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Logo illustrator project
 

Logo illustrator project

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  • 9 Keys to an Effective Logo\n
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  • Elements and Principles of Art\n
  • A line represents a "path" between two points. A line can be straight, curved, vertical, horizontal, diagonal, or zigzag. Lines imply motion and suggest direction or orientation. A line can also be implied, that is filled in by the mind when several points are positioned geometrically within a frame. Placing four dots on a page in the shape of a square can imply the points are linked as the mind searches for recognizable patterns. The direction and orientation of a line can also imply certain feelings. Horizontal lines imply tranquility and rest, whereas vertical lines imply power and strength. Oblique lines imply movement, action and change. Curved lines or S shaped lines imply quiet, calm and sensual feelings. Lines that converge imply depth, scale and distance - a fence or roadway converges into the distance provides the illusion that a flat two-dimensional image has three-dimensional depth. A line is an effective element of design because it can lead the viewer's eye. To create more effective photographs actively look for lines and arrange them within your viewfinder to invoke specific feelings.\n
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  • Frank Gehry \n
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  • Eames vs. Gehry \n
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  • http://kuler.adobe.com\nHenri de Toulouse-Lautrec\n\n
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  • PRINCIPLES OF ART\n
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Logo illustrator project Logo illustrator project Presentation Transcript

  • FA 2000 Illustrator Unit Project
  • FA 2000 Illustrator Unit Project
  • LOGO- is a unique symbol or design thatrepresents a companyLogos are theultimate mark ofdistinction andeveryone lovesthem. We seelogos everyday- on thehighways, onconsumergoods, on theWeb and in theinstitutions andorganizationswe support
  • A logo is a graphical element (ideogram, symbol, emblem, icon,sign) that, together with its logotype (a uniquely set andarranged typeface) form a trademark or commercial brand.Typically, a logos design is for immediate recognition. The logo isone aspect of a companys commercial brand, or economic oracademic entity, and its shapes, colors, fonts, and images usuallyare different from others in a similar market. Logos are also usedto identify organizations and other non-commercial entities.
  • Apple Logo DesignBased on its company name, they selected an apple as its main formof branding. Initially, the logo depicted a small apple shape sittingunder a tree with Apple Computer Co set into the frame of thepicture. It is this apple that has continued to be used. The first logodesign was perceived to be a bit too complex and hard to view, soRegis McKenna worked on the logo some years later and added a"bite mark" to symbolize the concept of seduction of the customersand the marketplace in general. Next, the monochrome version wasreplaced with the rainbow-colored logo as a reference to the Biblicalstory of Adam and Eve in which the apple represents the fruit of theTree of Knowledge. It brings to mind that people must pursue theirdreams. While this was not initially a deliberate goal, it did encouragebusiness and consumers to consider the Apple brand for the first timeand was successful in generating increased profits.
  • Allianz logoThis is the Logo of the largest Europeaninsurance company, Alliance 0, which hasbeen in business since 1890. This companyuses its logo as a coat of arms. In 1923the logo was developed into a graphicalrepresentation of the coat of arms, andlater it was further designed into threesimple lines which represented the birds inthe same way.
  • Starbucks logoThe worldwide coffee phenomenon that is Starbucks first beganin 1971 when the founders opened their inaugural store. Nowthere are more than 7,500 stores across the globe under thebrand of Starbucks Coffee Houses, serving more than 22 millionguests annually. The world famous logo represents theenvironment with which the company was established in thelakes area of Seattle, Washington. In addition, the logodepicting the lady and the water dates back to the old sailortradition of transporting coffee and the coffee trade. http://www.starbucks.com/preview
  • Create a personal logo using Illustrators vector tools.Logo is a visual communication tool expressing identity of brand orindividual through graphic elements such as lines, shapes texture andcolor.For this assignment create a personal logo to express identity of your brand(as individual, company, concept).You can use ideas from previous assignment, photomontage and abstractthem to simple shapes and lines.The logo design should be conceived with dynamic elements (paths thatexpress movement) in mind so you can use it in your next assignment as apart of animation.
