Aquent/AMA Webcast: Healthcare Social Media: The Conversation That Is Defining Your Brand

  • 3,048 views
Uploaded on

Active healthcare social media discussions cover all aspects of healthcare, from a full range of disease states to specific treatment strategies. These conversations can shape consumers’ view of your …

Active healthcare social media discussions cover all aspects of healthcare, from a full range of disease states to specific treatment strategies. These conversations can shape consumers’ view of your brand – and pharmaceutical companies are sometimes the only voice absent from the conversation. Within online discussion, which healthcare topics drive the conversation? Who is talking? How much of the discussion is about therapeutic areas – and how much is brand-specific? What do patients and caregivers share in this environment? What can we learn by using social media as a market research input? Find out more in this webcast presented by Melissa Davies, Strategic Account Director, Healthcare of NM Incite (A Nielsen/McKinsey Company).

More in: Business , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
3,048
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
218
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Aquent's marketing practice helps some of the world's biggest brands find talented marketing contractors to achieve their goals. Talk to Aquent about how you can utilize contractors for specialized skills or to tackle fast approaching deadlines.  Visit aquent.com to learn more.

Transcript

  • 1. Healthcare Social Media: The Conversation That Is Defining Your Brand Key takeaways of this webcast presented by Melissa Davies, Strategic Account Director, Healthcare of NM Incite (A Nielsen/McKinsey Company) will include... > Demographics of social media – is Grandma participating online? > Who is driving the discussion – patients, caregivers, others? > Which disease categories are most actively discussed online? > What kinds of questions can we answer through social media research? > How can social media research complement traditional research methods? > How can we use social media research to derive key brand insights? > What happens online when a brand is in crisis?  
  • 2. AMA Webcast: Healthcare Social Media – The Conversation that is Defining your Brand Presenters: Melissa Davies, Strategic Accounts Director, Healthcare, NMIncite Anna Carbonara, Moderator, American Marketing Association Sponsored by: The audio portion of today’s presentation is available via broadcast audio. You can also dial in to hear audio: Participants (US & Canada, Toll Free): 800.945.9434 Participants (International): +1 212.231.2907
  • 3. Register on the AMA Website
  • 4. Housekeeping Items Recording A recording of this presentation will be sent to you within a couple of days Slides A link to the slides will be sent to you within a couple of days Twitter Please reference hash tag: #AMAAquentHCSM , when tweeting about this webinar
  • 5.  
  • 6. Healthcare Social Media The Conversation That Is Defining Your Brand Melissa Davies Strategic Accounts Director, Healthcare April 20, 2011
  • 7. Introducing NM Incite Trusted data provider, leveraging proprietary technology and buzz sources from 160+ million social media sites – across Twitter, Facebook, blogs, message boards, and customer reviews Global reach, in 18 countries (and growing) Access to Nielsen’s proprietary consumer panels for online, TV, and retail purchases Benchmarks and insights from over 150 clients, especially in health care, CPG, retail, auto, CE, Financial services Market leader in enterprise social media monitoring/ analytics (Source: Forrester) Industry-leading expertise in digital marketing, product development, and service operations Capability-building initiatives to enable incorporation of social media into core organizational processes Functional expertise in translating social media metrics and insights into action and sustained improvement
  • 8. SOCIAL MEDIA AND HEALTH
    • Getting Started
  • 9. Defining the social media landscape
      • Register for communities to discuss specific topics, seek advice / discuss mutual interests
      • Connect with friends / individuals to play and discuss popular games in the online space
      • Upload, share and comment on photos, videos and audio to facilitate mass distribution of rich media
      • Sign up for a personal feed to broadcast activities and receive real-time updates (e.g., news, friends, celebrities)
      • Create personal profiles to facilitate keeping in touch , meeting new people , and sharing key interests
      • Evaluate and rate products and services based on personal experience
      • Create individual blog to discuss opinions , and experiences based on daily life
  • 10. Social media outpaces all other online activities SOURCE: Nielsen NetView, June 2010 *Other refers to 74 remaining online categories visited from PC/laptops. **NetView’s Video/Movies category refers to time spent on video-specific (e.g., YouTube, Bing Videos, Hulu) and movie-related websites (e.g., IMDB, MSN Movies and Netflix) only. It is not a measure of video streaming or inclusive of video streaming on non-video-specific or movie-specific websites (e.g., streamed video on sports or news sites).
