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Southside Rotary Training Presentation

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  • 1. Rotary Club of Southside Tulsa Fireside Chat “ Where you can catch that Southside Spirit”
  • 2. Fireside Chat Training
    • Rotary International History and Facts
    • Tulsa Southside History
    • Rotary International Programs
    • The Rotary Foundation
    • The Southside Rotary Foundation
    • You and Rotary
  • 3. The History of Rotary
    • 1905 – Chicago Attorney Paul Harris organizes first Rotary Meeting on February 23,leading to the formation of the Rotary Club of Chicago
    • 1907 – Rotary Club of Chicago helps to organize installation of public toilets, one of the firsts acts of community service.
    • 1910-11 – Clubs formed in Canada, Great Britain, and Ireland; organization changes name to International Associations of Rotary Clubs
  • 4. The History of Rotary
    • 1915-16 – Club chartered in Cuba, the first non-English speaking Rotary Club
    • 1916-17 – President Arch Klumph proposes establishing an endowment fund, precursor of The Rotary Foundation
    • 1942-43 – Rotary conference in London on education and cultural exchange sets stage for UNESCO
  • 5. The History of Rotary
    • 1946-47 - Founder Paul Harris dies in Chicago; outpouring of funds from Rotarians used to establish fellowship program.
    • 1948-49 – First 18 Rotary Fellows study abroad, a precursor of Ambassadorial Scholarships
    • 1962-63 – First Interact club formed in Melbourne, Florida USA. World Community Service program launched
  • 6. The History of Rotary
    • 1979-80 - Foundation grant to immunize 6 million Philippine children against polio sets stage for Polio Plus
    • 1965–66 – Special Grants (now Matching Grants) and Group Study Exchange programs begin
    • 1967–68 - First Rotaract club formed in Charlotte, North Carolina, USA.
  • 7. The History of Rotary
    • 1978–79 - Health, Hunger and Humanity (3-H) Grants begin
    • 1984-85 - Rotary launches PolioPlus program and campaigns to raise US $ 120 million to immunize all the children of the world
    • 1987-88 Through the PolioPlus program and campaign, Rotarians raise US$247 million. First Women join Rotary.
    • 1988-89 – Rotary returns to Hungary and Poland
  • 8. The History of Rotary
    • 1994–95 – Western Hemisphere declared polio-free
    • 1998–99 - Rotary Centers for International Studies in peace and conflict resolution established
    • 2000–01 – Western Pacific region declared polio free
    • 2001–02 - Europe declared polio-free
    • 2002–03 - Rotary launches a second polio eradication fundraising campaign to help fill a critical funding need. Rotarians raise over US$ 129 million.
  • 9. The History of Rotary
    • 2004–05 - Clubs celebrate Rotary’s centennial by launching hundreds of community projects and contributing thousands of volunteer hours
    • 2005–06 - Polio reduced to four countries: Afghanistan, India, Nigeria and Pakistan. Polio cases have dropped by 99 percent since 1985.
  • 10. The History of Rotary
    • 2006–07 - The Rotary Foundation recognizes the millionth Paul Harris Fellow.
    • 2007–08 - Rotary receives US$100 million grant from the Gates Foundation to help eradicate polio.
    • 2008–09 - Rotary receives US$255 million grant for polio eradication from the Gates Foundation
  • 11. Rotary by the Numbers
    • Rotary Club 2496
      • Keith James President
      • 57 Members
      • 15 Tulsa Area Clubs
    • District 6110
      • A.C. Moncreif District Governor
      • 80 Clubs
      • 5500 Members
      • NW. Arkansas, SW Missouri, SE Kansas, NE Oklahoma
    • Zone 31
      • 14 Districts
      • 689 Clubs
      • 35,253 Members
  • 12.  
  • 13. Rotary International (RI)
    • 1.2 Million Members
    • 33,000 Clubs
      • 200 Countries
    • 531 Districts
    • 34 International Zones
    • John Kenney RI President (Scotland)
    • Ray Klingensmith President-Elect (Kirksville, MO)
  • 14. Rotary Motto
    • “ Service Above Self”
  • 15. The Object Of Rotary
    • The Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise and, in particular to encourage and foster:
    • The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service
    • High ethical standards in business and professions; the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations: and the dignifying of each Rotarian’s occupation as an opportunity to serve society
    • The application of the ideal of service in each Rotarians Personal, business, and community life.
