ArchaeoLandscapes Europe      Networking Remote Sensing in Archaeology: Fostering Methods and Knowledge                   ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                         Content   • Remote Sensin...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                         Landscape Archaeology & Invisible Sites      http://www.aegypten-speziali...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                Beyond the Fascination of the Visible                             ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                         Beyond the Meaning of the Visible                        ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                     Non-invasive Methods for Research                            ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe        Visualisation – Public outreach & Lobby                                        Building   ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                          RS Data & Visualisations for the Public                                 ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                          RS Data & Visualisations for the Public                                 ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                          RS Data & Visualisations for the Public                                 ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                          RS Data & Visualisations for the Public                                 ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                   Expert Knowledge   •    Remote ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                   Knowledge and its Spread   •   ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe  ArchaeoLandscape Europe is supported by the  EU within the framework of the Culture 2007-  2013 ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe         61 Project Partner from all over Europe and Beyond   Coordinator/Project Leader          ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                   Project Aims • "To increase public appreciation...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                            A busy 5-year Programme ...  • Create a self-supporting ArchaeoLandsca...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                       Networking and Collaborating   • Building a...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                 Addressing the Archaeological Community   •    Technical Workshops: LiDAR, Aerial...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                   Addressing the Public   • Trave...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                   Addressing the Public   • Newsp...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                   Previous Activities   • Technic...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                   Previous Activities   • Symposi...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                   Previous Activities   • Grants ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                   Future Activities   • Technical...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                   Measuring Impact (?)   • Webpag...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                   Measuring Distribution         ...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                        Resume  • Knowing that the...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                   Further information    If you w...
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe                                                                   posluschny@rgk.dainst.de       ...
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Networking Remote Sensing

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Axel G. Posluschny: Networking Remote Sensing in Archaeology: Fostering Methods and Knowledge in Europe and Beyond - From International Associations Scattering Towards Globalization
Presentation at the Pacific Neighborhood Congress, Space2Place session, Berkeley/CA, 9/12/2012

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  • Dear colleagues, First of all I would like to thank the organisers of this meeting for the invitation and the opportunity to present the ArcLand project that I am currently working for. Prospection in all its various forms, has always been one of the major sources for archaeological knowledge. Especially aerial archeology has been of greater importance since crop marks, soils marks and so on became recognized as hints to former human remains and landscape artifacts. These methods have been supplemented by the growing application of computer or otherwise technologically based prospection methods like geophysics, LiDAR or satellite imagery. For your better understanding: When I talk about Remote Sensing I include geophysics as well, though of course one could argue that these techniques are not remote at all but to make things a bit easier I define these contactless methods as remote as well 
  • This meeting aims not to discuss technologies – in which you all are far more experienced than I am – but to focus on modern technologies and their impact on the conservation and communication of cultural heritage. To cite the invitation from Stefano and Maurizio: “ Networking and education at global scale of remote sensing in archaeology will also be a main topic of the conference. ” So I will give a very very brief overview about RS for cultural heritage before I will talk about certain aspects of knowledge distribution which form the background for the introduction to the ArchaeoLandscapes Europe project.
  • Before I started to work for ArcLand, I was involved in a number of landscape archaeological investigations – in fact I would call myself a landscape archaeologist. This is the background for my understanding of what I do now as well – seeing archaeological prospection and remote sensing as tools for landscape archaeology. But of course these things are also tools for site based research, conservation, documentation and so on – especially when we deal with all those invisible things that seem to be far less attractive or at least far less visible than the things that the general public thinks of when hearing the word “ archaeology ”
  • Making things visible is one of the main aims of remote sensing but making things visible is not only necessary for archaeologists who investigate a site or a landscape or for cultural heritage managers who aim to protect sites and landscapes – it can also be crucial to raise awareness for a specific site or for cultural heritage in general amongst the public.
  • Satellite images or LiDAR make it possible to monitor landscapes or to find the archaeological features that have to be protected before a looter can find it.
