4 Reading Rate

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4 Reading Rate

  1. 1. Reading Rate “ Reading well” does not mean reading everything at the same pace and with the same technique. Good readers are flexible readers. Once they determine their purpose for reading, they adjust their rate to fit the type of material they are reading.
  2. 2. 5 Categories of Reading Rates CAREFUL – used to master content including details, evaluate material, outline, summarize, paraphrase, analyze, solve problems, memorize, evaluate literary value or read poetry.
  3. 3. 5 Categories of Reading Rates NORMAL – used to answer a specific question, note details, solve problems, read material of average difficulty, understand relationship of details to main ideas, appreciate beauty or literary style, keep up with current events, or read with the intention of later retelling what you have read.
  4. 4. 5 Categories of Reading Rates RAPID – used to review familiar material, get the main idea or central thought, retrieve information for short-term use, read light material for relaxation or pleasure or comprehend the basic plot.
  5. 5. 5 Categories of Reading Rates SCANNING – used to get an overview of the content or to preview. This is the method by which you read the newspaper.
  6. 6. Skimming as an HKA Skill Since you will be under time pressure when searching and sending for an answer, it is best to develop your skimming skill. Here are some tips on how to develop quick reading: <ul><li>Move your eyes quickly down a page of text and use peripheral vision </li></ul><ul><li>Move your mouse or go to the next page quickly </li></ul><ul><li>Determine what you want from the material before you read it </li></ul>
  7. 7. Skimming as an HKA Skill <ul><li>Consider the author's intention </li></ul><ul><li>Look at chapter questions and chapter summaries, when available </li></ul><ul><li>Formulate your own question (remember the levels of reading comprehension) </li></ul><ul><li>Use Ctrl F (Find) with a keyword from the question, your search phrase or a synonymous word to locate quickly where in the article is the information you're looking </li></ul>

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