    • The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a work fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service!
  • 16. The 4 Avenues of Service
    • Club Service-
      • Club Service focuses on strengthening fellowship and ensuring the smooth functioning of Rotary clubs.
    • Vocational Service -
      • Vocational Service involves club members serving others through their professions and aspiring to high ethical standards. Rotarians, as business leaders, share skills and expertise through their vocations, and they inspire others in the process.
    • Community Service -
      • Community Service is the opportunity  Rotary clubs have to implement club projects and activities that improve life in the local community.
    • International Service -
      • International Service encompasses efforts to expand Rotary’s humanitarian reach around the world and to promote world understanding and peace. It includes everything from contributing to Polio Plus to helping Rotary Youth Exchange students adjust to their host countries.
  • 17. Rotary 4 Way Test
    • Is it the Truth
    • Is it fair to all concerned
    • Will it build good will and better friendships
    • Will it be beneficial to all concerned
  • 18. Rotary Club of Southside Tulsa History
  • 19. The Rotary Club of Southside Tulsa
    • Chartered May 26, 1958
    • Banquet May 16,1958
    • Charter Members -35
      • Harold Lamprich Last Charter member
    • Meeting Place – Fellowship Congregational Church – 29 th & Harvard
  • 20. 1958
    • European Economic Community established
    • Khrushchev & de Gaulle elected premiers
    • 50 th Anniversary of the Peace sign – originated in Britain
    • Lego brick introduced by Ole Kirk Christianson
    • Stamps cost - 3 cents
    • Little Rock Schools ordered to integrate
    • Baltimore Colts (Johnny Unitas) defeated the New York Giants (Alan Ameche) in the first sudden death game
  • 21. Club Accomplishments
    • Bolivian Water Well
    • Citizens Crime Commission
    • Alert Neighbors
    • Uganda Projects
      • Orphan Education
      • Sewing Shop
    • Diabetic Day Camp
    • Score
    • Salivation Army Rehabilitation Center
    • Up With Trees
    • Be-Wise Immunize
    • Dictionary Project
    • Southside Rotary Foundation
    • Rotary Olympics
    • Adopt-a-School Springdale
    • Three other Rotary Clubs
      • Southeast
      • Southwest
      • Sunrise South
    • Biscuit Acres Dog Park
    • Langenheim Park Playscape - Murrah Children’s Memorial
  • 22. Projects and Fundraisers
    • First Fundraiser - $ 1400
    • White Elephant Sale Brookside Plaza
    • 64-65 SS produced 12 30 minute television projects on ethics and 4 Way Test
    • 67-68 Score started
    • 69-70 Sunrise started
    • 75-76 Chariots for Charity
    • 81-82 Travis Freeman District Governor
    • 82-83 Co-sponsored Sunrise South
    • 84-85 Let’s Drive with Courtesy & Spirit Tulsa
    • 85-86 1 st Rotary Olympics
    • 86-87 Supreme Court rules that clubs refuse membership to women
    • 88-89 Created Be-Wise Immunize
  • 23. Projects and Fundraisers Continued
    • 90-91 Bruce Washburn serves as 2 nd term President
    • 91-92 Bolivian Water Well completed
    • 93-94 Oil Well Restoration Riverparks
    • 94-95 First American Duck Race
    • 95-96 1 st Black Tie and Bolo Dinner
    • 97-98 Murrah Children’s Memorial Playscape in Langenheim Park
    • 00-01 Don Wasson District Governor
      • No Dinner Dinner Fundraiser
    • 01-02 Handed out 65 dictionaries at Springdale
    • 02-03 TPS Wide distribution of dictionaries
    • 03-04 World of Words becomes district 6110 project
    • 06-07 Women members admitted
    • 07-08 Nigerian School Project
    • 08-09 Biscuit Acres Dog Park
  • 24. Notable Members and Former Members
    • Cliff Taulbert –Author/Speaker
    • Larry Wingate – Speaker/Author
    • Travis Freeman – District Governor
    • Don Wasson District governor (Sunrise)
    • Steve Glenn – Assistant District Governor
    • Glenn Burnett – Assistant District Governor
    • Stan Dixon –
    • Bill Crews –
    • First Women members
      • Dolly Dixon
      • Teresa Wixson
    • First Paul Harris Fellows
      • Charlie Wynkoop