  • I am not going to preach to the converted – you all know what remote sensing, geophysics and other prospection methods can bring for archaeological research, for the investigation of a site, for the understanding of a landscape and its development over a period of thousands of years.
  • But remote sensing can do more than that, remote sensing can produce aesthetic pictures which attract people, which combine 2 things that many people have a positive connotation with – archaeology and high tech. We can explain things that are hard to understand as they are not visible and we can make them even interesting – for our colleagues as well as for the public, for those that we collaborate with as well as for those that pay our wages with their taxes.
  • Geophysics, LiDAR and aerial images can be simply nice to see, but they can also be speaking – speaking also for those that are not archaeological experts.
  • Google Earth has brought a totally new tool, a tool that not only archaeologists can use and understand but which also is of interest for the public. The picture of a gigantic earthwork like this one here in Romania (the length of the red line is about 2800 m) shows the fascination of remote sensing even when it is done from an arm chair.
  • And of course LiDAR with its ability to look beyond the forest canopy is still not just a useful tool but it also creates astonishing effects both for the experts and the laymen
  • as this example from an early Iron Age hillfort in the Czech republic shows
  • The big problem is, that Remote Sensing needs a lot of expert knowledge. RS is more than just pushing buttons, moreover, it ’ s more than buying data or even worse, their interpretation. Archaeologists like me – and in this case I am excluding people like you here in the audience who all are technical experts as well – often pay (technical) experts to do remote sensing for them. What they get as a result/product is often a filtered interpretation, based on the technicians experience. They don ’ t get the real data and even if so, many archaeologists wouldn ’ t be able to deal with that
  • Expert knowledge about RS is not evenly distributed amongst archaeologists in Europe, nor world-wide Acquiring RS data as well as dealing with that data in a sufficient way is not being taught with the same intensity and on a regular basis at universities all over Europe There is still a lack of education in these methods in many parts of Europe and also in the rest of the world
  • Based on the experience that the knowledge and the use of landscape archaeology in general and modern surveying techniques in particular are not evenly distributed all over Europe we have created the ArchaeoLandscapes Europe project, short ArcLand . Wit a budget of 5 Million Euros all in all (which more or less equals to 6.5 Million US Dollars) we aim to equal these differences and to develop a self-sustaining network that will carry on with this task even beyond the project ’ s life span of 5 years.
  • The project consortium so far consists of 61 partner institutions from all over Europe as well as one partner from Australia and one from the USA. These partners represent experts in various fields of remote sensing, geophysics, aerial archaeology, GIS and so on and also partners that act as network hubs in their country or region to act as a multiplicator of knowledge and expertise.
  • To cite the words of our project application, we aim "To increase public appreciation, understanding and conservation ..... of the landscape and archaeological heritage of Europe .... through the application and international sharing of skills and experience .... in airborne and other forms of remote sensing ”
  • The project consist of a number of so-called actions or work packages. We want to … Create a self-supporting ArchaeoLandscapes Network Europe Communicate the value of aerial survey, remote sensing and landscape studies Promote the pan-European exchange of people, skills and experience Enhance teaching in aerial survey, remote sensing and landscape studies Exploit existing air-photo archives more effectively Support aerial survey, remote sensing and landscape exploration Explore laser, satellite and other forms of remote sensing to a larger extent Provide technical guidance and advice on best practice
  • We want to reach our aims by a number of activities: We do not find it necessary to preach to the converted, but we think that building up a network of experts is a very important aspect of our work. Teaching with workshops & schools Sharing knowledge via publications, website and exchange visits Supporting students & young scholars Raising awareness for both the archaeological experts and the laymen