  • 11. Even Grandma is on Facebook SOURCE: Pew Research Center Social networking use among internet users ages 50 and older has nearly doubled – from 22% to 42% over the past year % of Adult Internet Users Who Use Social Networking Sites
  • 12. Online health-seeking continues to grow SOURCE: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project surveys, 2008-2010 Eight in ten internet users look online for health information, making it the third most popular online activity among all those included in the Pew Internet Project’s surveys. Activity Millennials Ages 18-34 Gen X Ages 35-46 Younger Boomers Ages 57-65 Older Boomers Ages 57-65 Silent Generation Ages 66-74 GI Generation Ages 75+ All Online Adults Ages 18+ Go Online 95% 86% 81% 76% 58% 30% 79% E-mail 96% 94% 91% 93% 90% 88% 94% Use search engine 92% 87% 86% 87% 82% 72% 87% Look for health information 78% 84% 80% 83% 73% 69% 80% Get news 76% 79% 76% 76% 67% 54% 75% Buy a product 68% 66% 64% 69% 59% 57% 66%
  • 13. Where do today’s consumers get health information?
  • 14.  
  • 15. “ Cyberchondriacs” on the rise SOURCE: The Harris Poll, Harris Interactive 81% of all Cyberchondriacs have looked for health information online in the last month 17% have gone online to look for health information 10 or more times in the last month 86% were satisfied with their ability to find the information they want online 85% believe the information they found is reliable
  • 16. MOBILE IS CHANGING INTERNET USE
    • Trend to Watch
  • 17. Explosion of mobile is well documented Mobile phones will overtake PCs by 2015 SOURCES: Nielsen, Nielsen Mobile A typical U.S. mobile subscriber sends and receives 175% more text messages than voice calls 14% of mobile subscribers have downloaded an app in the last 30 days
  • 18. Mobile internet use is increasing % of all adult cell owners who do the following on their phones (2010) One-year change in use of cell phones to access the Internet: +52% SOURCE: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, 2010
  • 19. Who is more likely to use the mobile web? Younger Groups (no surprise) Minorities SOURCE: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, 2010
  • 20. Who is more likely to use the mobile web? Younger Groups (no surprise) Minorities SOURCE: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, 2010
  • 21. Mobile increases web, social utilization Facebook Mobile Users People who use Facebook on their mobile devices are twice as active on Facebook as non-mobile users SOURCES: Facebook.com, AllFacebook.com, InsideFacebook.com
  • 22. Four lessons from healthcare social media
  • 23. WHICH CONDITIONS DRIVE MOST ACTIVE ONLINE DISCUSSION?
    • Lesson 1
  • 24. Discussion volume by condition
  • 25. Breast Cancer Alzheimer’s Disease Bipolar Disorder Arthritis Depression Cardiovascular Disease Hypertension Fibromyalgia ADHD COPD Key: Cardiovascular Chronic Condition Mental Health Oncology Pain Type 2 Diabetes Ulcerative Colitis Multiple Sclerosis Type 1 Diabetes Cystic Fibrosis Schizophrenia Colorectal Cancer Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Brain Cancer Ovarian Cancer Gout Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • 26. Two cancers, different discussion SOURCES: Cancer prevalence data: US National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER), 2007. Buzz is measured across NM Incite’s Healthcare dataset, 1/1/2010-12/31/2010. 2,605,000
  • 27. Two cancers, different discussion SOURCES: Cancer prevalence data: US National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER), 2007. Buzz is measured across NM Incite’s Healthcare dataset, 1/1/2010-12/31/2010.
    • Breast Cancer
    • Discussion feels hopeful: “no longer a death sentence”
    • Highly patient-driven
    • Highly engaged
    Ratio of Messages: Prevalence 0.26 2,605,000
  • 28. Two cancers, different discussion SOURCES: Cancer prevalence data: US National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER), 2007. Buzz is measured across NM Incite’s Healthcare dataset, 1/1/2010-12/31/2010.