      • Bob Curnutt
    • Rotary Men of Note
      • Glenn Burnett
      • Larry Gilbert
      • Harold Lamprich (recently retired)
    • District Treasurer
      • Russell Robinson
  • 25. Honorary Members
    • Deane Van Trease
    • Jim Inhofe
    • Ron Palmer
    • Steve Stephenson
  • 26. Prominent Speakers
    • Frank Abagnale
    • Barry Switzer
    • Eddie Chiles
    • Henry Bellmon
    • Bobby “The Owl” Baldwin
    • Christian Bernard
    • Madeline Manning
    • Joe Granville
    • Bill Doughty
    • Numerous Congressmen, Senators and Governors
  • 27. Club Awards
    • Blaine Roy Gardner Vocational Service Award –
      • Presented to the person who best exemplifies the ideals Rotary through his vocation
    • Bill Crews Community Service Award –
      • Presented to the person who exemplifies Rotary with their contribution to the community.
  • 28. Rotary International Programs
  • 29. About Rotary Programs
    • Rotary International offers a broad range of humanitarian, intercultural, and educational programs and activities designed to advance the organization's ultimate goal of world understanding and peace.
    • These Programs help clubs and districts achieve their service goals in their own communities and in communities abroad, fostering fellowship and goodwill in the process.
  • 30. The Programs
      • Interact
      • Rotaract
      • Rotarian Action Groups
      • Rotary Community Corps
      • Rotary Fellowships
      • Rotary Friendship Exchange
      • Rotary Volunteers
      • Rotary Youth Leadership Awards
      • World Community Service
      • Youth Exchange
  • 31. Interact
    • Interact is a service club for young people ages 14-18. Sponsored by local Rotary clubs, Interact clubs give young people an opportunity to participate in fun, meaningful service projects while developing leadership skills and meeting new friends.
  • 32. Rotaract
    • Rotaract is a service club for young people ages 18 to 30. Sponsored by local Rotary clubs, Rotaract clubs conduct community and international service projects, and participate in professional and leadership development activities.
  • 33. Rotarian Action Groups
    • Rotarian Action Groups conduct international service projects that further the Object of Rotary. Individual Rotarian may join these groups to support a particular type of service activity.
  • 34. Rotary Community Corps
    • A Rotary Community Corps (RCC) is a group of non-Rotarian men and women who share Rotarians' commitment to service. Under the guidance of a sponsoring Rotary club, RCC members put their own skills to work to improve the quality of life in their communities.
  • 35. Rotary Fellowships
    • Rotary Fellowships are groups of Rotarians organized by recreational or vocational interests. Rotary Fellowships unite Rotarians in friendship and service, the exchange of ideas, and the pursuit of international understanding.
  • 36. Rotary Friendship Exchange
    • Rotary Friendship Exchange provides Rotarians the opportunity to experience other cultures by staying in the homes of Rotarians in other countries. The program advances international understanding and peace through personal contact across borders while developing interclub relationships.
  • 37. Rotary Volunteers
    • The Rotary Volunteers program increases Rotarian participation in volunteer activities by providing service opportunities in a volunteer’s local community and communities abroad. At the international level, two directories are available to match registered Rotary Volunteers with service projects.
  • 38. Rotary Youth Leadership Awards
    • In the Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) program, young people ages 14-30, chosen for their leadership potential, attend a seminar, camp, or workshop to discuss and practice leadership skills. Rotary clubs and districts select participants and organize the event.
  • 39. World Community Service
    • Through the World Community Service program, Rotarians conduct community service projects to meet human needs and improve lives. Clubs in need of help to complete a project partner with a club abroad willing to provide funds, materials, and technical and professional assistance.