  • ArcLand is a project both for the experts and for the interested laymen. Our activities that address the archaeological community consist of: Technical Workshops: LiDAR, Aerial Archaeology, Geophysics, Satellite Imagery, UAV, Integrated Data Analyses, … Aerial Archaeology Training Schools 2 International Conferences (2013 Dublin, 2015 Frankfurt) Symposia, Workshops, Meetings, Conference Sessions, ... Publications (2 Monographs, Flyer, Conference Papers, Best Practices Guides, ...) Website http://www.archaeolandscapes.eu (the site will be updated continuously during the 3 coming years of the project) Grants for Students and Young Researchers to participate in Workshops, Schools and Conferences
  • Our activities that address the public consist of: Travelling exhibition, starting on 8 th May 2013 in Dublin Conference about RS & Community Archaeology as a starting event for the travelling exhibition (8 th – 11 th May 2013 in Dublin) Website http://www.archaeolandscapes.eu (the site will be updated continuously during the 3 coming years of the project) Flyer, sticker
  • Of course we try to be present in the media as well. Newspaper, radio & TV interviews: Spiegel Online: http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/remote-scanning-techniques-revolutionize-archaeology-a-846793.html - copied or used as the basis for other articles: http://videnskab.dk/teknologi/flyvende-lasere-afslorer-begravede-fortidsminder (DK) http://www.niburu.nl/archeologie/vliegende-lasers-sporen-ondergrondse-bouwwerken-op.html (NL) Politiken (DK) http://nachrichten.t-online.de/fliegender-laser-verraet-verschuettete-bauten/id_58398140/index (DE) http://yle.fi/radio1/kulttuuri/kultakuume/ => Kun hakku ja lapio eivät enää riitä (FI) Planned: TV documentaries about RS in archaeology
  • So far one of the main aspects of our work was teaching in various forms, especially with our workshops and aerial archaeology training schools. Technical Workshops Bibracte/FR – LiDAR Slane/IE – Geophysics, kite photography, data integration Poznan/PL – satellite & aerial images Klaipeda/LT – geophysics Ljubljana – 3D data Rethymno/GR – geophysics, satellite & aerial images Aerial Archaeology Training Schools Kostolac/RS Velling/DK Merida/ES Pilsen/CZ Kocaeli/TR
  • We have been visible and involved in a large number of conferences, workshops and meetings which besides supporting our outreach activities was also important to build up and widen our network and to stay in touch with the newest developments in archaeological remote sensing and surveying.
  • Grants for Students and Young Researchers to participate in Workshops, Schools and Conferences 43 grants have been paid from ArcLand : 19 for aerial archaeological training schools 16 for technical workshops 6 exchange visits / mobility grants 2 conference grants
  • We do plan of course more activities for the future, including more workshops and more aerial archaeology training schools as well as the aforementioned conference and exhibition, which either deal with or directly aim for a dialog with the broader public.
  • very successful as regards the hits and visits we expected 15.000 visits by the end of the project but have already reached 20.600 by now! we have 2 main peaks in the graph, one relates to opening a Facebook page in January and to a number of posts there which obviously made people curious about our work the second peak is clearly related to the aforementioned article on Spiegel Online in late July this year the article - available both in English and German - was copied or at least used as the basis for other online articles in at least Denmark and the Netherlands which also reflects the great interest the general public has in topics that connect archaeology and high tech.
  • the origin of visitors is in the meantime from all over the world. we even have people from Guyana, the Dutch Antilles, Gibraltar and from the Turks- and Caicos Islands (wherever that may be) but the majority of visitors come from Europe, Germany being the leading country, the United Kingdom, Spain, Italy, Poland and Ireland
  • Knowing that the use of all modern RS techniques and methods need skill, expertise and experience and being aware of the fact that these factors are not evenly distributed all over Europe (as well as in the rest of the world), the ArchaeoLandscapes Europe project, supported by the EU Culture 2007–2013 programme, aims for a better understanding and a more excessive use of modern archaeological surveying techniques as well as for an exchange of people, working in these fields, their expertise and of new ideas. Moreover, we think that involving the public in various ways is an important aspect of our work, fostering an understanding as well as public support for archaeological remote sensing.
  • If you want to know more about the project and the various (future) activities, opportunities and so on, visit our website
  • Thank you very much for your attention, I am looking forward to your question and hope we will have an interesting discussion!