    • Breast Cancer
    • Discussion feels hopeful: “no longer a death sentence”
    • Highly patient-driven
    • Highly engaged
    • Brain Cancer
    • High level of fear and frustration
    • Caregivers are more active
    • Very highly engaged
    Ratio of Messages: Prevalence 0.26 Ratio of Messages: Prevalence 0.51 2,605,000
  • 29. Oncology: buzz vs. prevalence 671,507 messages Breast Cancer Ratio of Messages:Prevalence Discussion Volume SOURCES: Cancer prevalence data: US National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER), 2007. Buzz is measured across NM Incite’s Healthcare dataset, 1/1/2010-12/31/2010. 56,508 messages Colorectal Cancer 18,024 messages Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma 10,205 messages Hodgkin’s Lymphoma 63,649 messages Brain Cancer 31,710 messages Ovarian Cancer
  • 30. Mental health: buzz vs. prevalence Ratio of Messages:Prevalence 497,442 messages 208,892 messages 414,813 messages 191,499 messages Alzheimer’s Disease Bipolar Disorder ADHD Depression Schizophrenia Discussion Volume SOURCES: Prevalence data: Alzheimer’s Association, National Health Interview Survey 2009, National Institutes of Mental Health. Buzz is measured across NM Incite’s Healthcare dataset, 1/1/2010-12/31/2010. 73,069 messages
  • 31. Chronic: buzz vs. prevalence Multiple Sclerosis Cystic Fibrosis Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes COPD Discussion Volume Ratio of Messages:Prevalence SOURCES: Prevalence data: NIAID, NWHIC, Cleveland Clinic, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation . Buzz is measured across NM Incite’s Healthcare dataset, 1/1/2010-12/31/2010. 2.845 45,419 messages 117,376 messages 66,772 messages 56,203 messages 85,346 messages
  • 32. Sampling the conversation Breast Cancer “ I can related to the emotions impact of breast cancer  you are feeling , I was shocked, scared, angry, overwhelmed , crushed , hopeless, when the doctors informed me … in order for me to survive this I had to take life with cancer one day at a time , surrounded myself with family, friends , prayer and faith . … you are not along in this fight , I will keep you and your family in my prayers.” National Breast Cancer Foundation Forums, 2011-01-29
  • 33. Sampling the conversation Breast Cancer “ I can related to the emotions impact of breast cancer  you are feeling , I was shocked, scared, angry, overwhelmed , crushed , hopeless, when the doctors informed me … in order for me to survive this I had to take life with cancer one day at a time , surrounded myself with family, friends , prayer and faith . … you are not along in this fight , I will keep you and your family in my prayers.” National Breast Cancer Foundation Forums, 2011-01-29 Brain Cancer “ Brain cancer is so awful. My mom is still in treatment, she has about 10 more avastin treatments left. She is 72, somewhat weak, hardly talks because she can't think of the right word to say and does nothing but sit in a chair all day and look out the window. I wonder what will happen once treatment ends , will she get any better or can we expect more of the same for the rest of her life.” CancerCompass.com, 2011-01-13
  • 34. Implications
    • How active/important is social media for my therapeutic area?
      • Online advertising spend
      • Market research approach
      • Social media engagement (branded/unbranded)
  • 35. WHAT INFORMATION IS SHARED ONLINE?
    • Lesson 2
  • 36. Discussion is broad-ranging Brand-specific discussion ~20% Emotional support Doctor-patient interaction Personal Experience Management strategies Treatment options Symptoms
  • 37. Buzz snapshot: type 2 diabetes Source: NM Incite analysis of Type 2 Diabetes discussion 1/2011. Word cloud image created using Wordle.net
  • 38. Online currency: personal experience "My own personal experiance has been good. I started Onglyza in late January and I still inject Lantus daily 23-25 units and take one 5mg Onglyza. For the first few months I was able to cut the Novalog to an occasional correction and for the last month or so haven't even needed to do that. My BG average since starting is 109 with 98% of my numbers ranging 151-67. For the last 5 weeks my average has dropped to 101 with most readings falling between 70 and 130. 8 months ago my A1c was over 10, late January it was 8. 6, my next A1c is in early August and I expect to see somewhere around 5. 5." Tudiabetes.org, 2010-06-05 Treatment regimen, dosage Personal experience Monitoring health “by the numbers”
  • 39. Positive and negative are shared "I want to go off the met. . . tummy issues and have been on it since November 2 x 5oo mg xr 2 x a day. . thats a lot of met plus the onglyza which does nothing as far as I can tell. Still need to lose about another 20 lbs. . . am 5'2'' and 148 lbs. Loved the effects of the victoza on weight but not the constant nausea. Had been on duetact for a while. . but kept going hypo. Then Glymepiride. . made me hungry as all get out. Sheesh. . . . am so sick and tired of the whole thing!!!!" Diabetesforum.com, 2010-05-21 Side effects Lack of efficacy General frustration with treatment history
  • 40. Internet as second opinion "My Dr. just prescribed onglyza. I did a text search of the group but haven't seen it mentioned. Does anybody have any knowledge on this newly approved drug?" Yahoo! Groups: type-2-diabetes, 2010-01-30 Looking for more information Caregiver involvement Treatment combination "Onglyza Is anyone taking this? Hubby was prescribed it today and I see that it hasn't been out very long. Does anyone know anything about it?" Diabetesforums.com, 2010-02-26 "Has anyone heard anything about onglyza? I saw a commercial for it yesterday and was wondering if it could be used with Byetta?" Yahoo! Groups: diabetes_and_byetta, 2010-06-07
  • 41. Implications
    • What is patient lexicon surrounding this condition?