  • 40. Youth Exchange
    • Youth Exchange is an international exchange program that provides thousands of young people with the opportunity to meet people from other lands and to experience their cultures, beginning a lifetime of international understanding.
  • 41. The Rotary Foundation
  • 42. The Rotary Foundation
    • The Rotary Foundation of RI is a not-for-profit corporation whose mission is to enable Rotarians to advance world understanding, goodwill, and peace through the improvement of health, the support of education, and the alleviation of poverty.
    • Financial Support
      • 2005-06 Contributions $ 119,000,000.
      • Spent $ 108,000,000 in support of humanitarian and educational programs implemented by clubs and districts.
    • Contributions go to one of three main funds
      • Annual Program Fund – provides grants and awards through Foundation programs
      • Permanent Fund – endowment from which only a portion of the earnings are spent in support of Foundation programs, ensuring the long-term viability of the Foundation
      • PolioPlus Fund – which supports Rotary’s dream of a polio-free world
    • Every Rotarian Every Year supports vital Foundation programs
  • 43. Polio Plus
    • The PolioPlus program provides funding for vaccine and transportation for mass immunization campaigns as well as support for social mobilization, surveillance, and laboratories to help carry out the final stages of global polio eradication. Rotarians have raised funds that will amount to more than $ 650 million in support and provided hundreds of thousands of volunteer hours.
    • Partners
      • UNICEF
      • US. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      • World Health Organization
    • Results
      • Rotarians have Raised more than $ 650 million
      • Two Billion under 5 have received vaccinations
      • Five million people who might otherwise be paralyzed are walking today
      • 5000,000 new cases of Polio are prevented each year
      • The number of cases reduced by 99%
      • Down to four countries in the word
  • 44. Educational Programs
    • Ambassadorial Scholarships –
      • 800 students per year serve as ambassadors overseas
    • Rotary World Peace fellowships-
      • awarded to individuals for study in master’s degree programs an Rotary Centers for International Studies in peace and conflict resolution.
    • Rotary Peace and Conflict Studies Fellowships –
      • Awarded to individuals for study in a short-term certificate program at the Rotary Center for Peace and Conflict Studies in Thailand
    • Group Study Exchange –
      • A short term cultural and vocational exchange program between districts in different countries for non-Rotarian professionals ages 25-40
    • Rotary Grants for University Teachers
      • Awarded to higher education faculty to teach abroad in academic field of practical use to people in low-income countries
  • 45. Humanitarian Grant Programs
    • Humanitarian grants enable Rotarians to increase their support of international service projects that provide water wells, medical care, literacy classes, and other essentials to people in need.
    • Matching Grants –
      • Assist Rotary clubs and districts in carrying out humanitarian projects with clubs in other countries
    • District Simplified Grants –
      • Enable districts to support service activities or humanitarian endeavors that benefit local or international communities
    • Volunteer Service Grants
      • Support the travel of qualified Rotarians and their spouses as they plan needed projects or provide essential services in a community.
    • Health, Hunger and Humanity (3_H) Grants
      • Fund long-term, self-help, and grassroots development projects that use a sustainable, integrative approach to address humanitarian needs.
  • 46. The Southside Rotary Foundation (SSRF)
  • 47. The Southside Foundation
    • SSRF
    • Not For profit corporation – 501c3
    • Current Assets - $ 200,000 plus
    • Must spend 5% of the corpus annually
    • Sources of Funds
      • Interest of investments
      • Donations from members when they have birthdays and anniversaries
      • Profitable Southside Rotary Club Projects
  • 48. Procedure for Grants
    • Submit a written request to the SS Rotary Club Board
    • The grant is reviewed at the board meeting
    • Approved project are sent to SSRF for funding
    • Requests not approved are passed to the SSFR board for review.