  • Networking Remote Sensing

    1. 1. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Networking Remote Sensing in Archaeology: Fostering Methods and Knowledge in Europe and Beyond --- From International Associations Scattering Towards Globalization Dr. Axel G. Posluschny M.A. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Roman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute Palmengartenstr. 10-12 D-60325 Frankfurt posluschny@rgk.dainst.dewww.archaeolandscapes.eu
    2. 2. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Content • Remote Sensing & Surveying for Cultural Heritage Management • Knowledge, Expertise and their Distribution • ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Network introductionRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    3. 3. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Landscape Archaeology & Invisible Sites http://www.aegypten-spezialist.de/uploads/pics/gizeh-cheops-sphinx.jpg http://www.online-reisefuehrer.com/bilder-reisen/tuerkei/ephesos.jpg introduction – RS for CHM & research http://www.zum.de/Faecher/G/BW/Landeskunde/w3/provence/vienne/augustus1.jpg http://www.ohiotraveler.com/images/serpent%20mound.jpgRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    4. 4. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Beyond the Fascination of the Visible introduction – RS for CHM & researchRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    5. 5. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Beyond the Meaning of the Visible introduction – RS for CHM & research Cowley et al. 2010Roman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    6. 6. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Non-invasive Methods for Research introduction – RS for CHM & researchRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    7. 7. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Visualisation – Public outreach & Lobby Building introduction – RS for CHM & researchRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    8. 8. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe RS Data & Visualisations for the Public introduction – RS for CHM & researchRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    9. 9. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe RS Data & Visualisations for the Public introduction – RS for CHM & researchRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    10. 10. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe RS Data & Visualisations for the Public introduction – RS for CHM & researchRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    11. 11. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe RS Data & Visualisations for the Public introduction – RS for CHM & researchRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    12. 12. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Expert Knowledge • Remote Sensing needs expert knowledge • RS is more than just pushing buttons • RS is more than buying data or even worse, their interpretation • Archaeologists often pay (technical) experts to do remote sensing for them • What they get as a result/product is often a filtered interpretation, knowledge, expertise & distribution based on the technicians experience • They don’t get the real data and even if so, many archaeologists wouldn’t be able to deal with thatRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    13. 13. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Knowledge and its Spread • Expert knowledge about RS is not evenly distributed amongst archaeologists in Europe, nor world-wide • Acquiring RS data as well as dealing with that data in a sufficient way is not being taught with the same intensity and on a regular basis at universities all over Europe knowledge, expertise & distribution • There is still a lack of education in these methods in many parts of Europe and also in the rest of the worldRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    14. 14. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe ArchaeoLandscape Europe is supported by the EU within the framework of the Culture 2007- 2013 programme • Agreement Number: 2010-1486 • Start: 15th September 2010 • End: 14th September 2015 • EU Advancement: 2,5 Mio € • Total Budget: 5 Mio € • Partner Institutions: 61(at present) ArchaeoLandscapes network • Project Leadership: Roman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological InstituteRoman-Germanic Commission www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    15. 15. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe 61 Project Partner from all over Europe and Beyond Coordinator/Project Leader 3. Estonian Heritage Society (EE) 1. Roman-Germanic Commission, German Archaeological Institut (DE) 4. Aalto University School of Science and Technology (FI) 5. National Museum of the Faroe Islands (FO) Co-organisers: 6. Université de Franche Comté (FR) 1. In Flanders Fields Museum, Belgium (BE) 2. Cyprus Research and Education Foundation (STARC) (CY) 7. University of Applied Sciences - i3mainz (DE) 3. Holstebro Museum (DK) 8. University of Bamberg (DE) 4. State Heritage Service Baden-Wü rttemberg (DE) 9. University of Frankfurt (DE) 5. Institute for Mediterranean Studies (FORTH) (GR) 10. Aerial Archaeology Research Group (international) 6. Baranya County Museum Authority (HU) 11. Culture Lab - International Cultural Expertise (BE) 7. Institute of Archaeology (IS) 12. Dutch Expertise Centre for Archaeological Remote Sensing (NL/BE) 8. Discovery Programme (IE) 13. Dundalk Institute of Technology (IE) 9. University College Dublin (IE) 10. University of Foggia (IT) 14. Latvian Academy of Culture (LV) 11. University of Salento (LabTAF), Lecce (IT) 15. University of Granada (ES) 12. University of Siena (LAP&T) (IT) 16. University of Uppsala (SE) 13. University of Klaipeda (LT) 17. University of Ulster (IE) 14. University of Leiden (NL) 18. Landscape & Geophysical Services (IE) 15. Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU) (NO) 19. Macquarie University, NSW (AU) 16. Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (PL) 20. The DART Project - University of Leeds (UK) 17. Institute for Cultural Memory (CIMEC) (RO) 18. Institute of Archaeology (RS) 21. Leuven University (BE) 19. Slovak Academy of Sciences (SK) 22. Department of Earth and Environment of the Italian National 20. Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts (ZRC SAZU) (SI) Research Council (IT) ArchaeoLandscapes network 21. University of Ljubljana (SI) 23. University of Zagreb (HR) 22. Instituto de Estudos Galeos Padre Sarmiento (ES) 24. VU Amsterdam (NL) 23. English Heritage (UK) 25. Moesgaard Museum (DK) 24. University of Exeter (UK) 26. The Rathcroghan Heritage Centre (IE) 25. University of Glasgow (UK) 27. The Landscape Research Centre (UK) 26. Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (UK) 28. Polytechnic Institute of Tomar University (PT) 29. ArchaeoPhysica (UK) Associated Partners: 30. University of Bologna (IT) 1. University of Vienna (AT) 31. Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NO) 2. University of West Bohemia (CZ) 32. Szczecin University - Institute of History and International Relations, Department of Archaeology (PL) 33. University of California, Merced (USA) 34. Cyprus University of Technology (CY) ...Roman-Germanic Commission www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    16. 16. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Project Aims • "To increase public appreciation, understanding and conservation ..... – of the landscape and archaeological heritage – of Europe .... – through the application and international sharing of skills ArchaeoLandscapes network and experience .... • in airborne and other forms of remote sensing"Roman-Germanic Commission www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    17. 17. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe A busy 5-year Programme ... • Create a self-supporting ArchaeoLandscapes Network Europe • Communicate the value of aerial survey, remote sensing and landscape studies • Promote the pan-European exchange of people, skills and experience • Enhance teaching in aerial survey, remote sensing and landscape studies • Exploit existing air-photo archives more effectively ArchaeoLandscapes network • Support aerial survey, remote sensing and landscape exploration • Explore laser, satellite and other forms of remote sensing to a larger extent • Provide technical guidance and advice on best practiceRoman-Germanic Commission www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    18. 18. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Networking and Collaborating • Building a network of experts • Teaching with workshops & schools • Sharing knowledge via publications, website and exchange visits • Supporting students & young scholars ArchaeoLandscapes network • Raising awareness for both the archaeological experts and the laymenRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    19. 19. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Addressing the Archaeological Community • Technical Workshops: LiDAR, Aerial Archaeology, Geophysics, Satellite Imagery, UAV, Integrated Data Analyses, … • Aerial Archaeology Training Schools • 2 International Conferences (2013 Dublin, 2015 Frankfurt) • Symposia, Workshops, Meetings, Conference Sessions, ... • Publications (2 Monographs, Flyer, Conference Papers, Best Practices ArchaeoLandscapes network Guides, ...) • Website http://www.archaeolandscapes.eu (the site will be updated continuously during the 3 coming years of the project) • Grants for Students and Young Researchers to participate in Workshops, Schools and ConferencesRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    20. 20. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Addressing the Public • Travelling exhibition, starting on 8th May 2013 in Dublin • Conference about RS & Community Archaeology as a starting event for the travelling exhibition (8th – 11th May 2013 in Dublin) • Website http://www.archaeolandscapes.eu (the site will be updated continuously during the 3 coming years of the project) ArchaeoLandscapes network • Flyer, stickerRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    21. 21. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Addressing the Public • Newspaper, radio & TV interviews: • Spiegel Online: http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/remote- scanning-techniques-revolutionize-archaeology-a-846793.html - copied or used as the basis for other articles: • http://videnskab.dk/teknologi/flyvende-lasere-afslorer-begravede- fortidsminder (DK) • http://www.niburu.nl/archeologie/vliegende-lasers-sporen-ondergrondse- bouwwerken-op.html (NL) • Politiken (DK) ArchaeoLandscapes network • http://nachrichten.t-online.de/fliegender-laser-verraet-verschuettete- bauten/id_58398140/index (DE) • http://yle.fi/radio1/kulttuuri/kultakuume/ => Kun hakku ja lapio eivä t enä ä riitä (FI) • Planned: TV documentaries about RS in archaeologyRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    22. 22. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Previous Activities • Technical Workshops: • Bibracte/FR – LiDAR • Slane/IE – Geophysics, kite photography, data integration • Poznan/PL – satellite & aerial images • Klaipeda/LT – geophysics • Ljubljana/SL – 3D data • Rethymno/GR – geophysics, satellite & aerial images • Aerial Archaeology Training Schools: ArchaeoLandscapes network • Kostolac/RS • Velling/DK • Merida/ES • Pilsen/CZ • Kocaeli/TRRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    23. 23. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Previous Activities • Symposia, Workshops, Meetings, Conference Sessions: • CAA 2012, Southampton – ArcLand session • EAA 2011, Oslo – ArcLand session • EAA 2012, Helsinki – ArcLand session • UNESCO Best Practice Conference 2012, Menorca – 3 ArcLand related papers • ESOF – European Science Open Forum 2012, Dublin – ArcLand session • … ArchaeoLandscapes network • Publications (2 Monographs in print, Flyer, Conference Papers)Roman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    24. 24. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Previous Activities • Grants for Students and Young Researchers to participate in Workshops, Schools and Conferences • 43 grants have been paid from ArcLand: • 19 for aerial archaeological training schools • 16 for technical workshops • 6 exchange visits / mobility grants • 2 conference grants ArchaeoLandscapes networkRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    25. 25. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Future Activities • Technical Workshops: • Belgrade/RS – Archiving questions • Bamberg/DE – Airphoto interpretation • Rathcroghan/IE – Geophysics, LiDAR, data integration • Esslingen/DE – LiDAR • Montferrand/FR – LiDAR • Aerial Archaeology Training Schools: • Leuven/BE ArchaeoLandscapes network • Pecs/HURoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    26. 26. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Measuring Impact (?) • Webpage hits – estimated number of visits until the end of the project: 15,000 • number of visits by September 2012: 20,600 !!! ArchaeoLandscapes network 2 main peaks: •start of the Facebook page in January •Spiegel Online article in late JulyRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    27. 27. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Measuring Distribution ArchaeoLandscapes networkRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    28. 28. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Resume • Knowing that the use of all modern RS techniques and methods need skill, expertise and experience and being aware of the fact that these factors are not evenly distributed all over Europe (as well as in the rest of the world), the ArchaeoLandscapes Europe project, supported by the EU Culture 2007–2013 programme, aims for a better understanding and a more excessive use of modern archaeological surveying techniques as well as for an exchange of people, working in these fields, their expertise and of new ideas. • Moreover, we think that involving the public in various ways is conclusion an important aspect of our work, fostering an understanding as well as public support for archaeological remote sensing.Roman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    29. 29. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe Further information If you want to know more about the project and the various (future) activities, opportunities and so on, visit our website http://www.archaeolandscapes.eu arclandRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu
    30. 30. ArchaeoLandscapes Europe posluschny@rgk.dainst.de Thank you very much for your attentionRoman-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute www.archaeolandscapes.eu

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