesc><titlestmt> <author>Processed by Stanislav Pejša. Addendum processed by [your name].</author> IV. Exercises 79
    80. 80. The head archivist tells you that there is an error in the biographical information. Roth’s mother’s first name is Maria, not Mario. Fix this typo. IV. Exercises 80 Exercise 2: Biographical Information
    81. 81. <ead><archdesc> <bioghist><p> Find “Mario” and replace with “Maria” </p></bioghist> IV. Exercises 81 Exercise 2: Biographical Information
    82. 82. Looking at the existing controlled access points, you realize that the subject term for Roth’s birthplace, “Brody, Galicia” is incorrect. The proper LC term is “Brody (Ukraine)”. Correct the term. IV. Exercises 82 Exercise 3a: Geographic Information
    83. 83. <ead><archdesc><controlaccess> <geogname> Find “Brody, Galicia” and replace with “Brody (Ukraine)” </geogname> IV. Exercises 83 Exercise 3a: Geographic Information
    84. 84. Add the LC authority file number for “Brody (Ukraine)”. IV. Exercises 84 Exercise 3b: Geographic Information
    85. 85. Go to LC authorities: http://id.loc.gov Search for Brody (Ukraine) <ead><archdesc><controlaccess> <geogname encodinganalog="651bb0$a" role="subject" source="lcsh" authfilenumber="n88212572">Brody (Ukraine)</geogname> IV. Exercises 85 Exercise 3b: Geographic Information
    86. 86. IV. Exercises 86 Exercise 3b: Geographic Information
    87. 87. The addendum you are given is one folder, consisting of material in Polish from a 2002 conference about Roth. Add this folder to Series II: Addenda, and update the rest of the finding aid accordingly. IV. Exercises 87 Exercise 4: Adding a New Folder
    88. 88. The addendum you are given is one folder, consisting of material in Polish from a 2002 conference about Roth. Add this folder to Series II: Addenda, and update the rest of the finding aid accordingly. IV. Exercises 88 Exercise 4: Adding a New Folder "
    89. 89. What needs to be added? Where in the finding aid? IV. Exercises 89 Exercise 4a: Adding the Folder
    90. 90. <ead><archdesc><dsc><c01 level="series"> <c02> <did> <container type="box">2</container> <container type="folder">3</container> <unittitle>Polish conference</unittitle> <unitdate>2002</unitdate> </did> </c02> IV. Exercises 90 Exercise 4a: Adding the Folder
    91. 91. Does the date information need to be updated? IV. Exercises 91 Exercise 4b: Updating the Dates
    92. 92. Series-level date: <ead><archdesc><dsc><c01 level="series"><did> <unitdate normal="1985/2002" type="inclusive">1985-2002</unitdate> NB: Also at the collection level (high-level did), in the arrangement note, and in the title. IV. Exercises 92 Exercise 4b: Updating the Dates
    93. 93. Collection-level date: <ead><archdesc><did> Arrangement note date: <ead><archdesc><arrangement> Title date: <ead><eadheader><filedesc><titlestmt> IV. Exercises 93 Exercise 4b: Updating the Dates
    94. 94. Find the existing language information, and see if you can understand the format. Add Polish to the list of languages, at both the series and the collection levels. IV. Exercises 94 Exercise 4c: Updating the Language
    95. 95. <language langcode="pol">Polish</language> ISO639-2 code (id.loc.gov) IV. Exercises 95 Exercise 4c: Updating the Language
    96. 96. <ead><archdesc><did> and <ead><archdesc><dsc><c01 level="series"><did> <langmaterial>This series is in <language langcode="ger">German</language>, <language langcode="eng">English</language>, and <language langcode="pol">Polish</language>.</langmaterial> IV. Exercises 96 Exercise 4c: Updating the Language
    97. 97. Add one sentence to the Series II scope note reflecting the additional folder. IV. Exercises 97 Exercise 4d: Updating the Series II Scope Note
    98. 98. <ead><archdesc><dsc><c01 level="series"><scopecontent><p>This series consists of material that was added to the collection after the inventory was drafted and the bulk of the collection organized. *…+ Also included are materials from a 2002 conference in Poland.</p></scopecontent> IV. Exercises 98 Exercise 4d: Updating the Series II Scope Note
    99. 99. Link to the digitized version of the material in the additional folder using this link: http://bit.ly/x7944b IV. Exercises 99 Exercise 5: Adding a link to the digital object
    100. 100. <ead><archdesc><dsc><c01 level="series"> <c02> <did>*…+</did> <dao href="http://bit.ly/x7944b" actuate="onrequest" show="new"/> </c02> IV. Exercises 100 Exercise 5: Adding a link to the digital object
    101. 101. The head archivist has asked you to print out copies of your EAD finding aid for the reading room. Create a print-friendly HTML file. IV. Exercises 101 Exercise 6: Creating a Print-Friendly File
    102. 102. Find a stylesheet and save it in your EAD folder. (We’ve done this for you – thanks Syracuse!) Change the stylesheet declaration: <?xml-stylesheet type="text/xsl" href="eadprint-su.xsl"?> IV. Exercises 102 Exercise 6: Creating a Print-Friendly File
    103. 103. IV. Exercises 103 Exercise 6: Creating a Print-Friendly File
    104. 104. The head librarian has asked you to supply a MARC record for your archival collection. Generate a MARCXML record from this EAD. IV. Exercises 104 Exercise 7: Generating a MARC Record
    105. 105. Find an appropriate stylesheet. (We’ve done this for you) Set up a new transformation scenario. IV. Exercises 105 Exercise 7: Generating a MARC Record
    106. 106. IV. Exercises 106 Exercise 7: Generating a MARC Record
    107. 107. IV. Exercises 107 Exercise 7: Generating a MARC Record Click new, then select “XML transformation with XSLT”
    108. 108. IV. Exercises 108 Exercise 7: Generating a MARC Record
    109. 109. IV. Exercises 109 Exercise 7: Generating a MARC Record
    110. 110. IV. Exercises 110 Exercise 7: Generating a MARC Record
    111. 111. IV. Exercises 111 Exercise 7: Generating a MARC Record
    112. 112. The first step in migrating existing finding aids to EAD3 is to convert from DTD-based to schema- based files. Convert a DTD-based finding aid to a schema-based finding aid. IV. Exercises 112 Exercise 8: Converting from DTD to Schema
    113. 113. Find an appropriate stylesheet. (dtd2schema_metro.xsl) Set up and run a new transformation scenario. (Follow the directions in exercise 7) IV. Exercises 113 Exercise 8a: Converting from DTD to Schema
    114. 114. IV. Exercises 114 Exercise 8b: Converting from DTD to Schema There is improperly coded data in the “normal” attribute of the <date> tag (see the error message). Fix this.
    115. 115. IV. Exercises 115 Exercise 8b: Converting from DTD to Schema Dates are encoded in the format YYYY-MM:
    116. 116. IV. Exercises 116 Exercise 8b: Converting from DTD to Schema Note also that attributes governing link behavior have been converted to comply with Xlink:
    117. 117. IV. Exercises 117 Questions?
    118. 118. Resources 118
    119. 119. EAD Tools Resources 119
    120. 120. Tinker! • Gentle Introduction to XML • EAD Cookbook • A free XML editor • Library of Congress EAD files Resources 120
    121. 121. Download via Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/archivistkevin Thank you! 121
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