  • 49. The SSRF Board
    • 5 members – usually former presidents
      • Robert Reins – President
      • Lynn Fesperman – Tom Sawyer
      • Russell Robinson – Treasurer
      • Ben Estes – Director
      • Tom Sawyer
    • Term 5 years
    • Meet Quarterly
    • Report to Club twice a year
  • 50. SSRF Grant Guidelines
    • Donations we give have to have a “face”
    • Donations are not made to ministries
    • It is preferable that the grants are for local entities
    • The request should be project specific
    • Grant requests should be non-profits or charitable organizations
  • 51. SSRF Donations
    • Meals on Wheels
    • Down payment for a truck for EIA
    • Bolivian Water Well
    • Crosstown Learning Center
    • DVIS
    • Springdale Elementary School
    • Too many to name
  • 52. You and Rotary
  • 53. New Member Expectations
    • Accept Rotarian of the Day (ROD) assignments
    • Provide information about your self and the speaker to the bulletin editor 2 weeks before bulletin is posted on the web site
    • Lead in Prayer and Pledge when asked – you assign these when you are ROD
    • Door greeter when “Red Badger”
    • Accept and perform assigned positions in club and on Board of Directors
  • 54. Rotary Resources – Club Level
    • President
    • Your Proposer
    • Other members
    • Club Assistant Governor
    • Southside Web site tulsa southsiderotary .org (Four Way Test)
  • 55. Rotary Resources – District Level
    • District Governor
    • District Administrator
    • District Committee Chairs/Past DG
    • Website – www.6110.org
    • District 6110 manual of Procedure
  • 56. Rotary International Resources
    • Website – www.rotary.org
    • Telephone Number 847-866-3000
    • Access – Your RI member number
    • Rotary Magazine
  • 57. Financial Obligations
    • Birthdays and Anniversaries donate $ 1.00 for each to the Southside Rotary Foundation
    • $ 100 per year for the RI Foundation – used toward Paul Harris Fellowship
    • Fund Raiser - $ 200
    • Dues and Lunches $ 850 per annum
  • 58. Attendance is Key
    • Do your best to:
      • Attend all normal meetings
      • On line meetings – 2 per year
      • Make up at other clubs
      • Board Meetings
    • Consider doing the following
      • District Assembly – May
      • District Conference – September
      • International Convention
  • 59. Club Etiquette
    • Don’t
      • Use the club for business by giving or sending literature
      • Send questionable jokes, religious, or political information via e-mail
      • Use foul language
      • Leave early without telling the speaker prior to the meeting being called to order
      • Complain about something that you think is wrong. Suggest how we can make things better.
      • Miss meetings and if you do make up in another club.
  • 60. Club Etiquette Continued
    • Do
      • Tell fellow members what you do for a living
      • Make business related announcements (be prepared for a fine)
      • Announcements regarding your family
      • Make requests oft the Foundation via the clubs Board of Directors for local organizations.
      • Introduce visiting Rotarians and visitors properly and one at a time.
      • Treat speakers with respect even if you do not agree with their views
      • Make guest and visitors feel welcome
      • Make announcements for the good of the club.
      • Recruit New Members
      • Put spare change in the Uganda Bowls for our orphans
      • Wear your badge at meetings
      • Wear your pin as much as possible
      • Pay dues on time
      • Contribute $ 100 ever year to the RI Foundation
      • Contribute to the SS Foundation $ 1 per year for your age and anniversary and whatever else you wish to contribute
  • 61. Rotarian of the Day
    • Find a speaker – changes from year to year. At times the Rotarian is responsible and at times the Program chairman provides speakers
    • Select someone to lead the Pledge of Allegiance
    • Select someone to give Prayer
    • Make sure speaker will be at the meeting and determine what they will need to give presentation.
    • Meet and greet the speaker
    • Introduce speaker
    • Send your biography to bulletin editor
    • Get the speakers biography and send to bulletin editor
  • 62. Volunteer Opportunities
    • Rotary Supply Medical Network warehouse
    • Bell Ringing for Salvation Army
    • Springdale Elementary
    • Be Wise Immunize
    • Fund Raiser
    • Biscuit Acres
    • Club Board and Committee Leadership
  • 63. Attendance
  • 64. Attendance Requirement
    • Meeting the minimum attendance requirement is your responsibility as a Rotarian
  • 65. Benefits of Attendance
    • Fosters fellowship among club members
    • Provides opportunities to meet new people and reconnect with long-time friends
    • Keeps you current on club, district, and Rotary International news and events
  • 66. Attendance Requirements
    • Attend or make up at least 50% of your Rotary club meetings in each half of the year.
