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Module 9
9.2.1  IP addressing  <ul><li>192.168.1.0 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.1 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.2 </li></ul><ul><li>19...
9.2.1  IP addressing  A device is not said to have an address, but that each of the connection points, or interfaces, on t...
9.2.1  IP addressing  These are consecutive numbers.
9.2.3  IPv4 addressing  192.168.0.0  192.168.1.0 192.168.2.0 192.168.3.0 192.168.4.0 192.168.5.0 192.168.6.0 192.168.7.0 1...
9.2.3  IPv4 addressing  <ul><li>192.168.1.0 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.1 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.2 </li></ul><ul><li>...
9.2.3  IPv4 addressing  Classful Addressing.  <ul><li>A multicast address is a unique network address that directs packets...
9.2.3  IPv4 addressing
9.2.3  IPv4 addressing  The first octet range for Class E addresses is 11110000 to 11111111, or 240 to 255 Reserved for re...
9.2.4  Class A, B, C, D, and E IP addresses
9.2.4  Class A, B, C, D, and E IP addresses  <ul><li>You can use these addresses on any private LAN.  </li></ul><ul><li>Yo...
9.2.4  Class A, B, C, D, and E IP addresses  Error ?
9.2.4  Class A, B, C, D, and E IP addresses  Error ?
9.2.5  Reserved IP addresses  An IP address that has binary 0s in all host bit positions is reserved for the network addre...
9.2.5  Reserved IP addresses  An IP address that has binary 1s in all host bit positions is reserved for the broadcast add...
9.2.5  Reserved IP addresses
9.2.5  Reserved IP addresses
9.2.5  Reserved IP addresses
9.2.5  Reserved IP addresses
9.2.6  Public and private IP addresses  It is appropriate to use private addressing on the private side of routers.
9.2.6  Public and private IP addresses  <ul><li>Originally, an organization known as the Internet Network Information Cent...
9.2.6  Public and private IP addresses  <ul><li>Connecting a network using private addresses to the Internet requires tran...
9.2.7  Introduction to subnetting  <ul><li>For communication to occur between different physical network segments: </li></...
9.2.7  Introduction to subnetting
9.2.7  Introduction to subnetting
9.2.8  IPv4 versus IPv6
9.2.8  IPv4 versus IPv6
9.2.8  IPv4 versus IPv6
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Ip Addressing

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Transcript of "Ip Addressing"

  1. 1. Module 9
  2. 2. 9.2.1 IP addressing <ul><li>192.168.1.0 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.1 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.2 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.3 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.4 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.1 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.2 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.3 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.4 </li></ul>
  3. 3. 9.2.1 IP addressing A device is not said to have an address, but that each of the connection points, or interfaces, on that device has an address to a network. <ul><li>2 NIC cards… </li></ul><ul><li>2 MAC addresses </li></ul><ul><li>2 IP addresses </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.0 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.1 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.2 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.3 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.4 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.1 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.2 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.3 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.4 </li></ul>Does not pass data unless programmed to do so.
  4. 4. 9.2.1 IP addressing These are consecutive numbers.
  5. 5. 9.2.3 IPv4 addressing 192.168.0.0 192.168.1.0 192.168.2.0 192.168.3.0 192.168.4.0 192.168.5.0 192.168.6.0 192.168.7.0 192.168.8.0 192.168.9.0 192.168.10.0
  6. 6. 9.2.3 IPv4 addressing <ul><li>192.168.1.0 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.1 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.2 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.3 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.1.4 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.1 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.2 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.3 </li></ul><ul><li>192.168.2.4 </li></ul>192.168.1. 192.168.1. 192.168.1. 192.168.2. 192.168.3. This number must be a unique number, because duplicate addresses would make routing impossible. The only time that the host numbers matter is when the data is on the local area network.
  7. 7. 9.2.3 IPv4 addressing Classful Addressing. <ul><li>A multicast address is a unique network address that directs packets with that destination address to predefined groups of IP addresses. </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore, a single station can simultaneously transmit a single stream of data to multiple recipients. </li></ul>
  8. 8. 9.2.3 IPv4 addressing
  9. 9. 9.2.3 IPv4 addressing The first octet range for Class E addresses is 11110000 to 11111111, or 240 to 255 Reserved for research by IETF All of these criteria identify the class of address.
  10. 10. 9.2.4 Class A, B, C, D, and E IP addresses
  11. 11. 9.2.4 Class A, B, C, D, and E IP addresses <ul><li>You can use these addresses on any private LAN. </li></ul><ul><li>You CANNOT use them on the internet. </li></ul><ul><li>Internet routers will block them. </li></ul>
  12. 12. 9.2.4 Class A, B, C, D, and E IP addresses Error ?
  13. 13. 9.2.4 Class A, B, C, D, and E IP addresses Error ?
  14. 14. 9.2.5 Reserved IP addresses An IP address that has binary 0s in all host bit positions is reserved for the network address. A router uses the network IP address when it forwards data on the Internet.
  15. 15. 9.2.5 Reserved IP addresses An IP address that has binary 1s in all host bit positions is reserved for the broadcast address. Data that is sent to the broadcast address will be read by all hosts on that network
  16. 16. 9.2.5 Reserved IP addresses
  17. 17. 9.2.5 Reserved IP addresses
  18. 18. 9.2.5 Reserved IP addresses
  19. 19. 9.2.5 Reserved IP addresses
  20. 20. 9.2.6 Public and private IP addresses It is appropriate to use private addressing on the private side of routers.
  21. 21. 9.2.6 Public and private IP addresses <ul><li>Originally, an organization known as the Internet Network Information Center (InterNIC) handled IP assignments. </li></ul><ul><li>InterNIC no longer exists and has been succeeded by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). </li></ul>
  22. 22. 9.2.6 Public and private IP addresses <ul><li>Connecting a network using private addresses to the Internet requires translation of the private addresses to public addresses. </li></ul><ul><li>This translation process is referred to as Network Address Translation (NAT). </li></ul><ul><li>NAT is one solution to expand the number of public IP addresses. Two others are: </li></ul><ul><li>classless interdomain routing </li></ul><ul><li>IPv6 </li></ul>
  23. 23. 9.2.7 Introduction to subnetting <ul><li>For communication to occur between different physical network segments: </li></ul><ul><li>IP address of the local (RARP) and destination hosts must be obtained. </li></ul><ul><li>Only then, is it possible to transfer data packets from one network segment to another to reach the destination host. </li></ul>
  24. 24. 9.2.7 Introduction to subnetting
  25. 25. 9.2.7 Introduction to subnetting
  26. 26. 9.2.8 IPv4 versus IPv6
  27. 27. 9.2.8 IPv4 versus IPv6
  28. 28. 9.2.8 IPv4 versus IPv6
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