      • Language that will best connect with patients
      • Marketing
      • Patient/physician education materials
    • How do patients feel about my brand?
      • Understand frustrations, challenges, needs
    • Do we need to do a better job of setting patient expectations?
      • Patient education materials
      • Package insert, branded collateral
      • Physician communication
  • 42. WHO TAKES PART IN THE DISCUSSION?
    • Lesson 3
  • 43. Patients drive online discussion Share of Discussion Contributed by Patient/Caregiver/HCP, by Condition SOURCE: NM Incite analysis; speaker demographics are qualitatively assessed.
  • 44. Implications
    • Who can we hear through social media channels?
      • Market research approach
    • Who can we reach through social media channels? How should we tailor the message to the audience?
      • Marketing spend allocation
      • Planning for online engagement
  • 45. WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A BRAND IS IN CRISIS?
    • Lesson 4
  • 46. Brand crises drive buzz Trended Buzz for JNJ and Recall (Weekly)
  • 47. Brand crises drive buzz Trended Buzz for JNJ and Recall (Weekly) Children’s Tylenol, Sept. 24, 2009 Tylenol Arthritis, Nov./Dec. 2009 McNeil, Jan. 2010 Zyrtec, Motrin &Tylenol, March 2010 Infant & Children's Products, April 30, 2010 Tylenol, Benadryl, June 15, 2010 Tylenol, Benadryl & Motrin, July 8, 2010 Tylenol 8 Hour, Oct. 18, 2010 Children's Benadryl, Motrin, Rolaids, Nov. 2010 Rolaids Softchews, Dec. 9, 2010 Tylenol and other products, January 14, 2011
  • 48. Narrow window to act Close-up View: Trended Buzz for JNJ+Recall (Daily) Infant & Children's Products Recall, April 30 One-day change in buzz: +1740%
  • 49. Narrow window to act Close-up View: Trended Buzz for JNJ+Recall (Daily) Infant & Children's Products Recall, April 30 One-day change in buzz: +1740%
    • What are they saying?
    • Day 1: Sharing the news
    • Day 3: Deeper dive: Which brands are recalled, why, what parents should do
    • Day 6: Congressional panel investigates recall
  • 50. What do consumers share? “ Get generic or go with a different brand (PediaCare Fever/acetaminophen or Infant Advil/Ibuprofen). … The FDA report on the only factory that makes infant Tylenol/Motrin is absolutely DISGUSTING- so many horrible violations, gram negative bacteria in ingredients used in lots of medications for BABIES! Don't expect to see "safe" Tylenol or Motrin on shelves for a looong time. I will never, EVER support that company again, if I can avoid it- and I can certainly avoid supporting them through these meds, as there are non-McNeil generics and brand names available.” TheBump.com, 2010-05-07 Frustration with the company
  • 51. What do consumers share? “ Friday Freakout: Tylenocalypse Edition We left town early, and so we at least saved our own weekend from the gigantic )#($%ing freakout that is the massive recall of liquid infant's and children's Tylenol, Motrin, Zyrtec, and Benadryl products issued Saturday. Wait, Saturday? What the hell kind of government agency issues a sweeping recall of some of the most popular children's medicines on a Saturday? … That would be the FDA. This is not the first time the FDA has had ineffective, hard-to-follow recall announcements; I hope someone's trying to fix that place.” DaddyTypes.com, 2010-05-03 Frustration with the recall process
  • 52. Implications
    • How quickly does crisis news spread among consumers?
    • What are patients and caregivers saying about the event? What information sources are they sharing?
    • How does consumer opinion about the brand change as a result?
  • 53. Questions? Thank you!
    • Melissa Davies
    • Strategic Accounts Director, Healthcare
    • [email_address]
    • @MelissaKDavies
  • 54. Thank You for your Participation!
    • Additional Questions?
    • Contact Melissa at: [email_address]
    • General AMA Questions can be sent to: alibb@ama.org
    • Recording
    • A link to the recording of this presentation will be sent within a few days
    • Slides
    • A link to the slides will be sent to you within a few days
    • Twitter
    • Please reference hash tag: #AMAAquentHCSM , when tweeting about this webinar
    • Today’s Presentation was brought to you by the ReadyTalk Web Conferencing
    • Platform. If you are interested in learning more about ReadyTalk and their
    • services, please visit www.ReadyTalk.com/AMA