  • Step 1. Design conception.•Write one page (double space 12 pt.) paper, describing a concept youwould like to represent with your design. Spend some time thinking whatyou like to do and writing down concepts and sketching ideas for yourproject.•Having good initial sketch is useful and saves you time. Scan your sketchand use it as a templet/guide to draw using vector.•After finalizing your concept begin work on your log icon to representthis concept. Start with black and white color initially to just focus onshape and lines that represent your idea.For this assignment use only vector Illustrator tools such as pen, pencil,shape tools, brush or line segment tool.
  • Step 2. Add color to your B&W logo•After you get the shape of your icon add color to your B&W logo. Usecolor to support your concept.•Color is another important element of your design.•Your color choices should support the logos concept
  • Step 3. Add text - logotype•Part of the logo design is also text which would support the logo. The textshould be 1 to 3 words long ( as simple as possible. For example Nike slogan"Just do it!").•Pay attention to details, how every element supports each other by itsplacement, size relationship, quality of lines and curves.
  • Turn in:1.Scanned initial sketch of your logo ideas.2.Black and white version of the logo - illustrator file.3.Color version of your logo - illustrator file4.The final version of your logo as a JPG file.5.One page statement describing your concept and idea, inspirationand process which you used to create your logo.Create a folder with your last name and Illustrator Project and dropit in the class drop box
  • Characteristics of good logo designConsistency and Unity of your design elementsMemorabilityMeaningfulnessUniquenessProfessionalism and qualityTimelessnessDifferentiationScalability, legibility
  • Student work examples
  • QDESIGN QDESIGN QDESIGN QDESIGN
  • Elements and Principles of Design 17
  • Composition Piet Mondrian, Composition AOrganization and arrangement of various visual elementsin artwork (usually based on Western aesthetics). 18
  • Composition Piet Mondrian, Composition AOrganization and arrangement of various visual elementsin artwork (usually based on Western aesthetics). 18
  • CompositionOrganizing the various elements within the frame of theviewfinder, page or monitor in order to create aneffective design .We all respond to certain arrangement of visualelements based on our cultural familiarity aswell as psychological and physiological effectsthat elements of design have . 19
  • Basic Visual Elementsindividual parts of a composition that can be characterized
  • Basic Visual Elementsindividual parts of a composition that can be characterizedLineShapeFormPositive negative spaceColorTexture
  • Basic Visual Principlesarrangement the basic elements using 21
  • Basic Visual Principlesarrangement the basic elements usingUnityBalanceRhythmProportionMovement 21
  • Lines1. Implied Lines2. Vertical Lines3. Horizontal Lines4. Diagonal Lines5. Curved Lines6. S Curves7. Leading Lines
  • Vertical linesVertical lines run up and down. They help stimulatefeelings of dignity, height, grandeur and strength. Youcan find vertical lines in buildings, trees, fences,people standing up etc.
  • Vertical linesVertical lines run up and down. They help stimulatefeelings of dignity, height, grandeur and strength. Youcan find vertical lines in buildings, trees, fences,people standing up etc.
  • Diagonal LinesThis line gives the sensation of Force, Energy andMotion as seen in trees bent by the wind, a runner atthe starting line or the slope of a mountain as it climbsinto the sky
  • Diagonal LinesThis line gives the sensation of Force, Energy andMotion as seen in trees bent by the wind, a runner atthe starting line or the slope of a mountain as it climbsinto the sky
  • Diagonal LinesThis line gives the sensation of Force, Energy andMotion as seen in trees bent by the wind, a runner atthe starting line or the slope of a mountain as it climbsinto the sky
  • Curved LinesHere is a line of great beauty and charm andsensual beautiful form with all its lines and curves.
  • Implied LinesImplied lines are not actual linesthat you are used to seeing.They are instead implied in thepicture area. They are made bythe way objects are placed withinthe 4 walls of your photograph.
