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Ch25 France-Netherlands BaroqueIV-slideshare
 

Ch25 France-Netherlands BaroqueIV-slideshare

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Ch25 France-Netherlands BaroqueIV-slideshare

Ch25 France-Netherlands BaroqueIV-slideshare
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  • Terms: tenebrism, Caravaggio, Carracci, Iconoclasm, memento mori, allegory, Louis XIV, Absolutism
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  • Europe in the 17 th Century Kings were consolidating the various regions into what would become the modern Nation-States such as France, Germany, etc. Baroque roughly 1600-1750 in Europe A short period with many styles International, with strong regional characteristics Dynamic, theatrical, and combines media in elaborate ways Despite being very much a Counter-Reformation art, there is much secular, aristocratic patrionage: it is an art of the powerful, especially in the south, but less so in the North.
  • European Art during the Reformation and Counter-Reformation
  • What were the consequences of the Protestant Reformation and the Catholic Counter-Reformation for art? Reformation North Protestant Smaller less ostentatious religious works, prints Scripture-based, , virtue, and anti-Rome So NEW allowable subject matter: portraiture, genre, still-life, and landscape Counter Reformation South Catholic large elaborate religious commissions Eucharistic themes, papal themes, teaching, devotional (saints, sacraments) BASICALLY A CIVIL WAR Despite the violence, people, goods and ideas circulated throughout Europe and also the world (Americas encountered in 1492 etc.
  • -The NETHERLANDS in the Seventeenth Century
  • FRANS HALS, Archers of Saint Hadrian, ca. 1633. Oil on canvas. Netherlands -Dutch protestantism led to the prohibition of religious, mythological, and Renaissnace-style history painting, and some danger of iconoclasm. So NEW allowable subject matter: portraiture, genre, still-life, and landscape -here portraiture. Group portrait -also, late 16c dutch art was influenced by Italian Mannerism, but in the 17c the influence of Caravaggio began to spread
  • *REMBRANDT VAN RIJN, The Company of Captain Frans Banning Cocq (Night Watch), 1642. Oil on canvas (cropped from original size), REMBRANDT, along with Rubens, a major 17c figure of European Painting -master of painting, drawing and etching, b. near Lieden, trained in (international) amsterdam and worked in both places -Large group portrait, shows mysterious night lighting although not intended to be nighttime. Mysterious.
  • COMPARISON Figure 24-42 FRANS HALS, Archers of Saint Hadrian, ca. 1633. Oil on canvas, approx. 6 ’ 9” x 11’. AND Figure 24-45 REMBRANDT VAN RIJN, The Company of Captain Frans Banning Cocq (Night Watch), 1642. Oil on canvas (cropped from original size), 11’ 11” x 14’ 4”. -Rembrandt ’s northern Baroque arranged figures at varying distances while Hals still arranged them in an old-fashioned way across the front of the canvas
  • REMBRANDT VAN RIJN, Return of the Prodigal Son, ca. 1665 Deeply religious, deeply personal scenes based on scripture cultivated a meditative, personal salvation congruent with Protestant belief. [I said that!]
  • REMBRANDT VAN RIJN, Christ with the Sick around Him, Receiving the Children (Hundred Guilder Print), ca. 1649 Remind that the print spread not only religious ideas and artistic ideas, but were used for personal devotion and adornment of pious homes. More ordinary people could have access to visual imagery and art and this trend only grows over the next several hundred years The market for ART and imagery would only expand and at present continues to expand Visual Turn?
  • *REMBRANDT VAN RIJN, Self-Portrait, ca. 1659–1660. Oil on canvas -Portraiture. Self portraits a favorite of Rembrandt -known for their depth of expression, less playful as he aged, set the standard for portraits with their interest in the interior character Now wedded to an interest in realism