    • Attend at least 30% of your club’s meetings in each half of the year.
    • A member may not miss or fail to make up four consecutive meetings.
    As explained in the Standard Rotary Club Constitution, each member needs to meet the following requirements:
  • 67. Attendance for a Meeting
    • You should be present for at least 60 % of a club meeting for it to count towards the attendance requirement.
    • For example, you would need to be present for at least 36 minutes of a 60 minute meeting.
    15 min 30 min 45 min
  • 68. Attendance at Your Club
    • You should attend at least 30% of your own club ’ s meetings in each half of the year.
    • For example, if your club holds 26 regular weekly meetings in six months, you must attend at least 8 meetings.
  • 69. Attendance at Your Club
    • You should attend at least 30% of your own club ’ s meetings in each half of the year.
    • For example, if your club holds 26 regular weekly meetings in six months, you must attend at least 8 meetings .
  • 70. Make-ups
    • There are many ways that you can still receive attendance credit if you cannot attend you club meeting.
    • Attend a meeting of another club
    • Attend a meeting of a Rotaract or Interact club, Rotary Community Corps, or Rotary Fellowship
    • Attend certain district or RI meetings
    • Participate in club-sponsored event or service project
    • Attend a club board or service committee meeting with authorization of the club board
    • Participate in an E-club meeting for at least 30 minutes
    • (Article 9 , Section 1 of the Club Constitution)
  • 71. Make-up Credit
    • In order to get attendance credit, you must attend a make-up meeting or event within 14 days before or after the regular time of your missed meeting.
  • 72. Meetings of Other Clubs
    • You can make up at Rotary clubs all around the world, which allows you to:
    • Meet a new group of Rotarians
    • Observe how another club operates
    • Share information about your club
    • Make international contacts for club projects
  • 73. Finding Other Clubs
    • To find another club, use Rotary ’ s online Club Locator or the Official Directory . Ask your club secretary for a copy.
    • Be sure to ask the club secretary of the visited club to sign a card or note as proof of your attendance. A signed document ensures that your club gives you attendance credit.
  • 74. Rotaract, Interact, RCC, or Fellowships
    • Making up your meeting with a Rotaract club, Interact club, Rotary Community Corps, or Rotary Fellowship is a great way to explore and find out about these programs. To locate these meetings you can contact your:
    • Club leaders
    • District Rotaract committee chair
    • District Interact committee chair
    • District Rotary Community Corps committee chair
    • District Rotary Fellowships committee chair
  • 75. District or RI Meetings
    • You can also make-up meetings at one of the following district or RI meeting:
    • District conference
    • District assembly
    • District committee meeting (at request of the district governor)
    • RI Committee meeting
    • RI Convention
    • Rotary Institute
  • 76. Club-sponsored Events
    • Participating in a club-sponsored event is a great way to support the service work of your club and make-up a meeting. Check with your club secretary to see if these or other club events may count as make-ups :
    • Club service project
    • Club-sponsored community event
    • Other meetings or events as authorized by the club board
  • 77. Board or Committee Meetings
    • Serving your club through holding a seat on the club board or in an assigned club committee can count as a make-up, if authorized by the board.
  • 78. Excused Absences
    • Absences will be excused if:
    • The absence is approved by your club’s board
    • The sum of the member’s years of membership and age equals 85 or more.
    • (Article 9, Section 3 of the Club Constitution)
  • 79. Termination
    • Failure to meet the attendance requirement may result in termination of membership, if the member fails to:
    • Attend or make-up at least 50% of club meetings in each half of the year
    • Attend 30% of their own club’s regular meetings in each half of the year
    • Attend or make-up four consecutive meetings
            • (Article 11, Section 4 of Club Constitution)
  • 80. Resources
    • The following resources are available on www.rotary.org :
      • Manual of Procedure
      • Rotary Code of Policies
      • Standard Rotary Club Constitution
      • Rotary E-Learning Center