  • Implied LinesImplied lines are not actual linesthat you are used to seeing.They are instead implied in thepicture area. They are made bythe way objects are placed withinthe 4 walls of your photograph.
  • Implied LinesImplied lines are not actual linesthat you are used to seeing.They are instead implied in thepicture area. They are made bythe way objects are placed withinthe 4 walls of your photograph.
  • ShapeShapes are the result of closed lines.However shapes can be visiblewithout lines when an artistestablishes a color area or anarrangement of objects within thecameras viewfinder.Some primary shapes include circles,squares, triangles and hexagons all ofwhich appear in nature in some formor another.Space is defined and determined byshapes and forms. Positive space iswhere shapes and forms exist;negative space is the empty spacearound shapes and forms. 27
  • Organic and geometric shapes Organic shapes present natural objects, fluidity and plasticity of objects, temporal and spiritual values.... Geometric shapes often represent man made structures, are more rigid, solid and stable, lasting values, calculated relationships, and logic, ..... 28
  • Form and volumeForm refers to the three-dimensional quality of an object, which is due in part tolight, and dark areas. When light from a single direction (e.g. our sun) hits anobject, part of the object is in shadow. Light and dark areas within an imageprovide contrast that can suggest volume.Factors that can affect our feelings towards an image include the direction ofthe light source, from above or below, and the gentleness or abruptness of thehalf tones. Light coming from behind a subject can form a silhouette resulting inobject that is completely black against a lighter colored background.
  • Positive and Negative SpacePositive space is where shapes and forms exist; negative spaceis the empty space around shapes and forms. In the photo belowthe black area is negative space and it serves to balance thearea in which the marmot and rock occupy. Areas of a picture thatcontain "nothing" are important visual elements that providebalance in an image. 30
  • COLORColor affects us emotionally. Colors have ability to evoke emotions through theircapacity to affect the human nervous system on physiological level. 31
  • ColorThe vocabulary of color includes:Hue: refers to the names of the primary colors, red, green and blue.Value: lightness and darkness of the color - the amount of white or black added.Intensity: the purity or saturation of the color Monochromatic color: use of one color where only the value of the color changes 32
  • Hue is a term used for a pure color red, green , yellow, ……Tint and shade is the intensity of the hue. Adding black or opposite color to a hue creates darker shade. Adding white to hue creates tint. 33
  • White light consist of mixture of all the visible colors (visible color spectrum) 34
  • The human eye peaks at sensitivity equal towavelengths of red, green and blue light.Mixing together red green and blue light willproduce white light. These are called additiveprimary colors. 35
  • Subtractive primaries are used with pigments anddyes: - magenta, cyan and yellow.Using these colors in color filter you can control(block) the amount of the opposite light that wouldpass through. 36
  • 3 primary colors TheseRed yellow colorand blue wheel applies to mixing pigments or solid colors. 37
  • 3 secondary colors Mixing equal amount of primary colors forms secondary colorsAlso known ascomplementarycolors 38
  • 6 tertiary colors 39
  • 12 step color wheel 40
  • Similarly as with light you can create emotional content with color.Cool tones Warm tones 41
  • Complementary color schemeColors that are opposite each otheron the color wheel are considered tobe complementary colors (example:red and green).The high contrast ofcomplementary colors creates avibrant look especially when used atfull saturation. This color schememust be managed well so it is notjarring. 42
  • Analogous color schemeAnalogous color schemes use colorsthat are next to each other on thecolor wheel. They usually match welland create serene and comfortabledesigns.Analogous color schemes are oftenfound in nature and are harmoniousand pleasing to the eye 43
  • Triadic color schemeA triadic color scheme uses colors that areevenly spaced around the color wheel.Triadic color schemes tend to be quitevibrant, even if you use pale or unsaturatedversions of your hues.To use a triadic harmony successfully, thecolors should be carefully balanced - let onecolor dominate and use the two others foraccent 44
  • Rectangle (tetradic) color schemeThe rectangle or tetradic color schemeuses four colors arranged into twocomplementary pairs.This rich color scheme offers plenty ofpossibilities for variation.Tetradic color schemes works best if youlet one color be dominant.You should also pay attention to thebalance between warm and cool colors inyour design 45
  • TextureTexture refers to the surface quality or "feel" of an object - smooth, rough,soft, etc. Textures may be actual (felt with touch - tactile) or implied(suggested by the way an artist has created the work of art -visual). Textureis often emphasized in oblique lighting as it strikes the objects from oneside.actual vs. implied textures 46
  • Visual Attraction of design elementsVarious visual element attract our attention. As image makers youshould be aware how these elements effect perception of image.For example our eyes tend to search in images and go first toelemets such us: Converging lines High contras values Centered or large size objects Faces or human elements Dramatic or disturbing subjectsStrategically using these elements you can improve your composition.