  • *JAN VERMEER, Allegory of the Art of Painting, 1670–1675. Oil on canvas. Lived and worked in Delft Considered a Caravaggist, most developed as a painter of interior genre scenes. For many years his works were not known or appreciated. Despite small scale of his works, incredible power, use of light, and careful compositions rich in symbolism make him an important artist of the Dutch Baroque Flemish continued in a more Italian tradition, while the Dutch turned away from the Classical tradition. Light from High on the left typical of Vermeer
  • Figure 24-52 JAN VERMEER, The Letter, 1666. Oil on canvas, 1 ’ 5 1/4” x 1’ 3 1/4”. Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. Domestic interior typical of Dutch Genre painting, though here by an exquisite and extremely sophisticated master. Subtle psychological drama.
  • Link to NGA Vermeer, woman holding a balance Use links: Composition; technique; Sumbols and meaning
  • JACOB VAN RUISDAEL, View of Haarlem from the Dunes at Overveen, ca. 1670. Point: Landscape became a staple of Dutch art- one of the secular subject matters possible after art ’s purposes expanded in post-Reformation northern Europe -Low horizon typical of Dutch landscapes of the time
  • WILLEM KALF, Still Life with a Late Ming Ginger Jar, 1669 Not ON EXAM: Points: -Still life- another of the genres or subject matter possible in Post-Reformation Northern Europe -Ming jar, which is actually identifiable and like some that still exist today, reminds us of the importance of lively international, global trade and the money that poured into the Netherlands and cities like Amsterdam because of it
  • RACHEL RUYSCH, Flower Still Life, after 1700. Oil on canvas Not on exam. Another northern European genre- the flower still-life, though even these should be read for their MORALIZING tone eg memento mori, here the faded or falling flowers
  • FRANCE in the seventeenth Century [Baroque France]
  • *NICOLAS POUSSIN, Et in Arcadia Ego, ca. 1655. Oil on canvas -Baroque classicism of france. Poussin was fascinated by Italian Renaissance and Rome, and strove to emulate its calm, balance, and harmonius landscapes with monumental figures -shows peasants -it is an allegory -AND EVEN IN ARCADIA I AM: Death?
  • *LOUIS LE NAIN, Family of Country People, ca. 1640. French Le Nain ’ s peasants are idealized yet real, dignified, subservient (possibly in response to wealthy patron ’ s desires- living conditions horrendous at the time)
  • Plan of the park, palace, and town of Versailles, France, (after a seventeenth-century engraving by FRANÇOIS BLONDEL). The area outlined in the white trapezoid (lower center) is shown in FIG. 24-67 Versailles the statement of Louis XIV ’s absolutist policies
  • Figure 24-67 Aerial view of palace at Versailles, France, begun 1669, and a portion of the gardens and surrounding area. The white trapezoid in the lower part of the plan (FIG. 24-68) outlines the area shown here.
  • Figure 24-69 JULES HARDOUIN-MANSART and CHARLES LE BRUN, Galerie des Glaces (Hall of Mirrors), palace of Versailles, Versailles, France, ca. 1680 NOT ON EXAM Interior of Versailles
  • Figure 24-69 Alternate View With Link to Galerie des Glaces 360 Hall of Mirrors, Versailles, c. 1680, raking view of exterior wall with windows and candelabras. Not ON EXAM
  • QUESTIONS What were the consequences of the Protestant Reformation and the Catholic Counter-Reformation? How does art influence or reflect religion? How does Protestant art differ from Catholic art during the Reformation and Counter Reformation? What were some of the diverse cultures and artistic styles in Spain and Northern Europe? What accounted for them? Who are some of the artists from the 16 th century Spain and Northern Europe? Does religion influence art today? If so, how? How prevalent is religious art today? Why?