  • Visual PrinciplesThe use of design principles applied to the visualelements is like visual grammar. Visual principles arecreated by combining elements such as line, shape,value, texture, form, color and space. The elements arethe building blocks that go together to produce visualprinciples such as harmony, variety, balance,movement, emphasis, proportion and rhythm. 48
  • Visual Principlesarrangement the basic elements usingprinciples of:UnityBalanceRhythmProportionVarietyHarmonyMovement 49
  • Unity - harmonyUnity refers to an ordering of all elements in animage so that each contributes to a unifiedaesthetic effect so that the image is seen as awhole. Failing to accomplish this results in thepremature termination of the viewersexperience - they look away. There are anumber of ways to achieve unity to attract andkeep the viewers attention. Balance Contrast Emphasis Proportion 50
  • BalanceBalance implies that the visual elements within the frame have a sense of weight.Large objects generally weigh more than small objects and dark objects weigh morethan light colored objects. The position of the elements is also critical. Weunconsciously assume the center of a picture corresponds to a fulcrum. A heavyweight on one side can be balanced by a lighter weight on the other side if the lighterweight is located at a greater distance from the fulcrum. 51
  • Balance symmetrical asymmetrical radial 52
  • Rhythm -RepetitionRhythm refers to the regular repeating occurrenceof elements in the scene just as in music it refers tothe regular occurrence of certain musical notesover time.Rhythm is soothing and our eyes beg to followrhythmic patterns. To be effective, rhythm alsorequires some variability - rhythm that is too similaror perfect may be boring.Therefore when composing your images look forrepetition with variation. For instance if you arephotographing a fence - one that is perfect will nothold a viewers interest for long, but one in whichsome of the posts are bent, broken, larger orsmaller will generate more viewer interest. 53
  • ProportionProportion refers to the relative size and scale of the variouselements in a design.Proportion is often discussed in terms of the context or standardused as a relationship to human form. Often referred to as the Canon of Proportion or Proportions of Man, da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man can be found in Venice, Italy in the Gallerie dell Accademia. 54
  • ProportionProportion refers the size relationship of visual elements to each other and to thewhole picture.It is the relationship between objects, or parts, of a whole.One of the reasons proportion is often considered important in composition is thatviewers respond to it emotionally. Proportion in art has been examined forhundreds of years.One proportion that is often cited as occurring frequently in design is the Goldenmean or Golden ratio. 55
  • Golden Ratio and Rule of Thirds Golden Ratio: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34 etc. Each succeeding number after 1 is equal to the sum of the two preceding numbers. The Ratio formed 1:1.618 is called the golden mean - the ratio of bc to ab is the same as ab to ac. If you divide each smaller window again with the same ratio and joing their corners you end up with a logarithmic spiral. This spiral is a motif found frequently throughout nature in shells, horns and flowers (and my Science & Art logo).The Golden Mean or Phi occurs frequently in natureand it may be that humans are geneticallyprogrammed to recognize the ratio as being pleasing. Studies of top fashion models revealed that their faces have an abundance of the 1.618ratio. 56