Ch25 France-Netherlands BaroqueIV-slideshare Ch25 France-Netherlands BaroqueIV-slideshare Presentation Transcript

  • Baroque IV Baroque Art - Netherlands and France
    • Terms
    • Tenebrism
    • Caravaggio
    • Carracci
    • Iconoclasm
    • Memento mori
    • Allegory
    • Louis XIV
    • Absolutism
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    • Contact Carolyn Gutierrez (609 652-4275) or gutierrc@stockton.edu to make an appointment.
  • Europe in the 17 th Century
  • European Art during the Reformation and Counter-Reformation
    • Protestant Reformation
    • North
    • Protestant
    • Smaller, less ostentatious religious works; prints
    • Scripture-based, virtue, and anti-Rome
    • New subject matter: portraiture, genre, still-life, and landscape
    • Counter Reformation (aka Catholic Reformation
    • South
    • Catholic
    • Large elaborate religious commissions
    • Eucharistic themes, papal themes, teaching, devotional (saints, sacraments)
  • To think about:
    • -What were the consequences of the Protestant Reformation and the Catholic Counter-Reformation for art ?
    • CH. 25
    • The NETHERLANDS in the Seventeenth Century
  • Figure 25-9 FRANS HALS, Archers of Saint Hadrian, ca. 1633. Oil on canvas, approx. 6 ’ 9 ” x 11 ’ . Frans Halsmuseum, Haarlem.
  • Figure 25-13 REMBRANDT VAN RIJN, The Company of Captain Frans Banning Cocq (Night Watch), 1642. Oil on canvas (cropped from original size), 11 ’ 11 ” x 14 ’ 4 ” . Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. (see next for comparison)
  • Figure 25-9 FRANS HALS, Archers of Saint Hadrian, ca. 1633. Oil on canvas, approx. 6 ’ 9 ” x 11 ’ . Figure 25-13 REMBRANDT VAN RIJN, The Company of Captain Frans Banning Cocq (Night Watch), 1642. Oil on canvas (cropped from original size), 11 ’ 11 ” x 14 ’ 4 ” .
  • Figure 25-14 REMBRANDT VAN RIJN, Return of the Prodigal Son, ca. 1665. Oil on canvas, approx. 8 ’ 8 ” x 6 ’ 9 ” . Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg.
  • Figure 25-16 REMBRANDT VAN RIJN, Christ with the Sick around Him, Receiving the Children (Hundred Guilder Print), ca. 1649. Etching, approx. 11 ” x 1 ’ 3 1/4 ” . Pierpont Morgan Library, New York.
  • Figure 25-15 REMBRANDT VAN RIJN, Self-Portrait, ca. 1659–1660. Oil on canvas, approx. 3 ’ 8 3/4 ” x 3 ’ 1 ” . The Iveagh Bequest, Kenwood House, London.
  • Figure 25-1 JAN VERMEER, Allegory of the Art of Painting, 1670–1675. Oil on canvas, 4 ’ 4 ” x 3 ’ 8 ” . Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna.
  • Figure 25-16 JAN VERMEER, The Letter, 1666. Oil on canvas, 1 ’ 5 1/4 ” x 1 ’ 3 1/4 ” . Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.
    • Vermeer, Woman Holding a Balance, ca. 1664
  • Seventeenth-century Dutch Landscape
  • Figure 25-18 JACOB VAN RUISDAEL, View of Haarlem from the Dunes at Overveen, ca. 1670. Oil on canvas, approx. 1 ’ 10 ” x 2 ’ 1 ” . Mauritshuis, The Hague.
  • Dutch Still Life
  • Figure 25-22 WILLEM KALF, Still Life with a Late Ming Ginger Jar, 1669. Oil on canvas, 2 ’ 6 ” x 2 ’ 1 3/4 ” . Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis.
  • Figure 25-23 RACHEL RUYSCH, Flower Still Life, after 1700. Oil on canvas, 2 ’ 6 ” x 2 ’ . The Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo (purchased with funds from the Libbey Endowment, gift of Edward Drummond Libbey).
    • FRANCE in the Seventeenth Century [Baroque France]
  • Figure 25-24 NICOLAS POUSSIN, Et in Arcadia Ego, ca. 1655. Oil on canvas, approx. 2 ’ 10 ” x 4 ’ . Louvre, Paris.
  • Figure 25-27 LOUIS LE NAIN, Family of Country People, ca. 1640. Oil on canvas, approx. 3 ’ 8 ” x 5 ’ 2 ” . Louvre, Paris.
  • [See Fig. 25-32] Plan of the park, palace, and town of Versailles, France, (after a seventeenth-century engraving by FRANÇOIS BLONDEL). The area outlined in the white trapezoid (lower center) is shown in FIG25-32.
  • See fig. 25-32 Aerial view of palace at Versailles, France, begun 1669, and a portion of the gardens and surrounding area. The white trapezoid in the lower part of the plan (FIG. 24-68) outlines the area shown here.
  • Figure 25-33 JULES HARDOUIN-MANSART and CHARLES LE BRUN, Galerie des Glaces (Hall of Mirrors), palace of Versailles, Versailles, France, ca. 1680.
  • Hall of Mirrors, raking view of exterior wall with windows and candelabras. © 2005 Saskia Cultural Documentation, Ltd. Galerie des Glaces 360
  • Questions:
    • What were the consequences of the Protestant Reformation and the Catholic Counter-Reformation?
    • How does art influence or reflect religion? How does Protestant art differ from Catholic art during the Reformation and Counter Reformation?
    • What were some of the diverse cultures and artistic styles in Spain and Northern Europe? What accounted for them?
    • Who are some of the artists from the 16 th century Spain and Northern Europe?
    • Does religion influence art today? If so, how? How prevalent is religious art today? Why?